Subscribe to african-american

african-american

Diverse Unfreedoms and their Ghosts

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2016 - 8:36am
Sarada Balagopalan, Cati Coe, and Keith Green (Rutgers U, Camden)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 1, 2016

Call for Conference Papers:

Diverse Unfreedoms and their Ghosts

A One-Day Conference

 

Rutgers University, Camden

March 31, 2017

 

Deadline for abstracts: October 1, 2016

 

Afro-Latinos in the Media: What the media teaches our kids about race, class, and gender identity

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2016 - 8:28am
AfroPresencia
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 3, 2016

We are soliciting essay contributions for the new book, Afro-Latino/as and the Media: What the media teaches our kids about race, class and gender identity.

Essays in this book critically examine how print, film, and digital media positively and negatively represent Afro-Latino groups and their race, culture, and gender identities. The major premise of the text is that media shapes our understanding of the world and how it functions; the minor premise is that the imagery, conversations, and reactions to what is presented in the media influence the minds of youth and their understanding.

Roots at 40: Reflections and Remembrances [Update]

updated: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 11:31am
Goodwin College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show’s producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many “conversations about race” that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Edited anthology of Conjure, Hoodoo and Voodoo in African-American Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 11:25am
Dr. James Mellis/ William Paterson University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

Articles are sought for a collection of essays on representations of Conjure, Hoodoo and Voodoo in African-American literature. This collection seeks to explore how African-American writers have used, referenced, engaged and disengaged with Conjure, Hoodoo and Voodoo in their writing through various cultural and historical movements.

Utopia and Race

updated: 
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 - 11:25am
Utopian Studies: The Journal for the Society for Utopian Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Utopia and Race
Special Issue of Utopian Studies--a peer-reviewed publication of the Society for Utopian Studies

Time and Trauma in Twentieth-century Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 - 11:15am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 2017
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 9, 2016

Abstracts for papers are requsted for the panel "Time and Trauma in Twentieth-century Literature" at

The 48th NeMLA Annual Convention, March 23-26, 2017, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

 

Philosophical Ruptures: The Counter-hegemonic Mission of Africana Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:31am
LaRose T. Parris/LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 30, 2016

The literary productions of eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century African diasporic thinkers are widely acknowledged as the discursive corrective to African enslavement and colonization under Western hegemonic domination. Olaudah Equiano’s, David Walker’s, and Frederick Douglass’s works emphasize the significance of ancient African history and agitate for the abolition of chattel slavery; in the early twentieth-century, W.E.B. Du Bois’s Black Reconstruction (1935) and C.L.R. James’s The Black Jacobins (1938) contest the Eurocentricity of traditional Marxian thought by highlighting the import of enslaved African labor to the development of the modern Western capitalism.

"Straight Outta English"

updated: 
Monday, June 27, 2016 - 11:27am
Todd Craig / Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

“…STRAIGHT OUTTA ENGLISH…"

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR

CHANGING ENGLISH: STUDIES IN CULTURE AND EDUCATION

 

After the success of the NWA hip-hop biopic Straight Outta Compton, the importance that NWA played in the emerging culture we knew then as hip-hop is crystal clear. Subsequently, it is also clear that this once-emerging culture is now the pulse for popular culture. At the same time, movies like Dope become critical in thinking about the rendering and (re)rendering of hip-hop in this new wave of popular culture. This viewpoint is evident by simply observing the following nexus of events:

 

Baltimore and the Emergence of the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 3:31pm
Lena Ampadu/Northeast Modern Language Association (NEMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Baltimore, Maryland, has been the home of several important African American authors, including Frederick Douglass and Frances E. W. Harper.  In addition to these major writers who influenced the emergence of African American protest literature of the tumultuous nineteenth century, there are several other significant writers of prose and poetry who have lived in the city and created African American literature. Notable examples include Zora Neale Hurston, Countee Cullen, Waters Turpin, Eugenia Collier, and Lucille Clifton.

International James Baldwin Conference

updated: 
Friday, June 24, 2016 - 9:47am
The Department of American Culture and Literature, Başkent University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS

International James Baldwin Conference

04-05 May 2017

Ankara, Turkey

Pages