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James Baldwin Review Volume 6

updated: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019 - 9:40am
James Baldwin Review
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 1, 2020

 

James Baldwin Review (JBR), an annual peer-reviewed journal, is seeking submissions for its sixth volume. An Open Access online publication, James Baldwin Review brings together a wide array of peer-reviewed critical essays and creative non-fiction on the life, writings, and legacies of James Baldwin. JBR publishes essays that invigorate scholarship on James Baldwin, catalyse explorations of the literary, political, and cultural influence of Baldwin’s writing and political activism, and deepen our understanding and appreciation of this complex and luminary figure.

The Short Story's Global Dimensions - Panel ACLA Chicago

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 3:02pm
Gavin Jones (Stanford), Michael Collins (King's College, London)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Gavin Jones (Stanford) and Michael Collins (KCL) are seeking contributors for a panel on the "The Short Story's Global Dimensions" at the Annual Meeting of the ACLA in Chicago, 19th - 22nd March 2020. Abstract proposals of around 200 words should be sent to the organisers by August 30th.

 

https://www.acla.org/short-storys-global-dimensions  

 

SSSL 2020: The Uses and Abuses of Shame

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:54pm
Courtney George/ Columbus State University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Society for the Study of Southern Literature (SSSL) 2020: The Uses and Abuses of Shame in the American South

Believing Women in the Late-Nineteenth Century

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:43pm
Arielle Zibrak / University of Wyoming
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 19, 2019

Please consider submitting an abstract for this panel proposal at the 2020 C19 conference in Coral Gables, FL. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee in September 2018 helped make “Believe Women” a new rallying cry for the #metoo movement(s). This roundtable will examine the contentious issue of women’s believability during the latter half of the nineteenth century, a time when the credibility of women was also at the forefront of popular consciousness, occasionally heralded but more often interrogated. How did writers and activists push back against the persistent gaslighting of women during the postbellum period?

Octavia Butler and Afrofuturism Edited Collection

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:42pm
Lilith Acadia, Ji Hyun Lee
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

Seeking final submissions for Octavia Butler’s Afrofuturistic Visions: Reframing Identity, Culture, and History. This edited collection is under contract with Lexington Books and slated for publication in 2020.

 

Call for Chapters - Collected Essays on Teaching African American Texts by White Faculty

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Following up the 2019 NeMLA Roundtable “White Allies/Co-conspirators:Teaching African American Literature,” Lexington Books has expressed interest in publishing a collection of essays about white faculty teaching texts by persons of color.

African American & Latinx Literature Case Studies; Teaching While Privileged

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:15pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Privilege comes in many forms whether race, class, gender, or education. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 84% of full time faculty are white, 25% of those professors are women. With these overarching statistics nationally, at many institutions, classes that focus on African American or Latinx literature are taught largely, if not completely, by faculty who are not from that racial or cultural demographic. When white faculty teach these courses, they may need to confront their own privilege and cultural “blind spots.” Proposed case study presentations can address teaching either African American or Latinx texts.

Soundtracks of African American Prose

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

African American works often include references to music that may or may not be recognized by a wide reading audience. For example, the spirituals that Martin Luther King, Jr. chanted in his speeches provide added rhetorical context for his words; yet those who do not know the songs do not have a more nuanced understanding of his oratory. Langston Hughes and James Baldwin both crafted their writing with music in mind. Baldwin acknowledged in the New York Times Book Review that “I…model myself on jazz musicians and try to write the way they sound.”

Hip Hop Ecologies (Workshop and Special Issue)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 2:09pm
University of Konstanz, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Hip Hop Ecologies: A Workshop at the University of Konstanz (June 26-28, 2020)

Hip hop is one of the globally most successful forms of cultural production today. Since its emergence in the African American and Latino neighborhoods of 1970s New York City, it has spread around the world and exerted a considerable impact not only on pop culture, but on societal debates around race, class, public safety, nationality, gender, and a range of other issues. The rapidly expanding field of hip hop studies has examined its artistic development and cultural significance from a variety of angles. What has remained almost entirely absent from scholarly debate is the relationship between hip hop and the environment.

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