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UPDATE: [African-American] Symbiosis 2009: Boston and the New Atlantic World (due 2/20/09; for 6/25-6/28/09)

updated: 
Wednesday, January 7, 2009 - 4:24pm
Leslie Eckel

"Boston and the New Atlantic World"

The 7th Biennial Symbiosis Conference

June 25-28, 2009

Suffolk University, Boston, Massachusetts

Plenary speakers:
Richard Brantley (University of Florida)
Anna Brickhouse (University of Virginia)
Mark Peterson (University of California, Berkeley)

* NEW deadline for proposals: February 20, 2009 *

* NEW conference website: http://blogs.cas.suffolk.edu/symbiosis2009/ *
Please see website for details about conference location and accommodation options.

UPDATE: [African-American] Submissions: Street Cred: Expanding the Canon of African American Literature

updated: 
Sunday, January 4, 2009 - 8:16pm
Kimberly Collins

The writings by a new cast of African American writers, who write within
the genre known as “Street Lit,” present a space for the African American
scholar to chronicle and offer meaning to these writers’ works and to
assess how these texts represent African American literature. Because
these non-canonized African American writers enjoy the attention of an
excited new readership, it is critical to examine how and where they may
enter the canon of African American literature.

CFP: [African-American] African American Poetry (2/1/09; journal issue)

updated: 
Sunday, January 4, 2009 - 4:09am
Susan B.A. Somers-Willett

Rattle, a biannual literary journal, is accepting submissions of poetry
written by African Americans and essays about contemporary African
American poetry (open to authors of all backgrounds) for a special
tribute to African American poets. The issue will feature interviews
with Toi Derricotte and Terrance Hayes alongside the work of about two
dozen African American poets in the tribute section and selected essays
(1000-2500 words each) written in conversational, non-academic prose.
Essays should not be about a particular author but should instead address
the overall landscape of African American poetry today and/or the
entanglements of representation and readership inherent in contemporary

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