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Queer Death, De(con)struction, and Contagion: Affective Rhythms in Interdisciplinary Studies

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 7:08pm
University of California, Merced/Queer Theory Symposium Committee

Inaugural Interdisciplinary Queer Studies Symposium
University of California, Merced
Saturday, April 16th, 2016

Keynote: Eric A. Stanley, UC Riverside

Eric A. Stanley is an assistant professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Along with Chris Vargas, Eric directed the films Homotopia (2006) and Criminal Queers (2015). A coeditor of the anthology Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex (AK Press, 2011) which won the Prevention for a Safe Society award and was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award, Eric's other writing can be found in the journals Social Text, American Quarterly, Women and Performance, and TSQ.

What Next? The Episodic and The Serial--MLA in Philadelphia 2017--deadline 10 February

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 6:13pm
Katherine Fusco/MLA Philadelphia

This proposed special session on the episodic and the serial invites participants to consider the limitations and opportunities offered by episodic and serial forms across a variety of media (film, comics, novels, the poetic sequence, the podcast, etc.). Papers may consider such issues as narrative, temporality, identity, media ecology, and/or technology and aesthetics. To explore our topic, we will use Pecha Kucha presentations, an appropriate format for our subject!

300-word abstract by 10 Feb 2016; Katherine Fusco (fusco.katherine@gmail.com)

REMINDER_DUE JAN. 15 Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities and Public Ethics 3.1 (April 2016)

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 4:35pm
Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics

Ethos: A Digital Review of the Arts, Humanities, and Public Ethics—a peer-reviewed, interdisciplinary online journal and digital forum—invites submissions for its April 2016 issue. For this issue of the Ethos journal, we invite submissions of original scholarly work that consider topics relevant to the project's intellectual interests in the arts, humanities, and public ethics. Articles may explore literary texts, film, music, trends in cultural criticism and "theory," or issues of wider social and political concern. Interested contributors are encouraged to browse through our digital archive of forum posts and journal issues to learn more about the range of topics featured on the project.

[UPDATE] Literary Form and Reform [Shanghai, 17-18 May, 2016, Abstracts due February 29, 2016]

updated: 
Saturday, January 2, 2016 - 1:59am
Nan Zhang; Miles Link, Fudan University

The resurgence of formalist interests in recent years has sparked new discussions of the conception, role, and significance of form in literary and cultural studies as well as pedagogies. In her 2007 PMLA essay "What Is New Formalism," Marjorie Levinson lays out several strains of new formalism emerging in the American academy, which simultaneously embrace a renewal of attention to aesthetic form and express divergent emphases and agendas.

Postcolonial Shakespeares - CFP for Postcolonial Interventions Vol I, Issue 2 -

updated: 
Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 12:16pm
Postcolonial Interventions: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Postcolonial Studies

2016 marks the quartercentenary of Shakespeare's death and the upcoming issue of Postcolonial Interventions would focus on the continued relevance of multiple Shakespeares in the culture-scape of the postcolonial world. It is true that not only were Shakespearean plays shaped in many ways by colonial discourses, especially discourses of racial difference, but Shakespearean plays also initially functioned as those "signs taken for wonders" through which the colonial administrators sought to consolidate imperial hegemony, as evident from such critical works as Post-Colonial Shakespeares (1999).

[UPDATE] Deadline extended for disClosure: A Journal of Social Theory, Volume 25: Transnational Lives

updated: 
Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 11:27am
University of Kentucky disClosure: A Journal of Social Theory

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: 1 February 2016, by 5pm EST

The editorial collective of disClosure seeks submissions that explore Transnational Lives as they are understood in a variety of areas and disciplines, including (but not limited to) Sociology; Gender and Women's Studies; History; Philosophy; Anthropology; Political Science; Hispanic Studies; Communications; Theories of Transnationality, Hybridity and Bifocality; and Literature (particularly analyses dealing with border studies, immigration, or transnational lives). Possible topics might include:

CALL FOR PAPERS: disClosure: A Journal of Social Theory, Volume 25: Transnational Lives

updated: 
Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 11:18am
University of Kentucky disClosure: A Journal of Social Theory

The editorial collective of disClosure seeks submissions that explore Transnational Lives as they are understood in a variety of areas and disciplines, including (but not limited to) Sociology; Gender and Women's Studies; History; Philosophy; Anthropology; Political Science; Hispanic Studies; Communications; Theories of Transnationality, Hybridity and Bifocality; and Literature (particularly analyses dealing with border studies, immigration, or transnational lives). Possible topics might include:

Different Drummers: Military Unit Cohesion and Its Discontents

updated: 
Wednesday, December 30, 2015 - 4:51pm
Tad Tuleja

One goal of military basic training is to replace recruits' focus on their own individuality with an unquestioned devotion to group solidarity. No military unit—whether as small as a squad or as large as an army—can survive unless its members subordinate their personal desires to collective action. This "de-individualization" is evident in everything from dress codes to forms of address, from small-arms drill to a reverence for "proper channels" and "chain of command." To be a member of the armed forces is, by definition, to be subordinate not only to those higher in rank but also to a protocols, regulations, and orders designed to ensure the efficient functioning of the whole.

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