Subscribe to RSS - african-american


Edited Collection on the Portrayal of Black Men in Reality TV (Nov 30)

Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 7:27pm
Jervette R. Ward, Ph.D. / University of Alaska Anchorage

Contributions are being sought for a proposed edited collection that explores the portrayals of Black men in reality television. This collection aims to address representations of masculinity, comparisons to Black women in reality TV, class issues, queer theory, masculine psychology, patriarchal constructions, sexuality, invisibility, respectability, and social activism or lack of activism. This collection, tentatively titled There's No Blachelor: Portrayals of Black Men in Reality TV, is a follow-up to the book Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV (Rutgers University Press Oct/Nov 2015 - ).

MELUS Special Issue CFP: Pedagogy in Anxious Times

Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:57pm
Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the US

2017 Special Issue Call For Papers in MELUS

Teaching Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States: Pedagogy in Anxious Times
Guest Editors: Cristina Stanciu and Anastasia Lin

[REMINDER] ACLA 2016 - "Literary (De)Formations"

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 1:53pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

CFP [UPDATE] - Visionary Texts, Past and Present: (Re)visionings and (Re)imaginings

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:26am
Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies and Thought

"The visionary starts with a clean sheet of paper, and reimagines the world." — Malcolm Gladwell

"It's a very salutary thing to realize that the rather dull universe in which most of us spend most of our time is not the only universe there is." — Aldous Huxley

Philosophers, poets, and artists in every era have revisioned and reimagined the world in ways that have inspired historical transformations. Visionary texts – whether they reach proleptically into an imagined future, analeptically reconsider the past, or urgently re-envision the present – have offered us alternative possibilities of understanding who and where we are.

Papers on Language and Literature: Call for Special Issue Proposals

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 11:10am
PLL: Papers on Language and Literature

Papers on Language and Literature is seeking proposals for special issues on subjects including but not limited to

Digital Humanities


Literary Translation

Print Culture

PLL is a generalist publication that is committed to publishing work on a variety of literatures, languages, and chronological periods. We accept proposals year-round. We are a quarterly and expect to publish a special issue once a year, every year. The specific volume and issue will be determined later, depending on the editors' schedule.

[UPDATE] - Deadline Extended - OCTAVIA E. BUTLER: CELEBRATING LETTERS, LIFE, and LEGACY - February 26-28, 2016

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 10:17am
Octavia E. Butler Society

February 24, 2016 will mark the tenth anniversary of the passing of Octavia E. Butler. To commemorate her contributions to the world of letters, the Octavia E. Butler Society solicits papers for a special conference to be hosted by Spelman College February 26-28, 2016. The Society welcomes proposals of 250 words focused on any aspect of Butler's life, work, and influence. Because a major goal of the Society is to encourage the teaching of her works in the academy and beyond, we also invite submissions addressing approaches to teaching Butler in any pedagogical environment. Panel proposals are also encouraged.

On the Footsteps of Dwarves: Different Readings of a Mythical Figure in Popular Culture (15.10.2015) [REMINDER]

Monday, September 21, 2015 - 7:47am
Dr. Feryal Cubukcu, Dr. Sabine Planka

Today more than ever fairy tales permeate pop culture, literature,
music, fine arts, opera, ballet and cinema. Speaking of the history of
stories and especially fairy-tales, we may say that the Pot of Soup, the
Cauldron of Story, has always been boiling for centuries. Dwarves have
always been a recurring image and a character from the fairy tales to
the novels.
Mythology itself presents dwarves not only as treasurekeepers and
remarkable workers, but calling them gnome, kobold, bogey, brownie or
leprechaun. Zealous, sharp and small in statue they are often shown as
counterparts to the inane giant. The possible dualistic arrangement