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[UPDATE] Panopticon: Surveillance, Suspicion, Fear (4/2/2016). Abstracts: 1/15/2016

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 9:59pm
Abbes Maazaoui, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania is requesting proposals/abstracts for its fourth international conference on Fear, Suspicion, Surveillance, to be held on Saturday, April 2, 2016.

Abstract deadline extended: January 15, 2016.

Keynote Speaker: J.K. Van Dover, Winner of the 2015 George N. Dove Award for Mystery, Detective & Crime Fiction Study

European Beat Studies Network Annual Conference, Manchester 27-29 June 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 7:31pm
European Beat Studies Network

We invite proposals for the Fifth Annual Conference of the EBSN, which will take place in Manchester, UK, from 27‐29 June, at The Wonder Inn (http://www.thewonderinn.co.uk), in the heart of the city.

As always, papers on any aspect of Beat creativity are welcomed, but especially in relation to two central themes: music and science. The themes are reflected in our two confirmed conference keynotes: C.P. Lee, legendary Manchester musician and musicologist, and Andrew Lees, Professor of Neurology.

[UPDATE] deadline extended to January 11, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 5:03pm
Space Between Society: Literature and Culture 1914-1945

The 18th annual conference of the Space Between Society focuses on the concept of surveillance—watching, listening, recording—as it relates to literature, art, history, music, theatre, media, and spatial or material culture between 1914 and 1945. From the rise of totalitarianism to the dwindling borders of the British Empire, global citizens were under constant scrutiny as governments, artists, and documentarians developed new ways of listening in.

CFP: Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders Transnational Studies Graduate Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 4:36pm
Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders

Shifting Tides, Anxious Borders: A Graduate Student Conference
in Transnational American Studies (7th Annual) at Binghamton University

Theme: "Occupying Nations and Exceptional (dis)Placements"

Date: Saturday, April 9, 2016

Keynote: Professor Anne McClintock

Deadline for Proposal Submission: March 2nd, 2016

New website "Why Social Theory?" Seeks Pedagogy Contributors

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 1:08pm
"Why Social Theory?"

The Committee on Social Theory at the University of Kentucky is excited to announce our forthcoming project, the website "Why Social Theory?"

This site is designed to become the premiere source for scholars on the subject of Social Theory. As part of the website, we are designing a resource of pedagogical materials for a section on teaching. These contributions can include:

Roots and Routes: Exploring Movement, Mobility, and Belonging (20-21 May 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 1:05pm
Endnotes: UBC English Graduate Conference

Roots and Routes: Exploring Movement, Mobility, and Belonging

Date: 20-21 May.

Location: UBC, Vancouver, Canada.

Deadline for Abstracts: 31 January 2016

Keynote Speakers: Caren Kaplan, University of California, Davis and Miranda Burgess, University of British Columbia.

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What does it mean to be from a place or a position? To move from one position to another? What does it mean to be "moved" by an aesthetic experience?

Scenes of Interracial Intimacies: Proposed Panel for BWWC 2016 (deadline: December 20, 2015)

updated: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 - 12:32pm
Deanna Koretsky / Spelman College

Vladimir Nabokov famously expressed that the theme of "a Negro-white intermarriage which is a complete and glorious success resulting in lots of children and grandchildren" has been "utterly taboo" in Western literature. This was a taboo that British women writers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries regularly explored, and even challenged. From the explosively doomed union between Rochester and Bertha Mason in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, to the fetishistic gaze within which the female narrator holds the protagonist of Aphra Behn's Oronooko, to the forced erasure of the happy marriage between Juba and Lucy from Maria Edgeworth's Belinda, British women's fiction represents a range of interests in and encounters with interracial relationships.

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