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Panopticon: Surveillance, Suspicion, Fear (4/2/2016). Abstracts: 12/1/2015

updated: 
Thursday, September 24, 2015 - 10:56am
Abbes Maazaoui, College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, Lincoln University in Pennsylvania

The College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (Lincoln University, Pennsylvania) is requesting proposals/abstracts for its fourth international conference, to be held on Saturday, April 2, 2016. The conference theme is "Panopticon: Surveillance, Suspicion, Fear."

Abstract deadline: December 1, 2015.

[REMINDER] Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:37am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

updated: 
Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:55am
Postcolonial Studies@ Emory

Postcolonial Studies @Emory Solicits Book Reviews

Postcolonial Studies @Emory: https://scholarblogs.emory.edu/postcolonialstudies/
Faculty Developer: Deepika Bahri, Deepika [dot] bahri [at] emory [dot] edu
Book Review Editor: Caroline Schwenz, cschwen [at] emory [dot] edu

Postcolonial Studies @ Emory is a long standing website that aims to create a more inclusive digital community for postcolonial studies scholars across the globe. Our website accepts book review submissions as well as summaries of important postcolonial works for our Digital Bookshelf.

Edited Collection on the Portrayal of Black Men in Reality TV (Nov 30)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 7:27pm
Jervette R. Ward, Ph.D. / University of Alaska Anchorage

Contributions are being sought for a proposed edited collection that explores the portrayals of Black men in reality television. This collection aims to address representations of masculinity, comparisons to Black women in reality TV, class issues, queer theory, masculine psychology, patriarchal constructions, sexuality, invisibility, respectability, and social activism or lack of activism. This collection, tentatively titled There's No Blachelor: Portrayals of Black Men in Reality TV, is a follow-up to the book Real Sister: Stereotypes, Respectability, and Black Women in Reality TV (Rutgers University Press Oct/Nov 2015 - http://bit.ly/1NL1HdV ).

MELUS Special Issue CFP: Pedagogy in Anxious Times

updated: 
Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 1:57pm
Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the US

2017 Special Issue Call For Papers in MELUS

Teaching Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States: Pedagogy in Anxious Times
Guest Editors: Cristina Stanciu and Anastasia Lin

[REMINDER] ACLA 2016 - "Literary (De)Formations"

updated: 
Monday, September 21, 2015 - 1:53pm
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

In her recent study, The Forms of the Affects (2014), Eugenie Brinkema announces, "We may well be at the beginning of what will eventually be called the twenty-first century 'return to form' in the humanities" (39). Brinkema marks MLQ's special issue, "Reading for Form" (2000), which was later published as a collection of essays under the same name (2006), both edited by Susan J. Wolfson and Marshall Brown, as the beginning of this return to form. Meredith Martin's The Rise and Fall of Meter: Poetry and English National Culture, 1860-1930 (2012) and Derek Attridge's Moving Words: Forms of English Poetry (2013), to name only two of the many recent publications that address form, seem to support Brinkema's claim.

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