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[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

"Laboring, Loafing, and Languishing": Work and Identity in Antebellum American Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Hartford, CT March 17-20 2016

In 1784, Benjamin Franklin writes of Americans "[we] do not inquire concerning a stranger, what is he? But, what can he do?" When the first Europeans settled the shores of what is now the United States, hard work was necessary for the very survival of the small communities, yet since then, the notion of hard work and a strong "work ethic" has passed into American consciousness as a (if not the) defining virtue of both an individual's identity and of national identity. This panel seeks papers exploring what literary work produced in "Antebellum America" (roughly 1820-1861) has to say about this idea of hard work as the primary shaper of both individual and national identity.

Conference marking the 40th Anniversary of the television miniseries Roots

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 3:53pm
Goodwin College

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show's producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many "conversations about race" that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Still Searching for Nella Larsen / NeMLA Hartford CT, 17-20 March 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 2:14pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

The year 2016 marks the 125th anniversary of the birth of Nella Larsen. In spite of the modest size of her œuvre and her early departure from the scene, by all accounts she ranks as one of the leading writers of the Harlem Renaissance. Well regarded during her brief literary career and for a few years thereafter, her works—like their creator—nevertheless slipped into obscurity. In 1986, Deborah McDowell's publication of a new edition of Larsen's two novels was a key element in sparking a revival of interest that took hold in the 1990s and has continued to this day.

CFP: Black Performing Arts (PCA/ACA National Conference, Seattle, March 21-25 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 1:56pm
Michael Borshuk and Jonafa Banbury

Call For Proposals: Sessions, Panels, Papers

DEADLINE: October 1, 2015

The Black Performing Arts Area provides a scholarly forum to share and disseminate research pertaining to the Black performing and visual arts. Broadly defined, the area focuses on all forms of performing and visual arts, including jazz, blues, gospel, hip hop, rhythm and blues, Caribbean music, dance, poetry, drawing, painting, sculpture, ceramics, photography, and acting, in the mainstream marketplace.

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:55am
Kate Costello/ University of Oxford

Placing Bilingualism: Bilingualism in Comparative Perspective
Seminar at ACLA Annual Meeting
March 17-20, Harvard University, Cambridge MA

Submission deadline: September 23

Bilingualism is a phenomenon that unites literary creation across geographic and temporal boundaries. Yet questions about the role of bilingual competencies in literature often remain overlooked. This panel seeks to bring together scholars across disciplines in exploring the place of bilingualism in literary production and the comparative potential of bilingualism in literary criticism.

Feminist Singularities [UPDATE]

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 11:31am
ACLA 2016: American Comparative Literature Association

Co-organizers: Jacquelyn Ardam, UCLA; Ronjaunee Chatterjee, CalArts

2015 marked the 30-year anniversary of the publication of Donna Haraway's "A Cyborg Manifesto," whose radical questioning of the divisions between human and machine, matter and meaning, and gendered and "postgendered" existence continues to animate our social reality. Recent discussions in the field of new materialism, which grapple with questions of embodiment and materiality, have opened up new avenues for theorizing femininity outside of conventional frameworks.

Publication of 5 Edited Books with ISBN

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:50am
Professor B.Panda

Call for Papers for Edited Books with ISBN
Last Date 31st December 2015
Generally, most people have their own ideas of what literature is. When enrolling in a literary course at university, you expect that everything on the reading list will be "literature". Similarly, you might expect everything by a known author to be literature, even though the quality of that author's work may vary from publication to publication. Perhaps you get an idea just from looking at the cover design on a book whether it is "literary" or "pulp". Literature then, is a form of demarcation, however fuzzy, based on the premise that all texts are not created equal. Some have or are given more value than others.

Bakhtin for Tomorrow! - April 9-10, 2016 @ SUNY Buffalo

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 12:37am
University of British Columbia

Bakhtin For Tomorrow!

We seek additional presenters for a panel aimed at contributing to conference discussion about intersections between formally innovative poetry and recent findings in empirical linguistics speech research. Please send an expression of interest and 100-word bio by September 8 so that we can constitute a 4-5-member panel. Conference abstracts (250 words) for 10-12 minute papers would be due 15 September (extended deadline).

ICAF, 14-16 April 2016, University of South Carolina

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2015 - 8:25pm
International Comic Arts Forum (ICAF)

ICAF, the International Comic Arts Forum, invites proposals for scholarly papers for its eighteenth annual meeting, to be held at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, from Thursday, April 14, through Saturday, April 16, 2016. Confirmed guests include comics artists Howard Cruse, Keith Knight, Cece Bell, and Prof. Michael Chaney of Dartmouth College.

The deadline to submit proposals is November 6, 2015.

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