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african-american

Utopia and Dystopia in 'Cannibal' Literature of the Black Atlantic

updated: 
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 - 11:30am
SAMLA 88
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

In The Tropics Bite Back, literary scholar Valérie Loichot highlights Maryse Condé’s urging of Caribbean writers to “bite back” (mordre en retour) at their respective colonial powers. One method, which Condé calls ‘literary cannibalism,’ has been employed by authors throughout the African diaspora. Examples include Zora Neale Hurston’s revisiting of Shakespeare’s Hamlet in her short story “Spunk”, Condé’s own Windward Heights, a revision of Charlotte Brönte’s Victorian classic, and Alice Randall’s The Wind Done Gone.

SAMLA 88 / African American Utopias

updated: 
Monday, May 30, 2016 - 11:10am
Thomas Cassidy / South Carolina State University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 3, 2016

 

Religion in American Literature

updated: 
Monday, May 9, 2016 - 10:17am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association, 11/11-11/13, 2016
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

This panel seeks to address how questions of faith have shaped cultural meanings in American literary history.  In particular, it welcomes papers that examine the relationship between secularity and literary development in the United States.  Some of the questions we will consider are: How did the growth in secularity influence the way American writers conceptualized faith and experienced transcendence?  How did it influence the way they responded to suffering? How did they express the tension of living within a secular age? What are the expressions of transcendence within secular culture? 

The proposal deadline is June 10, 2016.  Please submit your proposal by going to the PAMLA website:  pamla.org

[UPDATE] Women & Work in Literature CFP - abstracts now due June 10

updated: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 4:07pm
Pacific Ancient & Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 30, 2016

Session Description:
How do writers represent the work of being women—where “work” is defined broadly to encompass not only paid labor inside and outside the home, but also the work of performing femininity and domesticity? How do writers address social assumptions about who should be performing work, and for what purpose? How do race, class, sexuality and national identity affect women’s ability to define both the meaning of their work and their ability to engage in work?

Planned Obsolescence: Texts, Theory, Technology

updated: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 9:21am
Université de Liège (Belgium)

Call for papers
Planned Obsolescence: Texts, theory, technology
Université de Liège (Belgium) - December 8th and 9th, 2016

[Pour le français, voir plus bas.]

REMINDER 452ºF cpf 16 "Imaginary of Open Space in Contemporary Culture"

updated: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 6:15am
452ºF JOURNAL OF LITERARY THEORY AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

We are pleased to announce the call for papers for the next issue of 452oF: Journal of Literary Theory and Comparative Literature, which will focus on Imaginary of Open Space in Contemporary Culture. We would appreciate the dissemination of the attached document, in which further information can be found.

The journal has published fourteen issues so far and been included in several indexes. We would also like to point that one of its key features is that all accepted papers are translated into Spanish, English, Catalan and Euskera. If you are still not familiar with 452oF, we kindly invite you to have a look at its last issue at http://www.452f.com/.

CFP: American Women Writers and the Short Story

updated: 
Monday, May 2, 2016 - 6:16pm
Society for the Study of the American Short Story

Call for Papers: American Women Writers and the Short Story
ALA Symposium "The American Short Story: An Expansion of the Genre"
Savannah, Georgia
October 20-22, 2016

Proposal Deadline: May 15, 2016

CFP: Edited Volume on Subalternity and Superheroism (Abstracts due May 30)

updated: 
Monday, May 2, 2016 - 4:28pm
Rafael Ponce-Cordero

Working Title
Can the Subaltern Be a Superhero? The Politics of Non-Hegemonic Superheroism

Description
Superheroes are, by definition, guardians of law and order, i.e. of the status quo. Not coincidentally, the majority of them—and certainly the most famous ones—are male, straight, and white. Yet there are costumed crime-fighters who do not conform to that tacit rule and serve, in this sense, as examples of what we can call alternative superheroism. Those are the ones this collection of essays will examine.

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