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[UPDATE] SCMS 2016 - Hollywood Dreams and Publicity Machines

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 12:54pm
Peter Labuza, University of Southern California

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference
Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

The irony of the title A Star Is Born is no longer surprising, as new histories have examined the way that publicity before, during, and after the Hollywood Classical Cinema has changed and developed the reception of films, stars, and more. While studying films can tell us much about the way they figure into larger histories, studying the way studios, agencies, and other distributors have presented and sold their work to the public can reveal much about both the economic and social issues of the time.

[UPDATE] Ruth Rendell: Special Issue of Contemporary Women's Writing on Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine

updated: 
Monday, August 10, 2015 - 8:11am
Falmouth University

Ruth Rendell, who has recently died, was one of the most prolific and important female authors of the C20th/21st centuries, achieving many literary awards and honours, plus a Labour peerage. Her literary output, both as Ruth Rendell and Barbara Vine, transcended generic boundaries and conventional assumptions about character, the police procedural novel, class and gender, amongst many of her other concerns.

Museum Engagements in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature; NeMLA 2016; Hartford, CT; March 17-20, 2016 [UPDATE]

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 5:11pm
NeMLA 2016

The rise of the modern museum was (and remains) a global event that resonates across literary cultures. Germain Bazin termed the nineteenth century the "Museum Age" for the myriad ways the new phenomenon of the public museum redefined the social status of art. This session investigates how this development was received by nineteenth- and twentieth-century Anglophone authors writing during and immediately following the rise of the modern museum.

CFP: CCLA Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively 28-30 May, 2016

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 4:09pm
Canadian Comparative Literature Association

CFP: Congress 2016—Engaging Communities Comparatively

Knowledge and understandings of shared values are created based on our respect for difference and diversity and our engagement with the communities we live in. A focus on connections between the individual, the local and the global can provoke new ways of thinking.

Cities of the Future - NeMLA Conference 2016 - Hartford, CT

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 1:54pm
Matthew Lambert / Carnegie Mellon University

This panel seeks to explore representations of futuristic cities from all periods in American literature, film, and other cultural mediums. In particular, it seeks papers responding to one or more of the following questions: In what ways have American writers and filmmakers envisioned future urban landscapes? In what ways have these visions changed over the course of American history and why? How have urban theorists, critics, and reformers as well as particular ideologies (Christian, technocratic, socialist, libertarian, environmentalist, etc.) shaped them? In what ways do the past and present (or the erasure of the past and/or present) affect their depictions?

Hartford and Antebellum American Writing

updated: 
Sunday, August 9, 2015 - 12:36am
NEMLA: 3/17-3/20, 2016

The reputations of Hartford, Connecticut, residents Harriet Beecher Stowe and Mark Twain overshadow the city's antebellum authors. NeMLA 2016 seems ideally situated for a session to raise the academic appreciation and profile of earlier writers who contributed to Hartford's historical literary legacy, which includes Lydia Sigourney, Ann Plato, abolitionist ministers like Lyman Beecher and Amos G. Beman, and Hartford-born pamphlet writer Maria Stewart. Hartford was also a publishing center with a young Samuel G. Goodrich and later, Lewis Skinner, who printed Rev. James C. Pennington's book about African and African American history; lexicographer-journalist Noah Webster was of West Hartford, and The Charter Oak, was Hartford's anti-slavery newspaper.

The Evidence of Realism (deadline 9/23/15; ACLA, Harvard 3/17-20/16)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:39pm
Geoffrey Baker

The Evidence of Realism

[For the annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association at Harvard University, March 17-20 2016]

How do texts--and especially realist texts--and their plots use or complicate the idea of evidence? What sort of evidence do such texts seem to assume readers require in order to encounter the "effect of the real"? And how do contemporaneous ideas of evidence from philosophy, legal theory, or science provide context for the consideration of evidence in literary works?

Rethinking National Foundations: Using/Abusing History (ACLA 2016; March 17-20; Cambridge, MA)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 2:17pm
Meredith Malburne-Wade (Gettysburg College) / ACLA 2016

Foundational texts, events, and people influence our cultural and national personas. In the United States, for example, people may look to the Constitution and patriotic songs or even the bible as foundational texts--texts that define (and limit?) national identity. We often see events such as the Salem Witch Trials, the Civil War, and the Civil Rights Movement as critical moments of national formation, while people such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr. represent quintessential "Americans.". These foundational texts, events, and people work their way into literature and pop culture in myriad ways as authors, writers, poets, filmmakers and playwrights incorporate, reify, or challenge them through their works.

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

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