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Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice; October 31, 2014

updated: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017 - 10:38am
Patricia Bostian/Central Piedmont Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice (TALTP), a peer-reviewed open source online journal, is accepting articles for our Winter 2014 special issue, Who Is Teaching U.S.? We are interested in articles by instructors and their experiences in teaching American literature in countries outside the United States. How are the classic and contemporary American authors taught and received in other countries? What are the difficulties? The benefits? Any issue pertaining to teaching American literature is welcome, from assignment creation, gender issues, difficulties with translations, to first-hand accounts of both successes and failures.

(Extended) Matters of Sensation

updated: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017 - 3:02pm
Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 14, 2017

Matters of Sensation
Call for Submissions - Graduate Conference

Georgia State University
Atlanta, GA
November 2-4, 2017

Keynotes: Dr. Amber Jamilla Musser (Washington University in St. Louis)
&
Angela Washko (Carnegie Mellon University)

Humor and Violence in the African-American Imagination

updated: 
Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 6:17pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This session welcomes papers that will investigate the range of comedic forms embedded within African American literature. On the heels of the twentieth anniversary of the release of Saidiya Hartman’s seminal monograph Scenes of Subjection, this panel’s exploration of the use of humor in black literature offers a new critical framework for exploring the ways that spectacles of violence have continued to undergird representations of black performance in contemporary critical thought. From the auction block to the jazz stage, “blackness” manifests epidermally and externally, often through public articulations of shared racial grief. As such, recent critical work has often framed humor as a tactical response to racial violence.

Pop South: Consuming the Region (SAMLA 2017)

updated: 
Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 6:19pm
Emerging Scholars Organization of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 16, 2017

POP SOUTH: CONSUMING THE REGION (South Atlanta Modern Language Assocation, November 3 -5, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia)

 

Urban Souths (SAMLA 2017)

updated: 
Sunday, June 11, 2017 - 6:19pm
Emerging Scholars Organization of the Society for the Study of Southern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 16, 2017

CFP: Urban Souths (South Atlantic Modern Language Assocation, November 3 - 5, 2017 in Atlanta, Georgia)

 

Seeking Review Articles for Canadian Review of American Studies

updated: 
Thursday, June 8, 2017 - 6:09pm
Canadian Review of American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 31, 2017

Canadian Review of American Studies, a journal published by the University of Toronto, is seeking review articles for upcoming issues. Typically, a review article surveys three recently published books that explore similar or intersecting themes, summarizing the main issues raised between texts and offering a critical perspective of the given field. If interested, please provide a brief paragraph (250 words max) outlining your review article including the three books intended for review. Editors will make selections based on these proposals following the submission deadline. If selected, the Reviews Editor will provide desk copies from the publisher for your review article.

A Family Matter: A Study of August Wilson’s Plays

updated: 
Sunday, July 16, 2017 - 1:55am
Annette M. Magid/SUNY Erie Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

August Wilson was a man of vision. While Wilson was committed to portraying the “richness and resilience of the twentieth-century black American life through the medium of drama,”[1] he also set the stage for all Americans to examine their purpose and place in society. In addition to his stage portrayals, Wilson also presented his theories in his lectures such as, “The Ground on which I Stand,” where he identified himself as a “race man.” This focus brings up the question: How are his views on family matters presented in his lectures compared to those depicted in his plays?

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