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NeMLA Roundtable: "Beyond the Monster Inside: The Ethics of Fragmentation in the Long Nineteenth-Century": Due 9/30/15

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 3:36pm
NeMLA 2016: March 17-20, 2016

Doubles and doppelgangers abound in the Victorian Gothic novel and Miltonian readings have emphasized the inner monster as a nod to the period's desire to, in Tennyson's terms, "Move upward, working out the Beast, / And let the ape and tiger die" (In Memoriam). How does the trope of doubleness figure in other nineteenth-century contexts beyond the Gothic and its subterraneous influence?

Panel: Visualizing Diversity in Children's Literature

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 11:55am
Diversity Committee, Children's Literature Association

Call for Papers
Visualizing Diversity in Children's Literature
Panel Sponsored by Children's Literature Association Diversity Committee
2016 Children's Literature Association Conference

1968 and Global Cinema - panel at SCMS Atlanta 2015 - Abstracts due AUG 5

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 9:46am
Society for Cinema and Media Studies

CfP- 2016 SCMS - 1968 + Global Cinema - 3/30-4/3/16 - Atlanta, Georgia

1968 and Global Cinema

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference

Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

Although scholarship exists on the late 1960s New Waves, especially on in French New Wave vis-à-vis May '68 in Paris, scholarship that puts cinemas on 1968 into dialogue with one another across national boundaries is surprisingly lacking.

The Unsettling Politics of Nineteenth-Century Print, Abstract Deadline August 20

Monday, July 20, 2015 - 5:01am
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

While earlier centuries had witnessed the global spread of print, the nineteenth century contributed a new major chapter to the history of print in the Atlantic world, a chapter full of unsettling ironies. In this century, print became more accessible, since printing offices, owing to improved printing technologies, effective dissemination channels, and low-cost formats, were able to produce more efficiently. With print more accessible and affordable, printed material soon developed into a product of mass consumption that formed an integral part of everyday culture in the nineteenth century. Consequently, nineteenth-century print generated new audiences throughout the Atlantic world, such as working-class, black, and female readers.

[UPDATE] "Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 9:06pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

The Novel and Digital Humanities: Seeking Teaching Tools (July 25)

Sunday, July 19, 2015 - 2:33pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website

The editorial team at Studies in the Novel is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website. I am seeking pedagogical content that addresses teaching novels using digital humanities tools/perspective. Please consider submitting sample course syllabi, specific assignments, short narrative descriptions of your own experiences, or other appropriate content. The next deadline for submission is July 25.

Proposed Edited Collection on American Women Writers and Liminality 10 Dec 2015

Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 3:03pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers


The Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW) is seeking abstracts (250 words) for essays (7500-8500 words, excluding notes) on American women writers and liminality for a proposed edited collection. We also seek a senior scholar in the field of American women writers to write the preface to the collection and, if interested, join the team as a co-editor.

CFP Anthology on Girl Labor (non-western and new media)

Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 1:45pm
Diana Anselmo-Sequeira

We are looking for original contributions for an anthology on the history of girl labor to be published by an American university press. We are seeking specifically for chapters that examine girl sex work and new media labor in non-western contexts.

Preferred topics include:

Girls and internet labor: blogging, gaming, lifestyle videos, micro-celebrities in non-western contexts

Girls and self-marketing in the web: seeking sponsorships, broadcasting one's image for profit

DIY cultures: Hello Kitty, "cute cultures," fashion, girls as producers of new consumer products

Gift cultures/ alternative markets/ hunter and gathering communities


Saturday, July 18, 2015 - 6:29am
Prof. Adam Barkman and Dr. Antonio Sanna

Tim Burton is certainly one of the most popular directors of contemporary Hollywood. His oeuvre includes blockbuster films such as Batman (1989), Planet of the Apes (2001) and Alice in Wonderland (2010) as well as less profitable– but still highly recognizable - films such as Ed Wood (1994). His work with stop motion, evident in Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), Tim Burton's Corpse Bride (2005) and the recent Frankenweenie (2013) has further popularized and updated a technique that has been fundamental in cinema since the silent era.

Looking for Public Humanities Pieces on "America"

Friday, July 17, 2015 - 8:55pm
'Merica Magazine: for the unlikely patriot......

It is our contention that a magazine like this has needed to exist for a while. There needs to be a home for the complicated patriot, the unlikely patriot.The sociologist Robert Bellah believed that the United States had a civil religion that was to be contrasted with that of other nations. If that's true – and we think it is – then this is a magazine for the agnostics. What can one say? America seems like a pretty good idea – we should try it some time.

To get what we're up to check out our website at (that's "Merica," not "America," lest you accidentally go to the other - though excellent - magazine of that name). Check out especially the "About" section and the "Submission" section for a fuller idea of our concept.