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Journal Seeks Prose and Poetry

updated: 
Sunday, July 12, 2015 - 11:04am
Lehigh Valley Vanguard

Submissions in PROSE

Generally, we're looking for people who want to critically examine our society through their writing. This can be done in a variety of ways.

We accept op-eds, book reviews, film reviews, television reviews, memoir narratives, flash fiction, art reviews, and open letters.

Some current topics for consideration:
Intersectional feminism
Working class rhetorics
The body as a site of radical change
Anarchist thought
Exploring masculinity
Critical pedagogy
Community activism
#BlackLivesMatter
Identity studies

Submissions can be 500-2,500 words. We welcome non-academic and even anti-academic writing.

LITERATURE TODAY: Call for submissions for October 2015 issue

updated: 
Saturday, July 11, 2015 - 12:34am
Literature Today

we are inviting submissions for
October 2015 issue of Literature Today. Theme of our October 2015
issue is 'Love'. You can send us poems, short stories and one act
plays on :

1. love at first sight
2. poem/story/one act play in memory of a loved one
3. love as an aesthetic experience
4. love and teenagers
5. love and romance as predestined event
6. love relationships and role of gods
7. love and marriage
8. love as illusion
9. love in the age of Internet
10. lovers as rebellions
11. platonic love
12. love and immortality
13. disappointment/deceit in love
14. lovers as saints
15 any other relevant theme related to love

Special Topic: Faith and Violence in Literature (Spring 2016)

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 9:06pm
Julie Ooms / Intégrité: A Journal of Faith and Learning (Missouri Baptist University)

Intégrité (pronounced IN tay gri tay) is a scholarly journal published twice a year by the Faith & Learning Committee and the Humanities Division of Missouri Baptist University, St. Louis, MO. Published both online (http://www.mobap.edu/integrite) and in print copy, it welcomes essays for a special issue (Spring 2016) on "Faith and Violence in Literature." Essays may explore the interaction between Christian faith and violence in individual works or writers, in issues concerning teaching such works and writers, and in the pedagogical tasks educators at faith-based institutions of higher learning face when discussing and reflecting on the use of violence.

C19- (Re)forming the Progressive Era

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 5:56pm
Laura Fisher and Autumn Womack- C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

The Progressive Era (1890-1920) occupies an unsettled place in Americanist literary studies, despite the period's claims to forward-looking progress. To some extent, this uneasy relationship to the discipline-- whose professional protocols, pedagogy, and scholarship often operates by means of century-based periodization-- reflects the period's own wildly unsettled nature.

[UPDATE] Reexamining the 1960s: Media, Politics, Culture Conference (proposals due 8/1/15)

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 5:53pm
Department of Film, Television and Digital Media, Texas Christian University

Deadline Reminder: Presentation proposals are due no later than Saturday, August 1, 2015 for the Reexamining the 1960s: Media, Politics, Culture Conference (to be held at Texas Christian University, in Fort Worth, Texas, November 6-7, 2015).

The conference organizers are seeking historically and theoretically intriguing presentations that explore any noteworthy aspect(s) of media, politics, and/or culture during the 1960s, whether in the United States or elsewhere. This gathering promises to provide an intellectually stimulating investigation into the complex phenomenon that was "The Sixties." Accordingly, participants are encouraged to interpret the conference theme quite broadly and innovatively.

CFP: New Writing - international creative / critical writing journal (Routledge) - (8/1/15)

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 12:05pm
New Writing: the International Journal for the Practice and Theory of Creative Writing

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Call for Critical or Creative Work

"New Writing: the International Journal for the Practice and Theory" is open for submissions for Volume 12 (Issue 12.3, in 2015) and Volume 13 (13.1, 13.2, 13.3, 2016).

The journal considers critical work relating to Creative Writing practice and the critical examination of Creative Writing. Strong pedagogically focused papers are considered.

Creative work (in any genre) is also welcome.

Word length and submission guidelines at: www.newwriting.org.uk

Submissions welcome via this journal submission site.

Seeking Teaching Tools Submissions for Studies in the Novel

updated: 
Friday, July 10, 2015 - 11:59am
Claire Barber-Stetson

Studies in the Novel is seeking pedagogical content for inclusion in the "Teaching Tools" section of its website. Content should address approaches to teaching either 20th- and 21st-century novels or interdisciplinary approaches to teaching novels, in general.

Submissions may include sample course syllabi, assignments, or short reflections on a "teachable moment"—a passage, a conflict, a scene, a pattern of meaning, or a character—from a novel. See https://studiesinthenovel.org/interact/teaching-tools.html for sample submissions and the complete guidelines.

Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Graphic Novels and World Literature Teaching Tools (July 27)

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 10:50pm
Studies in the Novel Affiliate Website: Teaching Tools

The editorial team at _Studies in the Novel_ is seeking content for its online archive of indexed teaching tools on the journal's affiliate website: https://studiesinthenovel.org/interact/teaching-tools.html

I am currently seeking pedagogical materials related to Graphic Novels and World Literature such as syllabi, assignments, textual reflections, etc.

This is a continuous project with monthly opportunities to submit.

"Public Scholarship and Activism: Communities, Practices, and Battlegrounds" roundtable session

updated: 
Thursday, July 9, 2015 - 3:27pm
Amy Brady / NeMLA 2016

The link(s) between academia and activism are nothing if not complex. In many ways, the academy rewards activist scholarship that challenges systemic inequality. Yet, as recent articles and testimonies in the Chronicle demonstrate, some scholars – especially those who make their activism public – are punished by their institutions and shamed by public audiences. In light of these potential consequences, how and where do 21st century scholar-activists pursue their activism? Why do they participate in public activism, and should they?

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