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SCMS 2016 - Hollywood Dreams and Publicity Machines

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 7:28pm
Peter Labuza, University of Southern California

Society for Cinema and Media Studies Annual Conference
Hilton Atlanta, March 30 - April 3, 2016

The irony of the title A Star Is Born is no longer surprising, as new histories have examined the way that publicity before, during, and after the Hollywood Classical Cinema has changed and developed the reception of films, stars, and more. While studying films can tell us much about the way they figure into larger histories, studying the way studios, agencies, and other distributors have presented and sold their work to the public can reveal much about both the economic and social issues of the time.

Disability in the Visual Sphere--abstract due 9/30/15, conference 3/17-20, 2016

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 6:13pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

This panel seeks to explore the category of disability as something that is perceived and performed in the visual sphere. Papers might include discussions of voyeurism, spectacles and spectatorship, self-fashioning, visual art, undetectable or ambiguous disability, the body as evidence, erasure and exposure, sensory impairment, perception and interpretation, and questions of legibility and truth. Open to scholars working in any geographical region or period.

Please submit abstracts up to 300 words with a short (1-2 sentence) bio. DO NOT EMAIL YOUR ABSTRACT. You must go through the NeMLA site:

UPDATE: Extended Deadline: Monstrous Messengers 17 Aug. 2015

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 4:45pm
Leslie Ormandy

For this collection, three more papers from any discipline are welcome; however, advantaged are those focusing on a gendered or religious moral message. And I am looking for ONE paper which is willing to argue that the monsters represented are simply that, monsters, and that utilizing them as a tool toward acceptance of diversity is not a good thing. The latter is, I understand, a controversial view. This book wishes to explore all views and not promote one view by excluding another.

Local and Global Transgressions in Art and Literature, NeMLA, 2016, Hartford CT

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2015 - 8:54am
Daniel M. Scott III and Irma Maini/ USACLALS

United States Association for Commonwealth Literature and Language Studies (USACLALS) panel on Local and Global Transgressions invites papers that address transgression in literature and art as well as transgressive art in general. The panel seeks to explore the complexity of transgression as it crosses cultural boundaries in terms of both production and reception. Papers are encouraged to consider but not limited to the following aspects:

Queer Intimacies, Queer Spaces, & Scales of Desire

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 3:08pm
NEMLA 2016

Queer Intimacies, Queer Spaces, & Scales of Desire

This panel is searching for papers that address how LGBTQ* texts of the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries construct varieties of queer intimacy and attempt to anatomize the epistemological, formal, and affective structures that make such intimacies possible—whether in public or private. We are looking for papers that discuss the ways queerness operates in a variety of spaces: city streets, forest clearings, parks, gardens, restrooms, bedrooms, manor homes, and apartment buildings.

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 12:34pm
Birkbeck, University of London

Concentrate! A Symposium on Attention and Distraction in Medicine and Culture
30th October 2015
Birkbeck, University of London

"Though it is in the first place a faculty of individual minds, it is clear that attention has also become an acute collective problem of modern life—a cultural problem." -- Matthew B. Crawford, The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction (2015)

NeMLA 2016: "Food and Feast in Post-Medieval Outlaw Literature"

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:43am
Alexander L. Kaufman

This session will present new work from scholars in an emerging line of inquiry: post-medieval outlaw narratives and the textual and cultural relevance of feasting and eating. This session purposefully reaches beyond the Middle Ages to demonstrate that outlawry is a global phenomenon, one that is not only present in a variety of literatures, languages, and cultures, but also one that is inherently intertwined with food and feast. While outlawry has its formal origins in the Middle Ages, the outlaw is a figure and trope present in many post-medieval texts: several Renaissance dramas, and especially American, Native American, African American, and Australian outlaw narratives.

The Archive and African American Literature in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:19am
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

In an age when technology and digitalization continue to redefine how we think about and explore African American literature, this panel invites considerations of the critical yet ever-evolving relationship between the archive and African American literary production. While possible papers might explore the role of traditional institutional collections in informing us about particular writers and periods, the panel also welcomes broad and open interpretation of the term "archive." How do texts, bodies, and performances function as archives? How does collecting, cataloguing, and curating impact modern racial formation? What is the relationship between the archive and pedagogy? How does the archive relate to contemporary discussions of post-blackness?

Use, Abuse, Abstinence: Reading Alcohol in Literature | NEMLA 2016, March 17-20 | Submission Deadline Sept. 30, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:08am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel calls for papers that stake a claim in the cultural significance of representing alcohol or alcohol consumption. How do these representations relate to alcoholism as a disease and the alcoholic as an identity category? Does the text evaluate alcohol abuse morally or politically? Do communities organized around alcohol consumption facilitate social movements based on class, race, sexuality, or gender?

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