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[UPDATE] ASA 2015 -- "Blackness and the Miseries of Law" (DEADLINE EXTENDED)

updated: 
Friday, January 9, 2015 - 9:21am
American Studies Association

In the wake of the deaths of Michael Brown, Aiyana Jones, Eric Garner, John Crawford, Tamir Price, Ezell Ford, and too many others, and the ostensible inability of the law or the legal system to provide something resembling "justice" in the aftermath of these deaths by police violence, it is impossible not to consider the implications of a legally imposed condition of misery on Black bodies in the U.S. This panel takes up the meeting's call to consider a "long and changing past" of misery by asking how the historical imbrication of U.S. law and race - most obvious and yet still most crucial to analyze in slavery - further structures conditions of misery for Black Americans.

[Abstract Deadline: 30 March 2015] Silence: A Semiotics of (in)Significance, University of Liverpool, 1-3 July 2015

updated: 
Friday, January 9, 2015 - 4:57am
Nick Davis, University of Liverpool

Silence: A Semiotics of (in)Significance, University of Liverpool, 1-3 July 2015

Speakers:

Natasha Alden (English & Creative Writing, Aberystwyth University)

Bernard Beatty (Literature & Theology, Universities of Liverpool & St Andrews)

Erik Grayson (Literature, Wartburg College)

David Lewin (Education Studies, Liverpool)

Paivi Miettunen (Medicine & Art, University of Calgary)

Fiona Tolan (Literature, Liverpool John Moores University)

Call For Papers – Auto/Fiction- Open Issue

updated: 
Friday, January 9, 2015 - 2:27am
IAFA

The issue is open to all kinds of applied and theoretical papers on autofiction. Contributions should be written in English and may vary in length from 3000 to 12000 words. Reviews should not be more than 1000 words. In addition to scholarly papers we invite contributions in the form of book reviews, calls for papers, announcements of conferences etc. All contributions must adhere to the MLA style sheet (7th Edition) with an abstract and key words.

All methods and approaches are welcome. Potential themes include but are not limited to:

(Re)presentation: Problematizing Authenticity-- St. John's University Graduate English Conference March 28, 2015

updated: 
Thursday, January 8, 2015 - 7:34pm
St. John's University English Department

With an increasing interest for a globalized and diverse society, the quest for an authentic self is more readily apparent and therefore further conflates the problem of representation. Globalization expands beyond social media and encroaches on the realms of the public and private spheres. However, the process of authenticity only further stabilizes potentially harmful ideologies that promote illusions of truth. In some instances, language (literature), film, and art, because of their figurative element, expose the artificiality of representation and engage the issue of authenticity. How are certain claims to truth (authenticity/referentiality) formulated, regulated, and destabilized through representation in literature, film, and art?

The Rented Room, SSAWW 2015 Conference (Nov. 4-8)

updated: 
Thursday, January 8, 2015 - 4:34pm
Society for the Study of American Women Writers

A good deal of scholarship has taken up the gendered dynamics of public and private space, and more recently, work in twentieth century literature has begun problematizing the idea of a "divide" in favor of moving toward a spectrum of private, semi-private, semi-public, and public. Despite this, little scholarship has examined spaces that occupy an ambivalent position, simultaneously public and private or the gender dynamics that govern these spaces.

The Text in Flux: Human, Animal, Cyborg, Machine: 18 April 2015; Deadline for Submissions: 14 March 2015

updated: 
Thursday, January 8, 2015 - 1:28pm
Annual Graduate English Conference at Southern Connecticut State University

Dr Vara Neverow neverowv1@southernct.edu
The Text in Flux: Human, Animal, Cyborg, Machine
Saturday, 18 April 2015
9:00am-4:30pm
(Registration and Continental Breakfast 8:30pm)
English Department
Engelman Hall D-Wing
Southern Connecticut State University
New Haven, CT 06515
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS 14 MARCH 2015
Call for Papers:

MadLit 2015 - "Dirty Talk: The Forms and Language of Pleasure" EXTENDED DEADLINE: Jan. 15

updated: 
Thursday, January 8, 2015 - 11:45am
University of Wisconsin-Madison

The 11th Annual Graduate Conference on Language and Literature
at the University of Wisconsin-Madison // February 26-28, 2015

Dirty talk. Guilty pleasure. Darkest desire. Our everyday discourse is littered with phrases that shun or shame the pleasurable. Yet seeking pleasure, as figures from Chaucer to Freud have argued, is a basic human instinct. Scholarship across a variety of fields has gravitated toward humanity's complex relationship with pleasure.

Late 19th / Early 20th C. Lit, English & American -- RMMLA 2015 (Santa Fe, 10/8-10/10/15)

updated: 
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 - 11:58pm
Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association

The Rocky Mountain Modern Language Association is calling for papers for its 69th annual convention! This Special Topics panel on late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century English and American literature has returned for another year of discovery and discussion. This time around, the panel should center on prose, poetry, or theater from the 1870s-1930s that, in some measure, had been "based on a true story" or had engaged with the notion that "truth is stranger than fiction." We welcome presentations pertaining to historical fiction, true-crime fiction, auto/biographical fiction, memoir, travelogue, satire, or other kinds of writing -- published in a variety of venues -- depicting or otherwise representing actual persons or events.

RADICAL WRITES: COMPOSITION, CREATIVE AND CRITICAL WRITING, AND NEW MEDIA Submission deadline extended to January 19

updated: 
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 - 3:38pm
Arkansas State University, Southeast Missouri State University, and the Midwest Graduate Students Conference on Writing

RADICAL WRITES:
COMPOSITION, CREATIVE AND CRITICAL WRITING, AND NEW MEDIA
KEYNOTE SPEAKER: JENNIFER FINNEY BOYLAN
ARKANSAS STATE UNIVERSITY, JONESBORO, AR

The Radical Writes Conference is a graduate student conference that highlights writers who produce innovative and distinctive creative and critical work in its multitude of forms. Students are welcome to submit poetry, creative nonfiction, and fiction or works pertaining to composition and rhetoric, critical theory, literature, and related fields of study. In addition to conference participants' presentations, conference attendees can expect panels on topics related to professionalization and opportunities for networking with publishers.

Resisting the Nation, Reproducing Colonial Misery: Sports and the Transnational Imaginary (ASA 2015)

updated: 
Wednesday, January 7, 2015 - 12:59pm
American Studies Association, Annual Meeting of the American Studies Association. (October 8-11, 2015. Toronto, Canada.)

In 1844, Canada and the USA played a cricket match at the St. George's Club in New York, which is now the site for NYU's Medical Centre. This long-forgotten match was the first international sporting event of the modern era, predating the revival of the Olympic Games by more than 50 years. Since then, cricket's place in the cultural imaginary of North America has been displaced by the emergence of baseball and hockey as the national sports of the USA and Canada. This piece of historical trivia serves as a line of departure for the panel to investigate how sports have engaged with—by perpetuating, resisting, institutionalizing—the hegemonic narratives of the nation-state.

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