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The Evidence of Realism (deadline 9/23/15; ACLA, Harvard 3/17-20/16)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 9:39pm
Geoffrey Baker

The Evidence of Realism

[For the annual meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association at Harvard University, March 17-20 2016]

How do texts--and especially realist texts--and their plots use or complicate the idea of evidence? What sort of evidence do such texts seem to assume readers require in order to encounter the "effect of the real"? And how do contemporaneous ideas of evidence from philosophy, legal theory, or science provide context for the consideration of evidence in literary works?

Rethinking National Foundations: Using/Abusing History (ACLA 2016; March 17-20; Cambridge, MA)

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 2:17pm
Meredith Malburne-Wade (Gettysburg College) / ACLA 2016

Foundational texts, events, and people influence our cultural and national personas. In the United States, for example, people may look to the Constitution and patriotic songs or even the bible as foundational texts--texts that define (and limit?) national identity. We often see events such as the Salem Witch Trials, the Civil War, and the Civil Rights Movement as critical moments of national formation, while people such as George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King, Jr. represent quintessential "Americans.". These foundational texts, events, and people work their way into literature and pop culture in myriad ways as authors, writers, poets, filmmakers and playwrights incorporate, reify, or challenge them through their works.

Call for papers and creative writing August 31, 2015

updated: 
Saturday, August 8, 2015 - 12:57pm
the quint: an interdisciplinary journal from the north

The quint's twenty eigth issue is issuing a call for theoretically informed and historically grounded submissions of scholarly interest—as well as creative writing, original art, interviews, and reviews of books.  The deadline for this call is 31st August 2015—but please note that we accept manu/digi-scripts at any time.

All contributions accompanied by a short biography will be forwarded to a member of the editorial board. Manuscripts must not be previously published or submitted for publication elsewhere while being reviewed by the quint's editors or outside readers.

Hard copies of manuscripts should be sent to Dr. Sue Matheson at the quint, University College of the North, P.O. Box 3000, The Pas, Manitoba, Canada, R9A 1M7.

The Afterlives of Nineteenth-Century Medicine (March 10-13, 2016)

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 12:24pm
INCS 2016 (Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies)

From sympathetic contagion to animal magnetism, nervous physiology to cell theory and germ theory, nineteenth-century medical theory and practice imagined human embodiment in open relation to the environmental, economic, religious, and political forces that shape historical experience. Often represented in both cultural and physiological terms, disease functioned as both sign and symptom of the irrevocable togetherness of mind and body, something to be combatted morally and technologically by prudence and enlightened reason.

[UPDATE] CFP: "Moved by the Spirit, Authorized by God: Black Women Activists and Religion" NEMLA Mar 17-20, 2016, Hartford. CT

updated: 
Friday, August 7, 2015 - 9:34am
Jami Carlacio, Borough of Manhattan CC/CUNY

Since the era of slavery and continuing through the present, Black women have articulated a vision of freedom, equality, anti-racism, and racial uplift, drawing from Scripture to sustain their work of promoting equal rights for African Americans. From the early female abolitionists such as Maria Stewart, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman, to the anti-lynching activists Ida B. Wells and Mary Talbert, to the twentieth-century civil rights activists Ella Josephine Baker and Septima Clark, and countless others, these "churchwomen" actively challenged the status quo that relegated Black women to the least empowered positions in the social order.

Adolescence in Film and Television (March 21-25, 2016; Proposals due October 1, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 11:10pm
Popular Culture/American Culture Association

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture/American Culture Association Conference, to be held March 21-25, 2016 in Seattle, Washington.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels.

Update: Gender and Class Representation in U.S. Culture, NeMLA, Hartford, 3/17-3/20

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 3:57pm
47th Northeast Modern Language Association Convention

This panel investigates the contemporary meaning of gender and class in film and literature in the United States. While authors such as Sheryl Sandberg and Hannah Rosin focus on women in the professional ranks to argue for women's prominence in U.S. culture and stories of professional women dominate the media, few stories of working-class women have emerged to challenge the symbolic dominance of the white male worker and breadwinner. As work, families, and genders have changed, how has this symbolism been reinforced or challenged in literature and film?

The New Literary Anxiety (ACLA 2016 Seminar Proposal, March 17th-20th, Harvard University)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:44pm
Elizabeth Oldfather, University of Colorado,Colorado Springs; Rebecca Soares, Arizona State University

The melancholic poet, the neurasthenic female reader, the man of artistic temperament: these heavily typed figures, each coded in the medical and psychological discourse of its own time, together bespeak a longstanding cultural connection between anxiety and literature. Sianne Ngai, in Ugly Feelings, even tentatively identifies anxiety as "the distinctive 'feeling-tone' of intellectual inquiry itself" – a signifying trope of bookish existence. But what might this connection between literature and anxiety mean after the advent of psychopharmacology, of neurodiversity awareness, of classroom trigger warnings?

"Catch if you can your country's moment": The Poetry of Current Events, NeMLA, Mar. 17-20, 2016, Hartford. Proposals by Sept. 30

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 1:04pm
William Waddell

If literature is, as Pound said, "news that stays news," then perhaps poetry is always a matter of current events, but recently, books like Claudia Rankine's Citizen or Brian Turner's Here, Bullet, to name just two, have taken on contemporary public moments, current events in common parlance, and in the process sparked a different kind of conversation.

[UPDATE] Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation (Nov 19-20, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, August 6, 2015 - 8:37am
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS: UPDATE

Words Unofficial: Gossip, Circulation, Mediation
University of Chicago English Graduate Conference
November 19-20, 2015

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Susan Phillips, Northwestern University
Associate Professor of English and Alumnae of Northwestern Teaching Professor

Faculty Roundtable:
-Prof. Natasha Barnes, University of Illinois at Chicago
Associate Professor of African American Studies and English

-Prof. Peter Coviello, University of Illinois at Chicago
Professor of English

-Prof. Patrick Jagoda, University of Chicago
Assistant Professor of English

-Prof. Lynn Spigel, Northwestern University
Frances Willard Professor of Screen Cultures

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