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The Contemporary Novel at Work (2016 NeMLA Session)

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 2:30pm
47th Annual NeMLA Convention

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The Contemporary Novel at Work (2016 NeMLA Session)

47th Annual NeMLA Convention
Hartford, Connecticut—March 17 - 20, 2016

[UPDATE] What's Love Got to Do with it: Theory, Desire, and Performance (ACLA, Harvard, 3/17-3/20/16; deadline 9/23/15)

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 1:48pm
Yomaira Figueroa (Michigan State University), Carolyn Ureña (Rutgers University)

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American Comparative Literature Association 2016 Conference
Harvard University
March 17-20, 2016

Deadline for abstracts: Sept 23, 2015
Submissions portal is live: http://www.acla.org/seminar/what%E2%80%99s-love-got-do-it-theory-desire-...

What does love make us do? How is love understood outside of hegemonic contexts?

Acacia Group's Philip K. Dick Conference April 29-30

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 1:16pm
The Acacia Group at California State University Fullerton

Call for Papers for the Acacia Group's Philip K. Dick Conference to be held at Cal State Fullerton, April 29-30, 2016. Confirmed Special Guests: Dr. Ursula Heise, Jonathan Lethem, Tim Powers and James Blaylock.

Deadline for proposals: Interested individuals should submit a titled, 250-word abstract and complete contact information—name, institutional affiliation (if applicable), mail and email addresses, and telephone number—by December 1st, 2015. Submission email: dsandner@fullerton.edu

Our theme: Philip K. Dick, Here and Now.

Feminist Pedagogy: Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association in Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

updated: 
Thursday, September 3, 2015 - 1:10pm
Kathleen Alves/CUNY

Feminist Pedagogy in the Two-Year College

How do two-year college instructors put feminist theory into pedagogical practice? This roundtable discusses forms of feminist pedagogy in the community college classroom. Participants are invited to share methods and ideas of pedagogy for teaching in women and gender studies and/or feminist approaches to learning and classroom strategies across the disciplines. Papers should aim to address gender and sexuality issues, along with race and class, within and outside the rapidly transforming academic space of the two-year college.

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 8:46pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).

[UPDATE] UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference: Mad Love

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 6:59pm
UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Students

UCLA Comparative Literature Graduate Student Conference
Mad Love
February 19-20, 2016

Keynote Speaker: Lynn Enterline (Vanderbilt University)
Plenary Speakers: Julian Gutierrez-Albilla (USC); Jeffrey Sacks (UC Riverside)

The uneasy boundary between madness and love asserts itself throughout recorded history. The shifting relationship between these two phenomena exists across most (if not all) societies and epochs, particularly in literature and art. From lovesickness in the Middle Ages, to nymphomania and hysteria in the Enlightenment, to the stalker in modern-day horror films, the line between love and madness is continually conflated, contested, and blurred.

"Laboring, Loafing, and Languishing": Work and Identity in Antebellum American Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 1, 2015 - 4:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Hartford, CT March 17-20 2016

In 1784, Benjamin Franklin writes of Americans "[we] do not inquire concerning a stranger, what is he? But, what can he do?" When the first Europeans settled the shores of what is now the United States, hard work was necessary for the very survival of the small communities, yet since then, the notion of hard work and a strong "work ethic" has passed into American consciousness as a (if not the) defining virtue of both an individual's identity and of national identity. This panel seeks papers exploring what literary work produced in "Antebellum America" (roughly 1820-1861) has to say about this idea of hard work as the primary shaper of both individual and national identity.

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