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[CFP] Special Issue of TEXT on 'Gothic Writing'

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 5:19pm
Dr Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Dr Kimberley McMahon-Coleman

In recent years, Gothic Studies has evolved into a solid field of enquiry. 'Gothic' as a critical term has the potential to bring together perspectives from many areas within the cultural studies umbrella, with both an innovative and canonically-informed focus on literary forms and the writing process. Numerous incarnations of the Gothic mode can be found in multiple literary genres all over the world, from fiction to non-fiction, showing multiple forms and nuances. These different manifestations are not only typical of the geographical region in which they originate, but also provide proof of the interdisciplinary nature of the Gothic itself.

Ashgate Studies in Childhood: 1700 to the Present (no deadline; book series)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 1:20pm
Ann Donahue, Ashgate Publishing

Series Editor: Claudia Nelson, Texas A&M University
This series recognizes and supports innovative work on the child and on
literature for children and adolescents that informs teaching and engages
with current and emerging debates in the field. Proposals are welcome for
interdisciplinary and comparative studies by humanities scholars working in
a variety of fields, including literature; book history, periodicals
history, and print culture and the sociology of texts; theater, film,
musicology, and performance studies; history, including the history of
education; gender studies; art history and visual culture; cultural studies;
and religion.

Two Panel Call For Papers - Border Crossings and Revolutions

updated: 
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 - 1:16pm
2016 Irish Association for American Studies/British Association of American Studies Conference

Two Panel Call For Papers at the 2016 Irish Association for American Studies/British Association of American Studies Conference at Queen's University, Belfast (7-9 April 2016)

Border Crossings and Revolutions

"Daddy, What did you Do in the Culture Wars?": Academia and Public Life - NeMLA 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 11:27pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association - Hartford CT, March 17-20, 1016

It's been almost thirty years since Allan Bloom made his clarion call to classicism within the American academy with the publication of The Closing of the American Mind. For as moribund as the humanities have supposedly been (according to positivist scientists, economics majors, and higher education administrators) the "Culture Wars" have surely blazed a bright path across the consciousness of any literature, history, philosophy, theology or cultural studies major. Columnists from William Safire to David Brooks have bemoaned the supposed death of the humanities (while conveniently ignoring how supply-side economics has had a hearty role in that) identifying a "post-modern bogeyman" as being responsible for the murder.

"Reimagining City Politics From the Margins"/ panel for ALA symposium "City and American Literature/ Abstract Deadline 7/28/15

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 11:22pm
The University of Miami

This panel welcomes papers that explore how contemporary literary genres attempt to think through the traditionally raced and class divided formulations (and representations) of the neoliberal city-scape. We particularly invite presenters to consider creative works that destabilize the city as the ultimate signifier of minority cultures and reimagine the spatial expanse of minority resistance. Other themes that panelists might address in their work include, but are not limited to:

ideology and effect of 'urban renewal' /gentrification/displacements and dispossessions
urban discourse of raced deviance
new immigrant destinations

call for articles: Scritture migranti #8

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 11:18pm
Scritture migranti: rivista di scambi interculturali

The Editorial Board of Scritture migranti: rivista di scambi interculturali is now accepting articles for its 8/2014 issue. Interested scholars should send their contributions, along with an abstract and a short bio (in a MS-Word file) to redazione.scritturemigranti@unibo.it. Deadline for submissions: SEPTEMBER 1, 2015.

Scritture migranti particularly welcomes contributions which are innovative as to themes, subjects, methodologies, and theoretical approaches relevant to the multiple intersections of writing and migration. Articles in any of the major languages of international exchange are accepted.

CFPanelists: "Unsettling the Slave Narrative" (C19 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 23, 2015 - 8:07pm
C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists

This proposed panel seeks to present new and challenging perspectives on the history of the slave narrative genre. Recent studies have sought to recontextualize and/or reconsider the generic contours of the Anglo-American slave narrative. For example, Daphne Brooks has suggested the development of a "sonic slave narrative"; Nicole Aljoe and Ian Finseth have drawn attention to the "journeys" of the form in the early Americas; Deborah Jenson has highlighted popular sources from the Haitian Revolutionary period; John MacKay has written comparatively about the autobiographical writings of American slaves and Russian serfs.

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