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CFP: Journal of Narrative Theory: Special Issue: Dis/enabling Narratives

updated: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 11:19am
Journal of Narrative Theory

Journal of Narrative Theory invites submissions that further the discussion of disabling and enabling narratives from a disability studies perspective. JNT is a forum for the theoretical exploration of individual narrative texts and of the intersections between narrative, history, ideology, and culture more broadly.

The Power of/in Academia: Critical Interventions in Knowledge Production and Society

updated: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 6:59am
International Graduate Conference 2015 of the Cluster of Excellence “The Formation of Normative Orders”

Knowledge production and social transformation are closely intertwined. Academic scholarship plays a crucial role in analyzing and critiquing social, economic, ecological, and political developments, while simultaneously, however, being inextricably linked to its social context and its inherent relations of power and domination. Scrutinizing the link between social critique and scholarship also entails the critical examination of the tools applied in analyzing social phenomena, which in turn lay the basis for academic social critique. Scientific methods of gaining knowledge not only co-constitute and shape the object of research, but also the kind of knowledge that is produced.

25 Years of Affrilachian Resistance: Black Cultural Production in the Appalachian Region

updated: 
Thursday, May 21, 2015 - 5:17am
Shauna Morgan Kirlew/SAMLA

Next year marks the 25th anniversary of the Affrilachian Poets, a cadre of writers including Frank X Walker, Nikky Finney, Ricardo Nazario Colon, Mitchell L.H. Douglas, Kelly Norman Ellis, Crystal Wilkinson, Crystal Good, and Bianca Spriggs, among many others who continue to shape the literary landscape of the American South. Co-founder, Frank X Walker coined the term "Affrilachia" in an effort to "[challenge] the notion of a homogeneous all-white literary landscape" in Appalachia, and the collective has, indeed, spent two and half decades not only producing work which continues to mount a formidable movement against the myth of an all-white region but also documenting the nuanced realities of an ever expanding global South.

MLA Options for Teaching Volume on Teaching Space, Place, and Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 1:22pm
Robert T. Tally Jr.

Essay proposals are invited for Teaching Space, Place, and Literature, a volume in the MLA's Options for Teaching series to be edited by Robert T. Tally, Jr. This volume aims to survey a broad expanse of literary critical, theoretical, and historical territory in presenting both an introduction to teaching spatial literary studies and an essential guide to scholarly research being conducted in this burgeoning field. Exploring key topics and pedagogical strategies for teaching issues of space, place, and mapping in literary and cultural studies, this volume will include valuable information for both specialists and nonspecialists in spatiality studies, and the essays should be of interest to teachers of undergraduate- and graduate-level courses.

Call for Submissions to a Special Issue of the Journal of Popular Film and Television on Holmes Onscreen (Tentative Title)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 7:32am
Tom Ue, Department of English, University College London

Heralded by The Telegraph as a 'global phenomenon,' BBC's Sherlock is now one of the most commercially and critically successful television series of all time. The global recognition of Sherlock, combined with the recent discovery of Arthur Berthelet's 1916 silent film Sherlock Holmes starring William Gillette in his only screen appearance as the famous sleuth, makes it especially timely for film scholars, students, and audiences to reassess the cultural legacy of Holmes onscreen. Forthcoming work by Hills (2016) and Poore (2016) argue strongly for Holmes as a continuing source of scholarly interest, spurring us to look at Holmes' filmic lives.

HBCUstory Symposium 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, May 20, 2015 - 6:19am
Crystal A. deGregory, Ph.D./ HBCUstory, Inc.

HBCUstory Symposium 2015 | Call for Papers
Theme | Reconstruction in an Age of Resistance: Respecting our Roots. Restoring our Rites.
Presented by | HBCUstory, Inc. + Fisk University

HBCUstory Inc., in partnership with the Fisk University, proudly presents the third annual HBCUstory SYMPOSIUM Oct. 9-10, 2015 in Nashville, Tennessee. Held in Nashville, Tennessee, a distinctively southern city that is home to four of the nation's 107 HBCUs, the two-day research and cultural symposium is first of its kind to convene Historically Black College and University (HBCU) researchers, presidents, administrators, faculty, staff, students, and alumni.

[UPDATE] Speculative Fiction – SAMLA - Deadline Extended

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 3:31pm
Lisa Wenger Bro / Middle Georgia State College

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres. The cohesive element that pulls works together is that there is some "unrealistic" element, whether it's magical, supernatural, or even a futuristic, technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way. For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from Gabriel García Márquez to H.P. Lovecraft to William Gibson. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.

HUMOROUS > DISRUPTIONS: Humour and Technologies of Disruption in Feminist Media Theory and Practice

updated: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2015 - 12:56pm
Synoptique: An Online Journal of Film and Moving Image Studies

With its insightful and quirky brand of humour, Issa Rae's popular web series The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl (2011- 2013) has shown how alternative pathways for the production, circulation and reception of interactive new media also makes possible a more expansive approach to the question of who and what can be funny. Much of the humour in Awkward Black Girl arises from the social ineptitude of J, its titular character. The series' characterization of her subjectivity as multi-layered and complex also prompts interrogation of gender and racial stereotypes through humour, and the ways in which digital platforms create opportunities for women and minority media-makers to develop their projects outside of mainstream media industries.

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