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THE GOOD LIFE IS OUT THERE SOMEWHERE: UNCOVERING UTOPIA IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY CANON

updated: 
Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 9:34am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 9, 2016

Though neither Mr. Thornton nor Mr. Bell evoke “Utopia” flatteringly in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North & South, each mention of the term situates the concept of utopianism at the center of the novel’s labour dispute and makes the reader wonder if Margaret Hale might not be a utopian heroine. Not considered a utopic text, North & South nevertheless engages itself in a conversation about utopianism (and dystopianism). This panel seeks papers re-reading non-utopic texts (or authors) from the nineteenth century as utopic. By June 9th, please submit a 200-word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Dan Abitz, Georgia State University, dabitz1@gsu.edu.

Appalachian Nature Writing and Ecocriticism Anthology

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 3:33pm
Jessica Cory
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 1, 2016

Appalachia, with its wealth of biodiversity, has yet to be properly recognized in an anthology that focuses on nature writing and Ecocriticism. This first-ever collection of Appalachian nature writing and schloarly criticism focusing on the Appalchian region and its literature will look at both the natural and post-natural world and the role the Appalachian region plays in such. 

Poetry, creative nonfiction, fiction, one-act plays, and ecocritical essays are welcomed. 

Submission Guidelines

Afrofuturism in Time and Space

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 3:33pm
Isiah Lavender III / Louisiana State University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 30, 2016

Co-editors Isiah Lavender III and Lisa Yaszek seek essays on black speculative art across centuries, continents, and cultures for a new collection called “Afrofuturism in Time and Space.”  When Mark Dery coined the term “Afrofuturism” in 1993 to describe art that explores issues of science, technology, and race from technocultural and science fictional perspectives, he did so primarily in reference to postwar African American art, music, and literature. Over the past decade, however, scholars and artists alike have begun to redefine Afrofuturism, pushing its temporal boundaries back to the 17th-century roots of modern science and industry while expanding its geographic boundaries to include diasporic black and pan-African speculative fictions.

[UPDATE] Place as Archive in 20th and 21st Century Literatures

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 3:33pm
Megan Cannella/PAMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

Pacific and Ancient Modern Language Association (PAMLA) Conference

November 11 - 13, 2016
Westin Pasadena
Pasadena, California

Place as Archive in 20th and 21st Century Literatures

This panel aims to explore the ways in which physical place has become archival within 20th and 21st century literatures. One of the most obvious examples may be the ways in which place is archival in post-9/11 literatures, but this panel welcomes varied and original interpretations of place as archive.

CFP Reminder: Divining (the) Circum-Caribbean South(s) | Sponsored Panel at SAMLA 88 Conference | Jacksonville, FL | Nov 4-6, 2016

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 9:42am
The Society for the study of Southern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 1, 2016

CFP: Divining (the) Circum-Caribbean South(s)
Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Southern Literature
SAMLA 88 | November 4-6, 2016 | Jacksonville, FL

As SAMLA heads to Jacksonville, Florida, for its 2016 conference, one recalls Keith Cartwright’s characterization of the state as a “longtime frontier[] of creolizing contact” (8): “Whether in Old South Jacksonville or St. Augustine, or south of that South in Miami’s creolizing space, Florida repeats itself as an ‘un-American’ frontier of the nation, a multi-ethnic borderland, a point of contested migration and immigration, a location of repeating racialized violence, and a divinatory contact space” (188).

PAMLA 2016: African American Literature (abstract due 6/10/16; conference 11-13 Nov. 2016)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 25, 2016 - 9:45am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 10, 2016

Looking for paper proposals on any topic relating to African American Literature. Papers relating in particular to the conference theme of “Archives, Libraries, Properties” are especially welcome. 

To submit a paper proposal for this session, or one of the many other approved PAMLA sessions, please go to: http://www.pamla.org/2016/topic-areas

Proposals are due by Friday, June 10, 2016. 

The PAMLA conference 2016 will be held over the 11-13 November 2016 weekend at the Westin Pasadena, CA.

BILLIE 101: A Hundred and One Years of Lady Day

updated: 
Monday, May 23, 2016 - 9:08am
Michael Perez / Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, May 22, 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: A BILLIE HOLIDAY ANTHOLOGY

Jessica McKee and Michael Perez, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

SEVENTH BIENNIAL CONFERENCE Toni Morrison and her role as Editor

updated: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 10:45am
Toni Morrison Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 15, 2016

  

TONI MORRISON SOCIETY
SEVENTH BIENNIAL CONFERENCE:
TONI MORRISON AND HER ROLE AS EDITOR
JULY 21-24, 2016, The Roosevelt HotelNew York, New York–CONFERENCE HIGHLIGHTS–

Greetings, Colleagues,

Roots at 40: Reflections and Remembrances [Update]

updated: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 10:46am
Goodwin College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 1, 2016

In the final week of January, 1977, the ABC miniseries Roots became the most-watched television program of all time. To the surprise of the show’s producers, Roots became not only a ratings windfall, but a cultural phenomenon, articulating an African-American counter-narrative of American history, provoking a dialogue about the legacy of slavery, and presenting African-American characters with a dignity and integrity that differed sharply from the caricatured representations common to television up to that time. In many ways, the response to the show by the media and the general public constitutes the first of many “conversations about race” that have punctuated the Post-Civil Rights era.

Southern Studies Conference 10-11 Feb. 2017

updated: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 10:44am
Auburn University at Montgomery
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 15, 2016

Now in its ninth year, the AUM Southern Studies Conference invites panel and paper proposals on any aspect of Southern literature. The conference will be held 10-11 February 2017. Topics may include but are not limited to:

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