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Pedagogies in the Flesh: Teaching, Learning, and the Embodiment of Sociocultural Differences in Education

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 3:53pm
Editors: Sarah Travis, Amelia M. Kraehe, Emily Jean Hood, and Tyson E. Lewis

Current discourses surrounding education rely heavily upon developmental psychology and cognitive theory as the primary tools for depicting and explaining human experience and subjectivity. However, these tools prove to be inadequate, as they fail to account for the historicity and materiality of human development and personhood. Alternate approaches are needed if we are to understand the making of the self as a process through which socially and culturally situated bodies are construed and experienced within and against histories of racism, sexism, heteronormativity, ableism, and class inequality. Certainly the histories of oppression based on social hierarchies are addressed in social foundations literature as well as anti-oppressive pedagogies.

The Legacy of Performance: Oral storytelling and Music in Minority, Postcolonial, and Immigrant Literatures (6/10/15; 11/13/15)

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 2:37pm
MELUS at SAMLA

People in ethnic/racial minority groups, those from colonized countries,
and immigrants often carry with them a rich heritage of oral story telling and musical performance—from the Ananci stories out of Africa to the Klezmer music of Jewish immigrants. This panel invites papers on literary texts that represent, celebrate, rework, or otherwise engage with the conference theme of creativity in all of its manifestations. Topics might include, but are not limited to: the use of trickster figures in literature, reworking/rewriting of oral myths/legends, the use of music in literature, and the use of visual and/or performing arts in literature. Presentations should run between 15 and 20 minutes and allow time for discussion.

Conflicts and Resolutions

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 10:15am
Michigan College English Association

Call for Papers: MCEA Conference on Friday, October 16 and Saturday, October 17, 2015

Theme: Conflicts and Resolutions

Featured Luncheon Speaker: Poet Linda Nemec Foster

Location: Davenport University, Robert W. Sneden Center, 6191 Kraft Avenue, Grand Rapids, Michigan, 49512

2015 Conference on the Black Experience

updated: 
Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 1:01am
Paine College

The theme of the 2015 Conference on the Black Experience (COBE) is: Civil Rights and Student Activism in America: Unfinished Business. The COBE Committee has selected this theme to mark the 50th anniversary of events, such as the 1964 Civil Rights Act, Bloody Sunday, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Such events are still very relevant and should be studied and discussed for insights into not just individuals, but ideas, organizations, and actions that changed the trajectory of America for the good.

[UPDATE] Wreck Park Journal Now Taking Criticism Submissions

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 5:01pm
Wreck Park Journal

Wreck Park: Interesting Literatures, Interested Criticism

Wreck Park is a double-blind, peer reviewed publication run out of Binghamton, New York. The journal publishes prose, poetry, criticism, and interviews, and is particularly interested in conceptual frameworks and developments that set to disrupt the canonical and standardized discourses of the contemporary academic and literary landscapes. The journal welcomes authors, poets, researchers, and thinkers whose work reflects an interrogation of engendered norms and traditions within societies, cultures, intellectual circles, and beyond.

CFP: MMLA Creative Writing II: Prose - Border(ing) Anxiety: Constructions of a Biopolitical Other (due April 5th)

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 3:40pm
Francesco Levato / MMLA

The force of biopolitics in contemporary society marks boundaries beyond geopolitical borders, inscribing otherness on bodies simultaneously necessary to the functioning of society, while abjecting them as dangerous to the very fabric of that society; an anxiety that reimagines and reproduces disciplinary power structures employed in the regulation, control, and subjugation of the collective, as well as individual, body. In this panel we seek to examine the material implications of the construction and bordering of such biopolitical otherness in our contemporary moment as imagined across multiple modes of literary and scholarly production.

MMLA Conference, American Literature I (before 1870) by April 5, 2015

updated: 
Wednesday, March 18, 2015 - 12:56pm
Midwest Modern Language Association Conference

With the theme of "Arts and Sciences" in mind, we welcome papers exploring the relationship between the artistic and the scientific in American literary texts produced before 1870. Possible topics might include: representations of artistic or scientific innovation or discovery, explorations of pseudo-science and its cultural effects, the influence of literary texts on scientific and/or medical knowledge and practice, the influence of scientific and/or medical progress on the literary imagination, doctors and/or patients as characters in literary texts, art and/or artifice as theme, and the role of the arts and/or the sciences within the larger American culture.

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