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Special Session Panel: Religion in American Literature (PAMLA), Portland, OR, 11/6-8, 2015

Friday, March 20, 2015 - 4:21pm
2015 Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Portland, Oregon

This panel seeks to address how questions of faith have shaped cultural meanings in American literary history. In particular, it welcomes papers that examine the relationship between suffering and religious identity. Some of the questions we will consider are: how do literary texts represent the connection between suffering and faith? How did the growth in secularity influence the way American writers conceptualized and responded to suffering? Do religious and non-religious writers come to terms with human suffering in different ways?

Homeliness, Domesticity and Security in American Culture. September 23-25, 2015.

Friday, March 20, 2015 - 10:38am
Polish Association for American Studies

Recent academic interests and explorations within the field of broadly understood American Studies have been largely concentrating on the unusual and exceptional aspects of American literature, art and life, such as wildness, transgression, excess, violence, sublimity, greatness, intemperance, extraordinariness. The questions which the conference is going to address will focus on the constructions and the place of the "ordinary" viewed from the perspective of various "home"-inspired discourses, from housing to domestic policy, through questions of family values, ethics of modesty, simplicity of living, unpretentiousness, individual and domestic security, American communities, localities and neighborhoods.

Revenge Conference

Friday, March 20, 2015 - 4:23am
Dr Ben Parsons/ University of Leicester

Reflections for Revenge Conference at the University of Leicester – only two weeks left to submit your abstract!
Please can I remind you all of the exciting new conference we are holding in September at the University of Leicester. The Call for Papers is open but will close on the 2nd April. For more details about the conference, and the wider collaboration into the study of revenge, please visit our website: or contact us on

Digital Public Feeds or Is Twitter Literature a Thing? CFP Special Session MLA 2016

Friday, March 20, 2015 - 12:44am
Leisha Jones

Is twitter fiction a new/emergent literary form, or is it a derivative shorthand narrative for a generation who won't/can't read long works? Looking for a paper to round out a panel on the role of Twitter in contemporary literature, and in particular an excavation of the publics producing/produced by it. Send a 250 word abstract and brief bio to by March 25, 2015.

[UPDATE] Transnational Narratives of Performed Exile and Englishness

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 8:04pm
Catalina Florina Florescu, Pace University

In the PMLA inaugural edition released in 2014, Professor Simon Gikandi of Princeton University published an editorial titled, "Provincializing English," that (in part) constitutes the foundation for my collection. Dr. Gikandi explains that there is no English but Englishes, a concept that is not novel, and yet not fully embraced by and/or employed in the academic circles. As Dr.

Consuming and Consumption: abstract due October 20, 2015

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 5:30pm
Association of Carolina Emerging Scholars

Consumption sustains and undermines modern life, from popular culture to our most privileged art. The Association of Carolina Emerging Scholars is seeking abstracts that address consumption in any of its many forms, including but not limited to the following: eating, buying, obsession, the reception of media, and the status-seeking public use of resources first called "conspicuous consumption" by Thorstein Veblen in 1899.

CFP: Gothic Tourism

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 4:58pm
Dr Lorna Piatti-Farnell and Prof. Donna Lee Brien

In recent years, it has become clear that 'Gothic' as a critical term has the potential to bring together varied perspectives, from numerous areas of enquiry. While there has been some interest in analysing examples of tourist experiences through a Gothic lens, this has mainly been limited to a small number of locations and disciplinary perspectives (London, Whitby and literary related subjects and approaches, for example). Thus, the topic of 'Gothic tourism' offers a new area that can be addressed from a number of multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches.

Pedagogies in the Flesh: Teaching, Learning, and the Embodiment of Sociocultural Differences in Education

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 3:53pm
Editors: Sarah Travis, Amelia M. Kraehe, Emily Jean Hood, and Tyson E. Lewis

Current discourses surrounding education rely heavily upon developmental psychology and cognitive theory as the primary tools for depicting and explaining human experience and subjectivity. However, these tools prove to be inadequate, as they fail to account for the historicity and materiality of human development and personhood. Alternate approaches are needed if we are to understand the making of the self as a process through which socially and culturally situated bodies are construed and experienced within and against histories of racism, sexism, heteronormativity, ableism, and class inequality. Certainly the histories of oppression based on social hierarchies are addressed in social foundations literature as well as anti-oppressive pedagogies.

The Legacy of Performance: Oral storytelling and Music in Minority, Postcolonial, and Immigrant Literatures (6/10/15; 11/13/15)

Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 2:37pm

People in ethnic/racial minority groups, those from colonized countries,
and immigrants often carry with them a rich heritage of oral story telling and musical performance—from the Ananci stories out of Africa to the Klezmer music of Jewish immigrants. This panel invites papers on literary texts that represent, celebrate, rework, or otherwise engage with the conference theme of creativity in all of its manifestations. Topics might include, but are not limited to: the use of trickster figures in literature, reworking/rewriting of oral myths/legends, the use of music in literature, and the use of visual and/or performing arts in literature. Presentations should run between 15 and 20 minutes and allow time for discussion.