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Black Privacy

updated: 
Friday, June 14, 2019 - 1:27pm
The Black Scholar
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 15, 2020

Black Privacy

Last Call: “Here ‘Comes the Colored Hour’: Envisioning Counter-Futures and Diasporic Visions in the Harlem Renaissance Era and Beyond

updated: 
Monday, August 19, 2019 - 7:19pm
Christopher Allen Varlack, Langston Hughes Society
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 23, 2019

“Here ‘Comes the Colored Hour’: Envisioning Counter-Futures and Diasporic Visions in the Harlem Renaissance Era and Beyond" 

CLA 80 | Theme: Afrofuturism and Diasporic Visions
April 1-4, 2020 at the Hilton Memphis in Memphis, TN 

Call for Chapters: The Wakandan Civitas and its Panthering Futurity

updated: 
Wednesday, June 12, 2019 - 1:39pm
Vernon Press--Academic Peer-Reviewed
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Vernon Press invites chapter proposals on African History. All areas of study, including disciplines such as Black History Race Studies and Women's & Gender History, among others, are invited to submit.

Black Panther envisions 'Afrotopic' advancement; in other words, it imagines an Afrocentric utopia. This call invites examinations of black civilization as portrayed in various literary forms (novels, graphic novels, films etc). Discussions will be centered around representation of Africa and the African diaspora.

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 12:00pm
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

Liminality and Beyond: Conceptions of In-betweenness in American Culture and Literature

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 9:46am
University of Zielona Gora, Poland
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Recent theories explain that any cultural encounter engenders the particular and, more often than not, peculiar condition of in-betweenness. Even in the past, when the immigrants faced the assimilative pressures within the American society, their identity could hardly be discussed in essentializing terms. The condition of in-betweenness affected political, cultural, emotional, familial, professional, and many other spheres of life. A number of social critics and cultural theoreticians have coined variegated terms regarding the condition of in-betweenness experienced by the representatives of certain cultural groups in attempt to redefine their identities in American society.

If Beale Street Could Talk: Memphis (Blues) Diaspora

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:11am
Antonio Jenkins/ Northeast Modern Language Association 2020 Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This is a call for papers for a panel discussion on how places in the American South are used in music, literature, and/or cinema serve as spaces for African American/Black cultural understanding. In particular this panel is looking or papers that describe or explain how Baldwin (1974) and Jenkins (2018) use Beale Street in name to narrate and visualize Black life in 1970s Harlem and beyond.

Please submit an abstract (300 word limit) and bio (100 word limit) to the organiztion portal (hhttps://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/18262)

 

Russian & American Short Stories & Influence, updated; Abstract: 7/8/2019; Completed Draft: 12/1/2019

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 9:54am
Jeff Birkenstein
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 8, 2019

CFP: Russian & American Short Stories & Influence, updated

Abstract: 7/8/2019; Completed Draft: 12/1/2019


UPDATE: Below follows our original CFP, which we now update slightly and with urgency. We have thus far assembled an excellent collection of promised essays, but are now looking specifically for essays that meet the requirements below as well as1) are about Russian authors OTHER than Chekhov (as you can imagine, we quickly got our share of those) and 2) about American authors who are of color and/or women. Please read on and submit your idea(s) to us. We are excited to hear from you.

 

Chinua Achebe's No Longer at Ease at 60 (for Northeast Modern Language Association 5-8 March 2020)

updated: 
Monday, June 24, 2019 - 12:39am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

As Chinua Achebe's second novel, No Longer at Ease, first published in 1960, arrives at its 60th anniversary, scholars have an opportunity to reassess its significance not only for African literature, but also for world literature in general. The story is set in the 1950's and richly depicts the cultural tensions of African societies nearing independence from Great Britain. It forecasts both the optimism and the disappointment that would characterize post-independence Africa. In dramatizing the fortunes of the Okonkwo family in rural Nigeria and Lagos, No Longer at Ease forms a sequel to Achebe's first and most famous novel, Things Fall Apart (1958), but is not as widely read and discussed as its predecessor.

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