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Themed section: Performance, subversion, relation: tracing queer in BDSM - Whatever. A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies, issue 4 (2021)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:34pm
Whatever. A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies / CIRQUE (Centro Interuniversitario di Ricerca Queer - Inter-University Centre for Queer Research)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

Introducing Whatever

Scholars working in queer studies, both in and out of academia, are still often marginalized; one of the aspects of this marginalization is the lack of publishing venues, which discourages potentially original and creative researchers from pursuing their interest in queer studies, and from contributing to the development of the field. This has a negative impact on both the queer studies community, and on scholarly, social, and political discourse in general.

Love Among the Poets: The Victorian Poetics of Intimacy

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:31pm
Pearl Chaozon Bauer / Notre Dame de Namur University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

Love Among the Poets: The Victorian Poetics of Intimacy

Proposed volume of essays, edited by
            Pearl Chaozon Bauer (Notre Dame de Namur University)
            Erik Gray (Columbia University)

The Mandalorian and the Western at Western Literature Association 2020

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:31pm
Erin N. Bistline/University of Tennessee-Knoxville
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 5, 2020

The Mandalorian explicitly interacts with the Western genre, setting up a story of a single gunfighter standing against enemies to protect the innocent.  The theme of the 2020 Western Literature Association conference is graphic wests, which lends itself well to a panel focused on the Disney+ series.  

The conference itself will be held virtually, and the organizers seek a variety of panel types.  Individuals interested in being part of a panel focused on The Mandalorian should submit 100-200 word proposals to ebistlin@utk.edu by July 5.   Responses will be sent by July 10.

Below is the full CFP for the conference. It includes details about the panel types accepted. 

 

New Scholars Program

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:31pm
Bibliographical Society of America
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2020

CFA: Applications due September 8 for BSA's 2021 New Scholars Program; info session June 26

 

The Bibliographical Society of America’s New Scholars Program seeks to promote the work of scholars who are new to the field of bibliography, broadly defined to include any research that deals with the creation, production, publication, distribution, reception, transmission, and subsequent history of all textual artifacts (manuscript, print, digital, from clay and stone to laptops and iPads). 

 

Trauma and Academia, approaches to graduate study CFP

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:30pm
NeMLA/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

 

Trauma-Informed Approaches to Academia- NeMLA 2021 Philadelphia March 13-15 2021 Deadline for submission September 30, 2020

 

 

NeMLA 2021 Roundtable: Literature, Rhetoric, and Technology: Fostering Innovation in Theory and in Practice

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:30pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

NeMLA 2021: Philadelphia, PA. March 11-14, 2021

As we move forward in this new normal, there is an urgent need, at both national and global levels, for critical investigations into the humanistic, scientific, and social scientific impacts of the coronavirus, both societally and in academia. It’s possible, likely even, that your current research and teaching focuses are not directly related to epidemiology. Regardless, your research and/or teaching has undoubtedly been affected by the pandemic. Now is a key moment to lean into the many robust opportunities for teaching developments and enhancements.

Teaching and Pedagogy During Crisis: A Roundtable Discussion for the 35th International Conference on Medievalism (“Impossible Playtimes,” 12-14 November 2020, Old Dominion University)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
The Year's Work in Medievalism
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 1, 2020

The COVID-19 pivot from face to face to remote or digital instruction affected every teacher and student across the world. This roundtable invites participants to reflect and discuss teaching in the current moment, as well as during the unplanned (February-April) 2020 pivot. 

The Writer as Sociopath

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

This panel will consider the cases of writers who have used their platforms to create fictions of self—to misrepresent, self-justify, even blatantly lie about their own lives and realities. The panel is open to considering any act of writing sociopathy, from memoir (e.g., M.E. Thomas’s 2013 Confessions of a Sociopath or Donald Trump’s The Art of the Deal) to fictional works that inhabit the minds of sociopaths (e.g., A Clockwork Orange, Gone Girl) to literary fakers (e.g., James Frey, Danny Santiago, JT LeRoy, Caroline Calloway). Is writing in itself an act of misrepresentation bordering on psychopathy?

Is the Novel of the Future a Video Game? Video Games as Narratives

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In video games such as Life is Strange, the Witcher series, and Telltale’s The Walking Dead, multiple story choices are offered that are the purview not of the protagonist but of the player, who may be forced to choose from a limited set of outcomes but is still in control of the narrative’s pace and flow. Unlike traditional narratives in which the writer is in control of the characters’ choices and their outcomes, video game narratives involve the participant in an interactive shared story with multiple possibilities.

Pulp Fiction, with Real Pulp: Crime Writing as Creative Writing

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In the 1930s and ‘40s, crime fiction was often published on cheap paper made of wood pulp, and this reputation as faintly disreputable has stayed with it, pursuing it into creative writing classes in which “genre-writing” has traditionally been discouraged. This panel invites creative writers as well as literary scholars to consider crime writing—true crime, mystery and detective fiction, suspense fiction, and film or television drama—in the context of creative writing pedagogy. Is crime writing inherently disreputable? Does this genre have a place in the creative writing classroom?

Creative Writing in the Digital Age

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

One immediate side-effect of the current ominous economic climate and general uncertainty of our times has been a downturn in traditional publishing. Even before the COVID-19 crisis, consolidation of publishing houses, the closure of brick-and-mortar bookshops, and the supremacy of Amazon had begun to permanently alter the way creative writing is published. At the same time, creative content on the internet has never been so abundant, with poetry, film, and fiction being shared and streamed in ways that create a flourishing if generally nonremunerative cultural climate. This panel looks at options available to creative writers in the wake of the decline of traditional publishing options.

Creative Writing in the Age of the Pandemic

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While it is too soon to fully assess the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic will stand as a watershed in global human life, creative writers as canaries in the cultural coalmine will be among the first to try to render it comprehensible and are already responding to the seismic shifts. The unexpected changes the pandemic has created have altered all of the processes that sustain human life, the social practices and interactions that are the mainstay of poetry, fiction, and drama, perhaps permanently. Enforced social isolation has caused people from all strata of society to contemplate what it means to be engaged in human culture while at the same time facing the possibility of sudden and random mortality, even mass extinction.

The Grad Student’s Guide to Intersectionality in the University (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While universities have long been a space for cultivating generations of academics, researchers, and intellectuals, they have never been exempt from the dynamics of power that underlie any institution based on interpersonal relations. Recent strides at improving inclusivity—for example: greater diversity among faculty and student populations, or increasing numbers of sociopolitically- and culturally-cognizant programs—belie the reality that universities operate along ideological lines that can (re)produce inequities and social hierarchies.

Creative Writing in the Age of Trump

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In an age of Twitter rants, allegations of fake news, and increasingly bitter partisan divides, what happens to the novel or poem? Does literary material have to engage with the political? And if it doesn’t, must the political be read between its lines? What are the possibilities for creative work in an era that is increasingly in a state of emergency? This panel asks creative writers to consider the question of political and literary engagement in our political age. Writers of all modalities and genres are encouraged to explore these questions in the context of their own work. This panel asks creative writers to consider the question of a political literary engagement in our political age. Writers of all modalities and genres are welcome.

The Modified Body in Media and Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

While the overarching narrative that frames scholarship on body modification seems to reduce it—especially in the case of tattoos—into what Matthew Lodder calls a “chronological tourism,” that is, that every tattoo merely speaks of “internal truths” that chronicle milestones in one’s personal mythmaking (as a response to questions like “What does your tattoo mean? What were you going through when you got it?”), such a view eschews the discursive potential of body modification as a social act in favour of pure radical individualism.

Beyond Yunioshi: Rewriting New Asian Masculinities in Media and Literature (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The convergence of critical masculinity studies with postcolonial theory aims, at its core, to interrogate discourses that created hegemonic and binary categories that in turn became eventual grounds for the historical racialization of gender and sexuality, as well as the gendering and sexualization of race. Taking the image of “palimpsest” as its semantic inspiration, this session seeks to problematize the layerings and shifting stratigraphies of power that obscure, erase, or overwrite the specific historical, cultural, and political experiences that underpin notions of Asian masculinity and male identity as represented in various forms of literature and media.

Queer Utopias: Decolonizing Utopianism in Contemporary Literary Studies (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA 2021)
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

José Esteban Muñoz’s ground-breaking work Cruising Utopia has sought to unite scholarship from the disparate fields of queer and utopian studies by contending that “queerness is primarily about futurity and hope” and “queerness is always on the horizon” (Muñoz 11). Aside from this, it has also powerfully contested the academic pessimism toward utopian political idealism that was becoming a dominant feature in queer theory at this time. Drawing on Muñoz’s work, this panel invites paper abstracts about queer utopias and queer utopian possibility demonstrated in literatures of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Italian Romanticism and the Americas: Reflections on History and Myth (Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:24pm
Ernesto Livorni / University of Wisconsin - Madison
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Several Romantic artists and, in particular, writers focused on historical events that brought the Americas on the forefront of the European imagination. Certainly, many Italian writers looked at what then still was the New World with a prismatic approach, either because they were writing on historical events that occurred in North America (especially the formation of the United States) or because they were looking at the independence wars fought in South America; either because the Americas offered shelter to the exiles, or because they provided new ground for thinking about the relationship between nature and culture.

Call For Submissions - "A Quit Lit Reader"

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:24pm
Graduate School Press of Syracuse University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 17, 2020

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Abstracts due July 15, 2020

 

The Graduate School Press of Syracuse University invites submissions for a contributed volume titled A Quit Lit Reader, to be published by the Graduate School Press and distributed by Syracuse University Press. The editors welcome contributions from graduate students, faculty, and administrators working within academia, while especially seeking reflections of those pursuing careers mostly or wholly outside it.

 

Call for Special Issues

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 2:21pm
PLL: Papers on Language and Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 31, 2021

Special-Issue Proposal Guidelines

Papers on Language and Literature is seeking proposals for special issues on subjects including but not limited to

Digital Humanities

Film

Literary Translation

Print Culture

PLL is a generalist publication that is committed to publishing work on a variety of literatures, languages, and chronological periods. We accept proposals year-round. We are a quarterly and expect to publish a special issue once a year, every year. The specific volume and issue will be determined later, depending on the editors’ schedule.

Writing the Heavens. Celestial Observation in Literature, 800--1800 (May 20-22, 2021, Bamberg, Germany)

updated: 
Monday, June 22, 2020 - 3:54am
Aura Heydenreich, Florian Klaeger, Klaus Mecke, Dirk Vanderbeke, Jörn Wilms - ELINAS (Center for Literature and Natural Science)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

In the Middle Ages and early modernity, celestial observation was frequently a subject for verbal rather than numerical and geometrical recording. Astronomical genres, in the hands of natural philosophers, poets, chroniclers, travellers, geographers, educators and others mediated knowledge of the heavens in textual form. Before the modern academic institutionalization of astronomy, such celestial knowledge extended from the cosmological to the meteorological, with applications and implications that touched upon a wide range of discourses, be they theological, legal, political, medical or agricultural.

Trans Media Pedagogy

updated: 
Sunday, June 21, 2020 - 11:26am
Dr. Dan Vena/ Carleton University, Queen's University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

“Trans Media Pedagogy” 

Journal of Cinema and Media Studies Teaching Dossier section

Edited by Dr. Dan Vena (Carleton University/ Queen’s University) and Dr. Nael Bhanji (Trent University) 

 

Label Me Latina/o CALL FOR SCHOLARLY ESSAYS

updated: 
Friday, June 19, 2020 - 4:32pm
Label Me Latina/o
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

Label Me Latina/o is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. 

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