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The Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:29pm
Alan Golding / University of Louisville
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 9, 2019

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 48th Annual Louisville Conference On Literature & Culture Since 1900

Featuring–Forrest Gander, Kaja Silverman, and Marisha Parham

February 20 - 22, 2020

CFP Special Issue - Celebrity Studies - Keanu Reeves

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Renee Middlemost/ University of Wollongong
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

Call for Papers

Special Edition of Celebrity Studies, edited by Renee Middlemost and Sarah Thomas

**Keanu Reeves**

 

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020 (Roundtable): Unforthcoming Texts, Unsatisfying Encounters

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (See our other listings for additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Anglo-Saxon Speculative Fictions

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (please see our other CFPs for the additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Text as Image in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:59pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (See our other listings for additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

Latinx Literature and Culture

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:59pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 10, 2019

Session Description:

This session welcomes paper proposals on any aspect of Latinx literature and culture, but this year, given the conference theme of "Send In the Clowns," papers that attempt to engage with this theme are particularly welcome.

Additional Session Information:

We are currently in a first come, first served submission portion. While the final deadline for submission is 08/10/2019, once there are enough paper proposals, we will close the session.

Please submit any promising work you may have and reach out with any questions.

Age | Narratives

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:59pm
Age | Narratives: At the Intersection of Age Studies & Children’s and YA Literature Research
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 4, 2019

The Workshop Age | Narratives will take place

October 11 and 12, 2019 in Frankfurt

Department for American Studies & Department for Children’s and Young Adult Literature Research

Goethe-University Frankfurt

Organisation: Linda Hess and Anika Ullmann

 

 

Call for Papers: 

Children’s literature and young adult literature are literary genres that emanate from age as a

category of difference. Discourses of age are central with regard to the production and reception as

well as the marketing and distribution of children’s and young adult literary media. Furthermore,

conflicts of age, attributions of age, and the focus on age-specific problems form typical motifs and

Comparative Culture and Queer Postcolonialisms: In Dialogue with Sara Ahmed

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:56pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019

When did become “feminism” become a word that not only spoke to you, but spoke you, spoke of your existence, spoke you into existence? -Living a Feminist Life (Sara Ahmed, 2017)

When interviewed by Ray Filar about her book, Living a Feminist Life (2017), scholar Sara Ahmed is asked about the word “feminism.”1 She replies the following:

Call for Chapters - Collected Essays on Teaching African American Texts by White Faculty

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Following up the 2019 NeMLA Roundtable “White Allies/Co-conspirators:Teaching African American Literature,” Lexington Books has expressed interest in publishing a collection of essays about white faculty teaching texts by persons of color.

Soundtracks of African American Prose

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

African American works often include references to music that may or may not be recognized by a wide reading audience. For example, the spirituals that Martin Luther King, Jr. chanted in his speeches provide added rhetorical context for his words; yet those who do not know the songs do not have a more nuanced understanding of his oratory. Langston Hughes and James Baldwin both crafted their writing with music in mind. Baldwin acknowledged in the New York Times Book Review that “I…model myself on jazz musicians and try to write the way they sound.”

The Politically-Varied Medievalisms of Separatist/Statehood/Independence Movements at ICMS Kalamazoo 2020

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:29pm
International Society for the Study of Medievalism
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

The right-wing medievalisms of Brexit and other Eurosceptic movements have been well-studied in the past few years. But not all separatist/independence/autonomy/statehood movements use medievalism in the same ways. This session seeks papers that examine the medievalisms of other such movements, including those (Scottish independence, Basque nationalism) that identify with more leftist politics, as well as those that engage with a range of political ideologies. How are appeals to the historical or fictional Middle Ages used by such movements or those who oppose them? Preference will be given to papers that address the complexity of the relationship between medievalism and modern or contemporary politics, and to those proposals received by Sept 1.

ICMS 2020: Medievalist as Auctor

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:28pm
Erin K. Wagner
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Whether we consider the high fantasy of Lewis and Tolkien or the contemporary rise in historical fiction set during the Middle Ages, it must be acknowledged that medievalists (and scholars more generally) have long been linked with creative writing. In an era of academia where the traditional university job is far from assured and where representations of the Middle Ages are co-opted by white nationalists, we must acknowledge the wider benefits and contributions of the humanities, while promoting a diverse picture of the Middle Ages. It is more important than ever that the scholastic community embrace its creative side.

African American & Latinx Literature Case Studies; Teaching While Privileged

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:15pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Privilege comes in many forms whether race, class, gender, or education. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 84% of full time faculty are white, 25% of those professors are women. With these overarching statistics nationally, at many institutions, classes that focus on African American or Latinx literature are taught largely, if not completely, by faculty who are not from that racial or cultural demographic. When white faculty teach these courses, they may need to confront their own privilege and cultural “blind spots.” Proposed case study presentations can address teaching either African American or Latinx texts.

JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 8:23am
Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice, in partnership with the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA), is proud to convene and organise the 2019 LLHAA conference titled JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times, which will be held at Southern Cross University Gold Coast Campus on 2-4 December 2019.

The conference will explore the intersection of legality, temporality and eschatology, the normatively uncertain and yet inherently creative space originated by the conflicting encounter between the orderly desire of law and the entropic tendency of apocalyptic narratives, with both forces cast against the backdrop of the ever-­deferred notion of time itself.

The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

updated: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 12:26pm
Faculté des Langues Etrangeres/Université Abd el Hamid Ibn Badis/Algeria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

International Conference on

“The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

18-19 November, 2019

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

I. Segregation and Colonialism

I.1. James Baldwin on Justice/Injustice in the Algerian Context

I.2. Dr. Martin Luther King and Ahmed Ben Bella: “Linking Two Injustices”

I.3. Ben Bella, W. E. Dubois and Pan-Africanism

II. The Emergence of the Black Arts Movement

8th Annual Conference on Medieval and Early Modern Studies

updated: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 3:32am
Othello's Island 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 31, 2019

8th Annual Conference on Medieval and Early Modern Studies - Othello's Island 2020

6 to 9 April 2020 - Nicosia, Cyprus

Held annually since 2012, Othello's Island is a multi-disciplinary conference that looks at Medieval, Renaissance and early modern history, literature, art and other culture, held in Nicosia, Cyprus. It brings together a wide range of academics and research students, from all over the world, to discuss their work in what we describe as a multi-disciplinary event.

MSA 2020: Southern Modernist Women Writers and the Topographies of the Street

updated: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 11:43am
Carson McCullers Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Carson McCullers Society is soliciting abstracts for a two-part roundtable series on southern modernist women writers and the topographies of the street for the Modernist Studies Association (MSA) conference in Brooklyn, NY, on October 22-25, 2020. This two-part series goes with the MSA conference theme of "the street" and is intended to spark conversation and collaboration among Welty, O'Connor, McCullers, Porter, Petrie, Chopin, and Hurston scholars, among others, about the innovations and interventions of southern modernist women writers in creating street scenes, situations, and characters.

Simon Armitage: Probation Officer to Poet Laureate

updated: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 7:15am
Université de Lille
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Simon Armitage: Probation Officer to Poet Laureate

International conference at the Université de Lille, France. 12 – 13 March 2020.

 

Keynote speaker: Terry Gifford

 

Organisation Committee: Claire Hélie (Senior Lecturer, Lille), Samuel Trainor (Senior Lecturer, Lille), Marc Porée (Professor, Ecole normale supérieure, Paris), Carole Birkan Berz (Senior Lecturer, Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris 3), Juliette Utard (Senior Lecturer, Sorbonne, Paris 4), David Creuze (PhD student, Lille)

 

Call for Papers 

 

Constellations: Connections, Disruptions, and Imaginations in Cinema and Beyond

updated: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 7:14am
Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

First Forum 2019 Graduate Student Conference
Division of Cinema and Media Studies
University of Southern California 
Thursday, October 10, 2019 and Friday, October 11, 2019
 
Constellations:
Connections, Disruptions, and Imaginations in Cinema and Beyond
(A Conference in Three Clusters)

Shaping Men: Identity and Masculinity in Italian Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, July 23, 2019 - 9:52pm
NeMLA - Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

What makes a man a man? How is masculinity shaped by spaces, times, languages, and cultures? How are men expected to behave in public and in private? In addition to addressing these questions, the panel would like to explore the concept of masculinity and how this is constructed by social contexts and human relationships. To this day, numerous men are profoundly impacted by adolescent experiences, peer pressure, and expectations based on “male gender roles.” This session invites contributions about literature, theater, film, and other symbolic productions in Italy as related to the complex topic of masculinity. 

Approaching Extinction, Contesting Extinction

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 4:29pm
Miami University (Ohio) - Environmental Humanities Research Cluster
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

The Environmental Humanities Research Cluster at Miami University (Ohio) invites chapter proposals for presentation at a symposium March 3rd and 4th, 2020, and inclusion in an edited volume.

Hip Hop Ecologies (Workshop and Special Issue)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 2:09pm
University of Konstanz, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Hip Hop Ecologies: A Workshop at the University of Konstanz (June 26-28, 2020)

Hip hop is one of the globally most successful forms of cultural production today. Since its emergence in the African American and Latino neighborhoods of 1970s New York City, it has spread around the world and exerted a considerable impact not only on pop culture, but on societal debates around race, class, public safety, nationality, gender, and a range of other issues. The rapidly expanding field of hip hop studies has examined its artistic development and cultural significance from a variety of angles. What has remained almost entirely absent from scholarly debate is the relationship between hip hop and the environment.

2020 C19: Reforming Women

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:57pm
Emily Banta / Rutgers University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 16, 2019

Please consider submitting an abstract for this proposed panel for the 2020 C19 conference in Coral Gables.

Reforming Women

Women were powerful activists in a range of nineteenth-century reform movements, agitating for abolition, temperance, prison reform, education reform, and women’s suffrage, to name a few. This panel asks how women’s reform work participated in the practices of dissent and consent, exploring the politics and poetics of nineteenth-century women’s activism. The very term “reform” bridges material change and continuity in the act of making: the work of re-forming involves repetition, revision, and return, which present substantial political possibilities as well as distinct limits.  

SCMS 2020 - The Good Place: Morality, Mortality, and TV Pedagogy

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:53pm
David Scott Diffrient / Colorado State University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 13, 2019

Since its debut three years ago, NBC’s high-concept comedy-fantasy series The Good Place (2016- ) has racked up numerous critical accolades and industry awards in recognition of its narrative complexity, thematic depth, and groundbreaking audaciousness as a televisual text unlike any other.

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