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Emerging Voices in Irish Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 2:37pm
University of Connecticut Irish Studies Alliance
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

The University of Connecticut’s Irish Studies Alliance will hold a graduate student conference that aims to bring together new and emerging scholars in the field from colleges and universities throughout the Northeast. We are interested in papers that highlight recent and developing debates in Irish Studies and showcase the ways emerging voices participate in these conversations. Due to this conference’s focus on emerging voices in the field, we will accept undergraduate and graduate student work. We invite papers from a wide array of disciplines and encourage interdisciplinary work as well as scholarship that uses innovative methodologies.

Deadline Extended! Papers on Tim O'Brien

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 12:40pm
Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 29, 2017

Call for Papers

Papers and Presentations on Mark Twain Award Winner Tim O’Brien

Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature Annual Symposium

May 17-19, 2018

Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, East Lansing, Michigan

 

*Deadline: Dec. 15* - American Literature in the World Graduate Conference, Yale University, April 6, 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:18am
Yale University, Department of English
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 15, 2017

The conference hopes to broaden the scope of American literature, opening it to more complex geographies, and to a variety of genres and media. The impetus comes partly from a survey of what is currently in the field: it is impossible to read the work of Toni Morrison and Junot Díaz, Yusef Komunyakaa and Carolyn Forché, Tony Kushner and Lynn Nottage without seeing that, for all these authors, the reference frame is no longer simply the United States, but a larger, looser, more contextually varied set of coordinates, populated by laboring bodies, migrating faiths, generational sagas, memories of war, as well as the accents of unforgotten tongues, the taste and smell of beloved foods and spices.

CORPOREAL ARCHIVES

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:17am
Faculty of Media and Communications, Singidunum University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, March 1, 2018

June 1st  – 2nd  2018
Faculty of Media and Communications, Belgrade, Serbia

Deadline for abstracts submission:  March 1st 2018
Notifications of acceptance:  March 15th 2018
Deadline for full paper submission:  September 15th 2018

“Bodies in the Streets: Somaesthetics of City Life” (Edited Collection)

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:17am
The editors of Brill’s Studies in Somaesthetics series
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 15, 2018

Studies in Somaesthetics: Embodied Perspectives in Philosophy, the Arts

and the Human Sciences

 

Edited by Richard Shusterman, Florida Atlantic University, USA

 

 

The editors of Brill’s Studies in Somaesthetics series invite submissions on the topic “Bodies in the Streets: Somaesthetics of City Life” for a forthcoming edited collection.

 

* Bodies in the Streets: *

 

Door Bolts, Thresholds, and Peep-Holes: Liminality and Domestic Spaces in Early Modern England An Edited Volume

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:16am
Rob Daniel and Iman Sheeha/ University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Domestic spaces lay at the centre of the lives of early modern English men and women.  Yet their liminality has often been under-investigated, if not underestimated, by scholars.  On the one hand, households served as a hubbub of familial and filial activity (housewarmings, births, conventicles, fast/feast days and reading groups), on the other hand as sites of the foreign and fatal (burglaries, squatting, murders, possessions, and devastating fires).  The house was as permeable as it was penetrable.  This despite attempts to ward off or perturb would be intruders: via witches’ marks, locks, bars, fences, guard dogs, community patrols and the ‘watch’.

The Joys of the Erotic: Building Human Connections

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:16am
Progressive Connexions
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 19, 2018

The Joys of the Erotic: Building Human Connections
An Inclusive Interdisciplinary project

29th to 30th June 2018
Palermo, Italy

The erotic. A complex, tangled, and ephemeral web of meeting points, interfaces and intersections at the centre of human experiences. It informs our lives, shapes our perceptions and pulls us toward one another while being itself shaped by shifting tastes and perceptions. Shrouded in mystery, it is tantalising, alluring and dangerous all at once. Eroticism is frequently displayed in film, embedded in music, intimated in art and literature, as well as in the advertising on city streets, travel shows and fashion events. Above all, it builds pathways which bring us closer to each other.

“Black Knowledge, Black Thought”: Reimagining Authors, Artistry, and Archives in the Diaspora

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 10:13am
Howard University Graduate English Student Association(GESA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

“Who Cuts the Border?”
– Hortense Spillers

 

The Howard University Graduate English Student Association invites submissions for our third annual conference, “Black Knowledge, Black Thought: Reimagining Authors, Artistry, and Archives in the Diaspora” to be held at Howard University on March 22-23, 2018.   In the midst of transitions in the academy and our world, we seek paper abstracts with innovative perspectives and methods of analysis. Presentations may examine individual artistic legacies or may undertake comparative readings of Diasporic and other texts. We welcome pieces that focus upon interpretation of any aspect of the cultural production of the Black Diaspora.

 

Call for Papers: Rocking Islam: Music and the Making of New Muslim Identities

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 9:06am
Fatma Sagir / Institute for Cultural Anthropology Freiburg University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, February 10, 2018

Freiburg University  -  Call for Papers

Centre for Popular Cultures and Music

 International Workshop

 ROCKING ISLAM:  Music and the Making of New Muslim Identities

27 - 29 September 2018 in Freiburg/Germany

Deadline                  : 10 February 2018

Event Date              : 27 – 29 September 2018

Location                  : Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg / Freiburg University

Organisation            : Zentrum für Populäre Kultur und Musik / Centre for Popular Cultures and Music Freiburg

Worldcon 76 Academic Track

updated: 
Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 1:00pm
The 76th World Science Fiction Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 5, 2018

Science fiction always plays a part in recreating our world and directing civilization's progress. While much SF takes place in a hypothetical "future," the entire body of speculative literature influences and interacts with our world—suggesting potentialities, solutions, organizational methods, alternative cultures, and paths to follow or avoid. In that spirit, the 76th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon) in San José, California has chosen "Make the Future" for its overarching theme.

The Academic Track Committee welcomes proposals for scholarly presentations, especially those that study content tied to our "Make the Future" convention theme, such as the following examples:

Rendering Rituals: On Memory and Memorializing—Feb. 7-9th

updated: 
Tuesday, December 5, 2017 - 12:13pm
English Graduate Student Association at Louisiana State University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Mardi Gras as an event, a reiteration of experience across time, and a kind of ritual renders the new and the old as occurring simultaneously: our past always directly affects our present. This temporal boundary crossing reiterates and simultaneously invokes the past in every instance. In Gender Trouble, Judith Butler describes ritual as related to the repetition of gender performance across time, which denaturalizes the concept and instantiates gender as socially constructed. What if we apply Butler’s logic of the ritual to other concepts of human experience, such as race, religion, sexuality, and disability? Orienting ourselves within this Butlerian logic, we as scholars might think about how to interpret these ritual practices in memory.

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