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crossroadslisbon2020

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 11:13am
Association for Cultural Studies and University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, November 30, 2019

While the research of our invited keynotes and plenary speakers mostly gravitates around the issues of labour and precarities, decolonizing knowledge and the refugee “crisis” in the Mediterranean, the conference is open to all topics relevant to Cultural Studies. Suggested topics, drawing on the work of our invited keynote, plenary and spotlight speakers, and on more general themes in Cultural Studies research, include:

  • (Anti-)consumption and everyday life

  • Adaptation cultures

  • Borders and mobilities

  • Critical and cultural theory

Edited Collection: Close Reading in the Anthropocene

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 10:02am
Close Reading in the Anthropocene
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

I am looking for one or two more essays to round out a volume on close reading in the anthropocene. Routledge has expressed strong interest in the publishing this volume. 

 

Summary:

CFP: Good Omens: Nice and Accurate Analyses by Intelligent Writers

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:59am
Erin Giannini
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Editors: Erin M. Giannini and Amanda Taylor 

 

Written as a collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, Good Omens(1990) had an active and long-term fanbase before the debut of the Amazon Prime miniseries. Its adaptation, brought to fruition by Gaiman as a promise to Pratchett before Pratchett’s 2015 death, however, has not only brought new fans into the fold, but increased the visibility of the original text.

 

NeMLA 2020 - “Dusk and Dawn: 17th- and 18th-century French Writers” (Panel)

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:16am
Dr. Stéphane Natan, Rider University / 51st Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention / Boston, MA / March 5-8, 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel will focus on uncovering the ideas and philosophies proposed by 17th- and 18th-century French writers to criticize, change, or improve their world. We will discuss their personal ideas, beliefs, and value systems in light of the reality of their time. 17th- and 18th-century authors will include female and male philosophers, moralists, essayists, poets, novelists, and playwrights. The method of analysis is open.

Submit abstracts (300 words maximum) by September 30, 2019, to Session ID # 17934

Abstracts must be submitted through NeMLA's website: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17934

Genre Trouble: Interrogating the Gaze through Film Genre (2020 NeMLA )

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:16am
Northeast Modern Languages Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

51st NeMLA Convention | March 5-8, 2020 | Boston, MA

Feminist film critics have pioneered work on the intimate relationship between gender and genre, thus problematizing and unsettling long-standing dominant narratives, structures of looking, and spectatorial positions. Indeed, much of the work by feminist filmmakers showcases an innovative use of genre conventions that opens up new narrative avenues and destabilizes audiences' expectations. Considering its historical dimension, the notion of film genre becomes an invaluable category and analytical tool to explore questions not only of sexual difference, but also of sexual orientation, race, class, or culture.

NeMLA 2020 - “Delights, Disgusts, and Attachments in Latin American Literature” (Panel)

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:15am
Dr. María Cristina Campos Fuentes, DeSales University / 51st Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention / Boston, MA / March 5-8, 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This panel will explore the concepts and stereotypes that lay behind the vision of love and affections expressed by Latin American authors. Its purpose is to create a dialogue about writers’ depictions of love, affections, and womanhood and how those ideas reflect, renew, or challenge Latin American societies. Comparative or feminist approaches in Spanish/English/Portuguese are suitable, but other approaches would also be considered.

Submit abstracts (300 words maximum) by September 30, 2019, to Session ID # 17935

Abstracts must be submitted through NeMLA’s website: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/17935  

Global Literature in the Wake of the Trump Presidency

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:15am
Richard Schumaker NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This roundtable endeavors to assess the influence of Donald Trump’s presidency on literature in the US and around the world. Three avenues of inquiry will be featured. First, how has the Trump presidency influenced literature in the US since 2016? Second, are there commonalities between writing in the US and writing internationally owing to the Trump presidency? Finally, focusing on non-US writing, are there perspectives or themes in global literature that are not at all present in US writing that have occurred in the wake of Trump’s presidency?

One of the strengths of comparative literature is that by definition it offers a pluralistic perspective on concrete world events.

EXTENDED DEADLINE Edith Wharton's New York

updated: 
Friday, August 9, 2019 - 9:15am
Edith Wharton Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Edith Wharton’s New York:

A Conference Sponsored by the Edith Wharton Society

New Yorker Hotel

June 17th-20th 2020 

EXTENDED DEADLINE: Please submit proposals no later than September 15th, 2019 to whartonnewyork@gmail.com

Anxieties of Empire: New Contexts, Shifting Perspectives

updated: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 11:53pm
Middlebury College
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

Eighth Annual International and Interdisciplinary Conference

Call for Papers

Anxieties of Empire: New Contexts, Shifting Perspectives

March 5-7, 2020

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 12:00pm
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

NeMLA 2020: "Psychoanalysis and Laughter: Unconscious Meanings and Political Subversions"

updated: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 11:29am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his famous study on “Jokes and their Relation to the Unconscious," Freud argues that jokes, and the laughter they elicit, allow a kind of access to the unconscious. They permit, among other things, the fulfillment of repressed desires, the channeling of aggression into an acceptable social form, and polysemic satisfaction. As the structure of a joke operates similarly to the structure of a dream (by condensation and displacement, metaphor and metonymy), it also enables the revelation of contemporary ideology and its ambiguities. Further, for Lacan, with the child’s “jubilant assumption of his [sic] specular image” in the mirror, laughter coincides with the ego's coming-into-being.

Gender & Sexuality Writing Collective: The 26th Annual Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 4:33pm
University of Rochester, Susan B Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women's Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 15, 2019

The 26th Annual Gender & Sexuality Writing Collective

Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies

October 25-26, 2019, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

The Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Rochester will hold a two-day writing collective on October 25-26, 2019. The writing collective will provide a lively platform for graduate students to workshop a paper with fellow graduate students and faculty from multiple institutions.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Reimagining “The Middle Ages”

updated: 
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 9:13am
Medieval Association of the Pacific
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

“The Middle Ages” are created and maintained by those who imagine them today, lending urgency to the project of narrating a global medieval that resists the field’s racist and nationalist myths. Given a need for new imaginaries:

Music & Death: 2nd Interdisciplinary Global Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 9:13am
Progressive Connexions
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 4, 2019

The death of a lover, child, spouse, partner, parent, friend is the loss of someone unique and irreplaceable – a presence in our lives never to be seen, held, heard or felt again. The tragic loss of familiar, iconic, well loved public figures and celebrities, the unexpected deaths of people through murder, violence or terrorism, heart rending loss through illness, disease or natural disasters all remind us of the fragility and vulnerability of our lives. In times like these music is often our companion providing comfort in the incomprehensibility of loss.
 

The Insectile

updated: 
Wednesday, August 7, 2019 - 9:12am
Internationales Kolleg Morphomata, Uni Köln, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 25, 2019

 

The insectile: A Workshop
Internationales Kolleg Morphomata, Universität zu Köln, 31 January 2020

 

 

Keynote Speaker:

Rachel Murray, University of Loughborough

Perspectives in the Anthropocene. Climate – Conflict – Migration

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 12:19pm
ITINERARI. Annuario di Ricerche Filosofiche
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, April 30, 2020

Call for papers: Journal «Itinerari»

 

Perspectives in the Anthropocene.

Climate – Conflict – Migration

 

Editors

David L. Palatinus (University of Ruzomberok)

Stefania Achella (University of Chieti-Pescara)

 

The purpose of this special issue of Itinerari would be to tackle the interrelation of Climate, Conflict and Migration, and the ways their pertaining ecological, political, and ethical complexities are construed and circulated via various cultural practices and ways of symbolization.

 

Socialist Side of World Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 12:19pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

This proposal invites scholars to address the connection between Socialist Realism(s) and world literatures within and beyond the Soviet Union and the Cold War. As I. Anisimov stated in 1959 that, in the period following the October Revolution, the leading talents of world literature came to the side of the Socialist Revolution, since Socialist literatures associated with the new reality were rapidly developing not only in the Socialist world, but also in the capitalist world, where the best part of literature has joined battle to change reality. However, in the past decades the Socialist side of World Literature has not gotten the proper attention in World Literature studies.

Nineteenth-Century Formations

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 12:18pm
University of Hong Kong
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Nineteenth-Century Formations

The University of Hong Kong

December 6-7

 

This interdisciplinary conference asks participants to rethink the nineteenth century and its social, aesthetic, and discursive formations. It brings together scholars from a variety of disciplines to consider the categories that inform and shape our various disciplinary approaches to the nineteenth century. In doing so, it invokes the term “formations” in a broad sense, to convey the processes by which concepts, categories, structures, systems, and institutions—many of which remain in place today—came into existence during this period.

 

Film & Media Festival SIG CFP -- Deadline Extended

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 12:13pm
SCMS Film & Media Festival SIG
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019

//Deadline Extended//

The Film & Media Festival SIG has extended its deadline to assist in coordinating preconstituted panels for next year's SCMS to August 8.

Submission details below!

Film & Media Festivals SIG – Call for Papers, SCMS 2020 in Denver (April, 1st-5th)

To participate in a preconstituted panel sponsored by the Film and Media Festivals SIG, please submit a summary no longer than 2500 characters, 3-5 bibliographic sources, and an author bio no longer than 500 characters.

Please copy and paste your proposal into the body of the email message (avoid sending attachments!) and include in the subject heading “Film Festival SCMS paper (or workshop) submission.”

Call for Papers: American Literature at PCA 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 10:54am
Corey Taylor / Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

The American Literature Area of the Popular Culture Association invites submissions for our National Conference, to be held April 15-18, 2020 at the Downtown Marriott in Philadelphia, PA.

Label Me Latina/o CALL FOR SCHOLARLY ESSAYS

updated: 
Tuesday, August 6, 2019 - 10:26am
Label Me Latina/o
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 15, 2019

Label Me Latina/o is an online, refereed international e-journal that focuses on Latino Literary Production in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The journal invites scholarly essays focusing on these writers for its biannual publication. 

CALL FOR PAPERS Translational Spaces: Language, Literatures, Disciplines

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 12:07pm
Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (OCCT), University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 10, 2019

Call for Papers

Translational Spaces: Language, Literatures, Disciplines

A postgraduate and early career conference at the Oxford Comparative Criticism and Translation (OCCT) Research Centre, University of Oxford (22 February 2020)

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Medieval Representations of Scholarly Labor

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 12:06pm
Program in Medieval Studies at Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

From the Codex Amiatinus’s depiction of Ezra writing in a book to that of Hildegard of Bingen receiving and dictating her supernatural visions in the frontispiece to the Scivias, interest in representing the labors of scholars spanned the length of the Middle Ages. Not only do depictions of scholarly labor such as these, whether visual or textual, shed light onto the material culture and historical practices of medieval scholarship, but they also reveal the ways in which medieval artists and writers sought to convey ideas about the work that they themselves performed and the functions they served in society.

Kalamazoo ICMS 2020: Migration, Exile, Displacement (roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 5, 2019 - 12:06pm
Program in Medieval Studies at Yale
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

Medieval refugees’ stories can be difficult to access, but our own encounters with contemporary refugee crises may hint at the disruption that accompanied mass displacement in the Middle Ages. As millions across the globe continue to be uprooted, what can we learn about the experience of displacement in the medieval world? Persecution, war, plague, poverty, and other factors all contributed to forced migration and exile, as seen in the expulsions of Jews from England and France; the expulsion of Andalusi Muslims during Spain’s Reconquista; displacements caused by the Mongol invasions; and in the migration of peoples escaping the Black Death.

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