all recent posts

Call for chapters on The Fast and the Furious films

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:39pm
Dr Joshua Gulam, Liverpool Hope University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Editors - Dr Joshua Gulam (Liverpool Hope University), Dr Sarah Feinstein (University of Leeds), and Dr Fraser Elliott (University of Salford)

We are seeking chapter proposals for an edited collection on the culture, commerce, and ideology of The Fast and the Furious films.

The Work of the Artist: Sigma Tau Delta Regional Undergraduate Conference

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:38pm
Sigma Tau Delta/Mount St. Mary's University Department of English
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

This undergradaute conference seeks to examine the concept of labor in all of its forms: intellectual, artistic, physical, and otherwise. Our conference theme rises out of Sigma Tau Delta’s proposed common reading of the year, Tess Taylor’s Work and Days. This is, of course, a theme celebrated in literature through the ages.

For instance, in Robert Frost’s poem “The Death of the Hired Man,” Silas, the hired man, works one summer beside Harold Wilson, a boy home from college.  Silas believes if he could teach Harold to build a load of hay, “he’d be / some good perhaps to someone in the world. / He hates to see a boy the fool of books.”  This poem presents a tension between physical labor and intellectual labor. 

The Ludic Outlaw: Medievalism, Games, Sport, and Play (A Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:37pm
International Association for Robin Hood Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

International Congress on Medieval Studies (ICMS), Kalamazoo 2020
     

Cross-platform video games are now so popular as to constitute a financial threat to Netflix and other digital content services. One feature of many of these games is the ludic outlaw figure—found, for example, in the 2016 multiplayer Overwatch—that works to resist oppression within the game world. Because they signify popular definitions of justice and communal welfare, modern digital outlaws frequently evoke medieval outlaw representations, such as Robin Hood. In what specific ways do enduring medieval outlaw tropes function as model responses to oppression in modern games?

Call for Journal Articles—Queerness in the Digital Age

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:37pm
Tom Welch, The Velvet Light Trap (University of Wisconsin—Madison)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 31, 2019

Queer Media and the Digital

Digital technology has altered all aspects of media cultures, including questions of identity that can affect everything from the production of texts, their content, their distribution, their reception, and more. At the same time, popular and academic understandings of queerness have evolved to incorporate expanding ideas of gender, sexuality, race, disability, ethnicity, and other identity categories. Not only has digital technology altered the ways in which queerness can be articulated, but queer media has also shaped the form and reception of digital texts. Understanding queerness in the digital age requires us to account for the changes in both queer studies and digital studies.

The Power and Limits of Narrative in Opposing Injustice (NeMLA 2020)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:35pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Literature, film, and other forums for bearing witness to injustice can create space for voices that have been silenced. They can lead to the recognition of people subjected to human rights violations. As such, narratives of witness have the power to connect people across divisions of nation, culture, and experience. They may contribute to shared national and even transnational identities.

CFP: "Post-Political Critique and Literary Studies" ACLA Seminar (Chicago, 19-22 March 2020) (Deadline: 23 September 2019)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:34pm
Juan Meneses, UNC Charlotte
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

“Post-Political Critique and Literary Studies”

 

Call for Papers for ACLA 2020 Seminar (Chicago, 19-22 March 2020)

 

 

This seminar seeks papers that reflect on the analytical bridges that might exist between post- political theory and literary studies. The main question the seminar aims to answer is the following: Decades after everything was declared to be political, what are the affordances, triumphs, and pitfalls of a post-political theory of literature?

 

[ACLA seminar] New Perspectives on the Indian New Wave: Fifty Years On

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:32pm
Usha Iyer/Stanford University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 23, 2019

Call for Abstracts

ACLA (American Comparative Literature Association) 2020

Conference Dates: March 19th-22nd 2020, Chicago

Abstract submission deadline: Sept 23, 2019 (9 a.m. EST)

 

New Perspectives on the Indian New Wave: Fifty Years On

(https://www.acla.org/new-perspectives-indian-new-wave-fifty-years)

Organizers: Manishita Dass (Royal Holloway, University of London) & Usha Iyer (Stanford University)

 

Leon Edel Prize (11/1/19)

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:32pm
Henry James Review
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 1, 2019

The Leon Edel Prize is awarded annually for the best essay on Henry James by a beginning scholar. The prize carries with it an award of $300, and the prize-winning essay will be published in HJR.

The competition is open to applicants who have not held a full-time academic appointment for more than four years. Independent scholars and graduate students are encouraged to apply.

Essays should be 20-30 pages (including notes), original, and not under submission elsewhere or previously published.

Send submissions to: hjamesr@creighton.edu

Author's name should not appear on the manuscript.

Environmental Violence

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:30pm
Elizabeth S. Leet, Franklin & Marshall College
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Environmental Violence

IMC Kalamazoo (May 7-10, 2020)

Organizer: Elizabeth S. Leet (eleet@fandm.edu)

Much early ecocriticism focused on natural spaces as complements to human agency. For example, studies of the hortus conclusus in medieval romance emblematize this view of nature as a fecund space mastered by humans. In our time of climate crisis, however, ecocritics seek to complicate anthropocentric views of medieval environments. By studying climates and environments that reject human dominion and endanger human lives, we may examine the violence these environments enact and evaluate the models they offer for human survival and care amidst climate disaster.

Fictionality and Belief in Middle English Writing at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:29pm
Kathryn Mogk (Harvard University)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

Coleridge's famous phrase "the willing suspension of disbelief" implies that disbelief (i.e., secularity) is a pre-condition of fictionality. That argument is made explicitly in Catherine Gallagher's well-known article "The Rise of Fictionality"—but it is also often assumed in medieval studies, as fictionality is localized in secular romance and rarely considered in devotional contexts. Where do fictional writing and sincere belief meet, and how do they interact? This panel welcomes papers that investigate the relationship between fictionality and belief from any angle, but which might respond to one or several of the following questions.

The Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:29pm
Alan Golding / University of Louisville
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 9, 2019

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

The 48th Annual Louisville Conference On Literature & Culture Since 1900

Featuring–Forrest Gander, Kaja Silverman, and Marisha Parham

February 20 - 22, 2020

CFP Special Issue - Celebrity Studies - Keanu Reeves

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Renee Middlemost/ University of Wollongong
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

Call for Papers

Special Edition of Celebrity Studies, edited by Renee Middlemost and Sarah Thomas

**Keanu Reeves**

 

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020 (Roundtable): Unforthcoming Texts, Unsatisfying Encounters

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (See our other listings for additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Anglo-Saxon Speculative Fictions

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 2:00pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (please see our other CFPs for the additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

ICMS Kalamazoo 2020: Text as Image in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:59pm
Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 10, 2019

The Yale Department of English Medieval Colloquium & Scriptorium working group are pleased to present two panels and a roundtable that have grown out of our conversations with speakers and faculty over the previous year (See our other listings for additional panels). For panels, we invite papers of 15 to 20 minutes and for the roundtable we invite 5-7 minute remarks on the topic. If you are uncertain as to your proposed paper’s fit for the panels, please contact us. While our colloquium represents the Department of English at Yale, we are interdisciplinary in outlook and composition and welcome papers from all medieval-interested disciplines and that cover topics beyond texts in Anglo-Saxon and Middle English.

Latinx Literature and Culture

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:59pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (PAMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 10, 2019

Session Description:

This session welcomes paper proposals on any aspect of Latinx literature and culture, but this year, given the conference theme of "Send In the Clowns," papers that attempt to engage with this theme are particularly welcome.

Additional Session Information:

We are currently in a first come, first served submission portion. While the final deadline for submission is 08/10/2019, once there are enough paper proposals, we will close the session.

Please submit any promising work you may have and reach out with any questions.

Age | Narratives

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:59pm
Age | Narratives: At the Intersection of Age Studies & Children’s and YA Literature Research
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 4, 2019

The Workshop Age | Narratives will take place

October 11 and 12, 2019 in Frankfurt

Department for American Studies & Department for Children’s and Young Adult Literature Research

Goethe-University Frankfurt

Organisation: Linda Hess and Anika Ullmann

 

 

Call for Papers: 

Children’s literature and young adult literature are literary genres that emanate from age as a

category of difference. Discourses of age are central with regard to the production and reception as

well as the marketing and distribution of children’s and young adult literary media. Furthermore,

conflicts of age, attributions of age, and the focus on age-specific problems form typical motifs and

Comparative Culture and Queer Postcolonialisms: In Dialogue with Sara Ahmed

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:56pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 18, 2019

When did become “feminism” become a word that not only spoke to you, but spoke you, spoke of your existence, spoke you into existence? -Living a Feminist Life (Sara Ahmed, 2017)

When interviewed by Ray Filar about her book, Living a Feminist Life (2017), scholar Sara Ahmed is asked about the word “feminism.”1 She replies the following:

Call for Chapters - Collected Essays on Teaching African American Texts by White Faculty

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Following up the 2019 NeMLA Roundtable “White Allies/Co-conspirators:Teaching African American Literature,” Lexington Books has expressed interest in publishing a collection of essays about white faculty teaching texts by persons of color.

Soundtracks of African American Prose

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

African American works often include references to music that may or may not be recognized by a wide reading audience. For example, the spirituals that Martin Luther King, Jr. chanted in his speeches provide added rhetorical context for his words; yet those who do not know the songs do not have a more nuanced understanding of his oratory. Langston Hughes and James Baldwin both crafted their writing with music in mind. Baldwin acknowledged in the New York Times Book Review that “I…model myself on jazz musicians and try to write the way they sound.”

The Politically-Varied Medievalisms of Separatist/Statehood/Independence Movements at ICMS Kalamazoo 2020

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:29pm
International Society for the Study of Medievalism
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 15, 2019

The right-wing medievalisms of Brexit and other Eurosceptic movements have been well-studied in the past few years. But not all separatist/independence/autonomy/statehood movements use medievalism in the same ways. This session seeks papers that examine the medievalisms of other such movements, including those (Scottish independence, Basque nationalism) that identify with more leftist politics, as well as those that engage with a range of political ideologies. How are appeals to the historical or fictional Middle Ages used by such movements or those who oppose them? Preference will be given to papers that address the complexity of the relationship between medievalism and modern or contemporary politics, and to those proposals received by Sept 1.

ICMS 2020: Medievalist as Auctor

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:28pm
Erin K. Wagner
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Whether we consider the high fantasy of Lewis and Tolkien or the contemporary rise in historical fiction set during the Middle Ages, it must be acknowledged that medievalists (and scholars more generally) have long been linked with creative writing. In an era of academia where the traditional university job is far from assured and where representations of the Middle Ages are co-opted by white nationalists, we must acknowledge the wider benefits and contributions of the humanities, while promoting a diverse picture of the Middle Ages. It is more important than ever that the scholastic community embrace its creative side.

African American & Latinx Literature Case Studies; Teaching While Privileged

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:15pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Privilege comes in many forms whether race, class, gender, or education. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 84% of full time faculty are white, 25% of those professors are women. With these overarching statistics nationally, at many institutions, classes that focus on African American or Latinx literature are taught largely, if not completely, by faculty who are not from that racial or cultural demographic. When white faculty teach these courses, they may need to confront their own privilege and cultural “blind spots.” Proposed case study presentations can address teaching either African American or Latinx texts.

JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 8:23am
Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice, in partnership with the Law, Literature and the Humanities Association of Australasia (LLHAA), is proud to convene and organise the 2019 LLHAA conference titled JurisApocalypse Now! Law in End Times, which will be held at Southern Cross University Gold Coast Campus on 2-4 December 2019.

The conference will explore the intersection of legality, temporality and eschatology, the normatively uncertain and yet inherently creative space originated by the conflicting encounter between the orderly desire of law and the entropic tendency of apocalyptic narratives, with both forces cast against the backdrop of the ever-­deferred notion of time itself.

The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

updated: 
Saturday, July 27, 2019 - 12:26pm
Faculté des Langues Etrangeres/Université Abd el Hamid Ibn Badis/Algeria
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

International Conference on

“The Black Arts Movement in the United States and Algeria

18-19 November, 2019

 

EXTENDED DEADLINE

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to):

I. Segregation and Colonialism

I.1. James Baldwin on Justice/Injustice in the Algerian Context

I.2. Dr. Martin Luther King and Ahmed Ben Bella: “Linking Two Injustices”

I.3. Ben Bella, W. E. Dubois and Pan-Africanism

II. The Emergence of the Black Arts Movement

Pages