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SAMLA 90 Poster Session: A Visual Representation of Scholarly Work

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:34pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

SAMLA 90 Poster Session: A Visual Representation of Scholarly Work

November 2, 2016, 8:00–9:00 pm

Westin Peachtree Plaza

Call for Proposals

 

For its Poster Session, SAMLA welcomes proposals for visual representations of scholarly work. The Poster Session, which features both traditional posters and new media projects, allows presenters the chance to share their research with attendees through graphic design and multimodal composition. We particularly encourage presentations that focus on the special topic of this year’s conference, “Fighters from the Margins: Socio-Political Activists and Their Allies.”

Moving through Memory and Space

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:31pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel seeks to explore representations of transnational space and transcultural memory in literature of French expression. Whether through exile, immigration, travel, migritudeerrance, or the meanderings of the flâneur/flâneuse, francophones have traversed a wide global terrain. Just as authors integrate place into their creations, they in turn leave their stamp on the memories and associations that accrue to any geographical location. Cultural production then reflects and inflects shifting identitarian configurations.

Call for chapters: Rhetorics of veg(etari)anism

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:30pm
Cristina Hanganu-Bresch, University of the Sciences
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Greetings! I am soliciting chapters for an anthology to be published with an academic press and which will cover a wide range of rhetorical perspectives on veganism as identity, practice, ideology, and discursive ecology. Broad topic areas may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Veg(etari)an techne: crafting veg(etari)an arguments about ethics, health, the environment;

  • Rhetorics of anti-veg(etari)an discourses: points of view from science, medicine, nutrition; popular culture – including social media, TV)

  • Representations of veg(etari)ans and veg(etari)anism in the media

Nemla 2019 Seminar "Queer Women: Reading and Writing in 19th & 20th Peninsular Spanish Literature"

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:28pm
Ana Isabel Simón-Alegre / Adelphi University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The topic of this seminar is the presence of the “chicas raras” in Modern Spanish literature, also known as “queer women” in English. Queer is the perfect conceptual framework to think about how Spanish authors explore feminist themes, such as discrimination or inequality using their narratives as a tool to examine tensions in female subjectivity. The concept queer includes the idea of gender dissidence that encompasses how female intellectuals experience sex, sexuality and, gender. Even if oftentimes these writers have difficulties conceptualizing these notions, they are perceptible in women narratives, especially through specific genres: autobiography, memoir, romance fiction and letters.

Call for Abstracts for NEMLA Roundtable: Gothic Television

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

2019 Convention: March 21-24, Washington DC

Roundtable: GOTHIC TELEVISION (Session 17503, Aoise Stratford, Cornell University)

 

NEMLA 2019: Conceptions of History and the Future in American Literature after 9/11

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:27pm
Liliana M. Naydan, Penn State Abington
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

When the 9/11 attacks occurred in New York City; Shanksville, Pennsylvania; and Washington, DC, many Americans had the sense that, to quote Don DeLillo, 9/11 had transformed “the world narrative, unquestionably” (Interview with David Ulin). In destroying the Twin Towers in New York City, they devastated icons of the American Century and they marked the start of what DeLillo has called the Age of Terror and hence the start of an unsettling and unfamiliar future. Yet in many ways, too, the 9/11 attacks, marked a return to historical ways of thinking and being.

New Representations of Motherhood in the Literature of the New Millennium

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:26pm
Laura Lazzari, Catholic University of America - NeMLA Annual Convention
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Please consider submitting an abstract for the roundtable on New Representations of Motherhood in the Literature of the New MillenniumNeMLA Convention, Washington, DC, March 21-24, 2019.

 

Compared to a few decades ago, the birth rate in many Western countries has dramatically decreased and the roles and representations of maternal figures have changed significantly. Through IVF, gamete donation and surrogacy, motherhood is no longer defined univocally, and family structures have evolved accordingly. This panel seeks at investigating how biotechnology, social and family changes, law, and religion inform the representations of motherhood in the literature of the new millennium from an interdisciplinary perspective. 

Post-45 vs. The World: Global Perspectives on the Contemporary (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:26pm
Northeast Modern Language Association Conference 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Much of the work done on the post-45 literary field carries an implicitly Americanist perspective. Even the name of the field suggests a certain literary history, with certain assumptions and blind spots about national spaces, identities, and histories. But what would post-45 look like when considered from outside of the United States? How do the current contours of the field exclude certain voices, either in the United States or elsewhere in the world? And, how would such new perspectives shift the beginning and possible endpoint of that literary period? What new narratives of the contemporary emerge if we begin telling the story in a different year or from a different national or global perspective?

Teaching 20th Century American Science Fiction Writers Including Harlan Ellison, Phillip K. Dick, Ray Bradbury and Isaac Asimov in the 21st Century

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:25pm
Annette M. Magid/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Science Fiction has always functioned as a literary multi-purpose vehicle in which writers are able to explore potentialities of the human condition. Even though sci-fi has been maligned by many as a poorly constructed near-juvenile literary form, scholars have discovered that sci-fi also provides a path from which one can bear witness into past practices and analyze the possibilities for the future.  The focus of this roundtable is to assess the influence of American science fiction writers to discuss the topics and techniques Harlan Ellison, Phillip K.

NeMLA Panel on James Baldwin's Global Legacy

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:24pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

NeMLA; Washington DC; March 21-24, 2019

 

Disillusioned by the racial issues in America, James Baldwin moved to France in 1948. Nine years later, however, he was drawn back after seeing a photograph of Dorothy Counts, a young black girl in Charlotte, North Carolina being harassed by a white mob as she entered an all-white high school. They threw rocks, spat on her, and told her to go back to where she came from. The image and situation were significant for Baldwin for various reasons. First, despite his attempts to avoid American racism, it had found him in Paris. Second, it was as if the taunts of "go back to where you came from" to Dorothy Counts drew Baldwin back "home" to document and confront American racism head on.

Memory Machines and State Work

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:23pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This call is for an accepted session at the 50th Northeast Modern Language Association convention in Washington DC, March 21-24, 2019.  

Chair: Nathan Douglas / Indiana University, Dept. of Spanish & Portuguese

Poetry, Pedagogy, and Public Engagement (NeMLA 2019 Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:22pm
Nate Mickelson
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Public humanities scholar Doris Sommer argues that “learning to think like an artist and an interpreter is basic training for our volatile times.” She encourages teachers to involve students and community members in artistic practices—writing poems, performing skits, sharing music—in order to build critical literacy skills. Like many poets, poet-critics, and poet-teachers, Sommer describes aesthetic engagement as a way to produce critical insights and cultivate political community. According to this view, poetry invites or occasions experiences that alter readers’ perspectives. What we experience as we interpret a poem changes the way we interpret elements of everyday life. And these altered or enhanced perspectives open up new political possibilities.

CFP-Digital Humanities in Foreign Languages & Literatures Courses (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
NeMLA, Washington DC. March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The objective of this roundtable is to discuss best practices to include, organize, and create digital initiatives (ranging from small assignments to large collaborative projects) in the context of foreign languages and literatures courses across the curriculum. What happens when we bring digital initiatives like wikis, blogs, video and image tagging, social networking, mapping, or annotating texts in foreign languages and literatures courses? What happens when we intersect the principles and methods of Digital Humanities with the teaching of foreign languages and literatures?

Critical Fashion & Luxury at NeMLA 2019

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:16pm
nigel lezama, brock university
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Jen Sweeney (Bard College), Nigel Lezama (Brock University) & Jess Clark (Brock University) are co-organizing a small series of critical fashion and luxury studies interventions and events at NeMLA in Washington, DC, from March 21 to 24, 2019. We are seeking 200-word proposals from speakers for the following panel and round table:

Power Dressing: Counter-Hegemonic Practices in Fashion And Luxury

Capitalizing on Fashion and Luxury Studies and Practices: A Roundtable Discussion

For more info, click here: https://networks.h-net.org/node/73374/announcements/2097159/fashion-inte...

International Conference on Ecocriticism and Environmental Studies

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:13pm
London Centre for Interdisciplinary Research
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 20, 2018

Ecocriticism plays a significant role in shaping environmental consciousness. Representations of nature’s agency become central to many studies conducted in literature, culture studies, philosophy, history, sociology or political science. This conference aims to explore the relationship between the physical environment and text in its broader meaning as well as analyse the social concerns raised by environmental crisis.

Conference panels will be related, but not limited, to:

CFP for NeMLA 2019: Viscerality in the 20th Century

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:04pm
NeMLA March 21-24th, 2019 Washington, D.C
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

We are seeking submissions for our accepted panel, entitled "Viscerality in the 20th Century," at the Notheastern Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference to be held on March 21-24th, 2019 in Washington D.C.

Bitter Critique, Emphatic Rebellion: The Politics of Writing While Black (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:03pm
Cynthia Cravens/University of Maryland Eastern Shore
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Conference: Washington, D.C., March 21-24, 2019

Riffing off Du Bois ("Criteria of Negro Art"), Wright ("Blueprint for Negro Writing"), Lorde ("Poetry is not a Luxury"), Baraka ("Black Art"), and many others, this panel seeks to situate, examine, interrogate, and align black writers in American literature and culture. Our objective is to define the many ways black/African American/Negro/Slave writers have characterized or fictionalized what it “means” to be a writer of color.

As Toni Morrison has written, a “black author…is at some level always conscious of representing one’s own race to, or in spite of, a race of reader that understands itself to be ‘universal’ or race free.”

NeMLA 2019: Deconstruction and the Legacy of Edward Said

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:01pm
NeMLa 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Edward Said has been called a great many things: humanist, critic, professor of terror. Practitioner of deconstruction, however, has never numbered among them.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: How Can Adjuncts, Graduate Students, and Tenured Professors Better Fight for the University We Want?

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:00pm
Michael Druffel / CUNY Graduate Center
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel, part of the NeMLA 2019 conference in Washington, DC from March 21-24, 2019, aims to bring together adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors to discuss how we can all work together to fight for a more democratic and just work environment. Topics might include ways to build solidarity to improve working conditions, more democratic ways to share power and responsibility between adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors, and ways to increase diversity in the university. Other topics that address solidarity between all workers in the university are welcome.

Remapping Gender in Shakespeare’s Europe

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:00pm
European Shakespeare Research Association (ESRA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 15, 2018

“Remapping Gender in Shakespeare’s Europe”

 

This is a seminar at the European Shakespeare Research Association (ESRA) conference in Rome from July 9-12, 2019. 

http://esra2019.it/

Taking Shakespeare and his theatrical world as a temporal and locative point of departure, this seminar brings together papers engaging with depictions of gender in different nations of people and across political borders from the 16th century to the present. With numerous studies over the last four decades that address gender in Shakespeare’s works and on stage, we aim to explore how gender is theorised, staged, and depicted across national and cultural boundaries. 

The Irish Republican Army (I.R.A) on Film: Critical Essays and Interviews

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 11:58am
Matthew Edwards
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, January 31, 2019

The Irish Republican Army on Film: Critical Essays and Interviews: Editor: Matthew Edwards

This is a call for papers for a new anthology on the I.R.A and its depiction in film and the on-going conflict in Northern Ireland has been represented in popular film and documentary, with particular emphasis on The Troubles.

NeMLA Roundtable: "Animating Theory: Fashioning Theoretical Concepts from Studio Gainax-Trigger"

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 11:55am
Dorin Smith (Brown University)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 29, 2018

Roundtable Description

This roundtable is looking for 5-10 minute long papers which reflect on the intersection of Theory/post-theory/weak-theory and the animated works of studios Gainax and Trigger. Participants are asked to select a moment (5-15 seconds) of a Gainax-Trigger anime and then to develop a concept which is legible but not beholden to a theoretical approach (e.g. how does FLCL theorize “mastery” to the side of psychoanalytic debates?). By thinking from these animated texts, this roundtable aims to reveal theoretical lines of flight which emerge when theorizing with a text and to show how this approach might animate forms of close reading.

 

Kalamazoo 2019: Early Medieval Education

updated: 
Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 1:43pm
Sophia D'Ignazio, Cornell University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

 

CFP: EARLY MEDIEVAL EDUCATION

ICMS, Kalamazoo 9-12 May 2019

Language and Boundaries in the Brut @ ICMS 2019

updated: 
Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 11:24am
International Layamon's Brut Society
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

This is a session sponsored by the International Layamon's Brut Society for the 54th International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 9-12, 2019, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI.  

‘Rex Quondam Rexque Futurus’: Reading Arthur Today

updated: 
Saturday, August 11, 2018 - 7:53am
The Apollonian. A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 3, 2018

Rex Quondam Rexque Futurus’: Reading Arthur Today

Ana Rita Martins & Diana Marques

School of Arts and Humanities, University of Lisbon | ULICES

 

SCMS 2019- Network Aesthetics

updated: 
Wednesday, August 8, 2018 - 11:06am
Aden Jordan
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, August 15, 2018

Our panel is focused upon networks, and the ways in which cinema and media have responded to the difficulty in representing complete models of contemporary networked existence. Our first speaker will be exploring how networks are represented geographically, specifically examining the second season of True Detective. In the series California is characterized as an infrastructural-economic network. This network poses significant problems for policing networks trying to mediate criminal activity that moves fluidly across borders and behind political obfuscation. In the series, effective policing is part and parcel with efforts to maintain a stable sense of identity complicated by the incongruity between personal and professional networks.

Neo-Victorian Trajectories of Wealth: Negotiations of Class and Material Inheritance

updated: 
Wednesday, August 8, 2018 - 5:05am
Journal of Neo-Victorian Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 7, 2018

Please note the extended deadline, now 7 October 2018.

In the guise of her narrator in A Room of One’s Own (1928), Virginia Woolf wittily ponders the material foundations of the equality of the sexes:

 

"My aunt, Mary Beton, I must tell you, died by a fall from her horse when she was riding out to take the air in Bombay. The news of my legacy reached me one night about the same time that the act was passed that gave votes to women. A solicitor’s letter fell into the post-box and when I opened it I found that she had left me five hundred pounds a year for ever. Of the two – the vote and the money – the money, I own, seemed infinitely the more important" (Woolf 1945: 38-39).

 

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