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NEMLA - Roundtable "Encounter Tradition, Make It New: New Approaches for the Harlem Renaissance" (deadline 9/30/12)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 12:23pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), 44th Annual Convention, March 21-24, 2013, Tufts University - Boston, MA

With the concepts of history, memory, and myth central to the discussion, this panel seeks to convene critical and creative treatments that offer an interdisciplinary approach for teaching the Harlem Renaissance. In particular, the discussion will focus on how various contemporary cultural workers – visual arts, creative writers, musicians, and scholars – shaped a distinct aesthetic during this period. Panelists are encouraged to include non-canonical texts, as well as "forgotten artists" of the period in their presentations. Possible topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

NEMLA 44th Annual Convention - "Early Black Feminist Ideology and the Development of a New Paradigm" (abstract due 9/30/12)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 12:15pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), March 21-24, 2013, Tufts University - Boston, MA

With the concepts of self-reliance, resistance against oppression, and self-definition central to the discussion, this panel seeks to explore the literary and cultural influences of early African American and African diasporic women's texts that serve as the framework for contemporary black feminist ideology. Panelists are encouraged to submit papers that represent the author's struggles against marginalization, objectification, and challenge Western cultural, religious, and social values as a paradigm for womanhood. This panel will examine texts produced by early African American women, both free and enslaved, as part of an emerging Black feminist ideology.

Rise of the Fandoms: When They Began to Rule the 'Verse

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 11:40am
Northeast Modern Language Association

This panel seeks to look at the increased role of the fandom in pop culture today. More and more writers admit to reading message boards, websites, and fan fiction about their work, and making creative choices following this engagement. How have these communities raised the level of discourse regarding their topic of choice, or in some cases possibly have trivialized academic engagement? Other theories relating to this topic are welcome. 200 words abstracts should be sent to Lindsay Bryde at Lindsay.Bryde@gmail.com

Romantic Love in Latin American Popular Culture 01/07/2013

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 11:32am
Journal of Popular Romance Studies

The Journal of Popular Romance Studies is looking for essays, interviews, and pedagogical materials on romantic love in Latin American popular culture, for a special issue guest-edited by David William Foster (Arizona State University), to be published in September, 2013. The deadline for submissions is January 7, 2013.

50 Shades and Beyond: New Approaches to Erotic Romance 2/1/2013

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 11:30am
Journal of Popular Romance Studies

Since the 1970s, both the content and the institutional practices surrounding erotic romance fiction have been transformed. The remarkable popularity of E. L. James's Fifty Shades of Grey trilogy has brought a number those transformations to light, not just in terms of the novels' BDSM-inflected sexual content (old news in the romance world) but also in their publishing history, moving from online Twilight fan-fiction to e-book format to paperback bestsellers.

[UPDATE] Love and Religion in Global Popular Culture 12/1/2012

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 11:28am
Journal of Popular Romance Studies

From reggae to Rumi (the bestselling poet in the United States across the 1990s), Bollywood to South Park, global popular music, fiction, film, poetry, and other media have extolled sacred love in romantic terms and romantic love as a religion. In the process, they have sometimes raised provocative, complex relationships about the relationships between these realms.

Some popular romance texts remain securely inside the boundaries of orthodox belief, bringing theologies of love to accessible, affective life. Others blur the lines between sacred and secular love, or between different national, cultural, and theological traditions, threatening those distinctions and, sometimes, drawing sharp condemnation in the process.

Must Love Dogs—or Dragons: Animals in Popular Romance 10/1/2012

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 11:20am
Journal of Popular Romance Studies

From the animal brides and bridegrooms in folktales to the dragons and werewolves and other shape-shifters in paranormal love stories, popular romance has long relied on animal heroes, heroines, and helpers (i.e., the leopard in Bringing Up Baby) to explore human romance.

How, though, do invocations of the "animal" in popular romance differ from text to text, culture to culture, era to era? What do they suggest about the nature of love, whether the love of humans for one another or the love we feel for pets, companions, and co-workers of other species? How might a focus on the "Beast" in a popular romance novel, film, TV series, or other text help us to understand the beauties—the artistry, the interest—of that text?

[UPDATE] Georgette Heyer Special Issue Deadline Extended 10/1/2013

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 11:16am
Journal of Popular Romance Studies

The Journal of Popular Romance Studies is soliciting papers for a special forum on Heyer as a romance novelist, guest-edited by Phyllis M. Betz. Papers may focus on individual novels or groups of texts, on Heyer's changing status as a middlebrow and popular novelist, on paratextual and contextual issues (covers and marketing, publication history, reception), or on Heyer's legacy. All theoretical approaches are welcome. The deadline for submissions is October 1, 2012; the issue is slated for publication in April, 2013.

Essays / proposals on Heyer's work in other genres, and on her genre-crossing texts, are also solicited for a separate anthology, also edited by Phyllis M. Betz.

Juvenile Literature (edited volume; 6/15/12 for abstracts)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 10:49am
Cynthia J. Miller

Final Days to Submit!

Call for Contributors – Juvenile Literature

Undead in the West II: They Just Keep Coming (collected essays)

Deadline for Abstracts – June 15 2012; Accepted Essays – December 1, 2012.

Philip Roth Society Panel for the JAHLit Symposium, Miami, Florida, November 11-13

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 10:44am
Philip Roth Society

The Philip Roth Society will sponsor a panel at this year's Jewish American & Holocaust Literature Symposium, held in South Beach, Florida on November 11-13, 2012. We welcome proposals for papers on any aspect of Philip Roth's work. Proposals/abstracts for 15-20 minute papers, not exceeding 250 words, should include "JAHLit Proposal" in the subject heading and be emailed to David Gooblar, Philip Roth Society Program Chair, at gooblarPRS@gmail.com. Please include institutional affiliation and full contact details.

The deadline for abstract submissions is August 1.

Women Writing the Second World War - deadline 30 September 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 10:35am
Ravenel Richardson/NEMLA March 21-24 2013

Call for Papers

Women Writing the Second World War

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University

Economies of Abundance: Ethics, Aesthetics, and (New) Monastic Communities - Deadline 2 July 2012

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 10:31am
Midwest Modern Language Association

In contexts of economic scarcity and social upheaval, visionaries often develop communities of contrasting values. Alasdair MacIntyre calls for such communities at the end of After Virtue (1981), and books like Schools for Conversion: 12 Marks of the New Monasticism (2005) highlight their growing presence today. John McClure likewise documents neo-monastic communities as contemporary literary ideals in Partial Faiths: Postsecular Fiction in the Age of Pynchon and Morrison (2007). Yet these contrast communities have a longer history, with examples like Dorothy Day's Catholic Worker movement and William Morris's holistic aesthetic and economic project.

Fighting Words: Aesthetic Protests in Nineteenth-Century Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 10:26am
Northeast Modern Language Association

44th Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
March 21-24, 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Host Institution: Tufts University

This panel invites papers that explore social protest from within the aesthetic conventions of nineteenth-century Anglo-American fiction. How are protests against accepted notions of kinship, class stratification, education, or government indirectly expressed through formal decisions: structure, metaphor, rhetoric, syntax, etc.? Papers that discuss writers operating in or against the genre conventions of romanticism, realism, and naturalism are especially encouraged. Please send abstracts and brief bios to Arielle Zibrak azibrak@bu.edu.

Perspectives on Poe

updated: 
Tuesday, June 5, 2012 - 9:16am
Lehigh University Press and Roman & Littlefield

Perspectives on Poe, a new series at Lehigh University Press (Roman & Littlefield), seeks book-length manuscripts on Poe's work, life, and/or influence from all literary/cultural/theoretical perspectives.

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