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Studying the representation of dialect in literature: how and why? (25th September 2009)

updated: 
Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 10:22am
University of Sheffield

The study of the representation of dialects of English in literature is a well-established field, but one that is approached with a range of different goals and methodologies by scholars depending upon their disciplinary background. For literary scholars, for example, the most significant aspects of dialect in literature will often be the narrative, poetic or artistic functions of the dialect. For dialectologists, the accuracy of the literary dialect and its relationship to real-world dialects tends to be the focus. For historians of linguistics, the attitudes expressed in the text, either overtly or covertly, towards different varieties of English are frequently the most interesting elements.

Playing with Stereotypes. Redefining Hispanic Identity in Post-national Literature and Cinema. [UPDATE] Extended deadline May 15

updated: 
Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 9:47am
Catholic University of Leuven (K.U.Leuven), BELGIUM; Department of Spanish and Latin-American Literature

Keynote speakers

Ruth Amossy (Tel Aviv University)
Jean-Louis Dufays (UCL)
Charles Ramírez-Berg (Texas Austin)
Maarten van Delden (USC, California)
David Oubiña (UBA, Buenos Aires)
Joep Leerssen (Amsterdam University)

General Presentation

Over the past ten years, the concept of the 'stereotype' has become a subject of intense debate in literary studies, especially in Europe. Although in daily usage the term 'stereotype' often has a negative connotation, the theoreticians of stereotyping (Amossy, Dufays, Lippman) emphasize its indispensable and constructive role in processes of social communication, including art.

2nd Global Conference: Heavy Fundametalisms - Music, Metal and Politics (November 2009: Salzburg, Austria)

updated: 
Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 7:21am
Dr Rob Fisher/Inter-Disciplinary.Net

2nd Global Conference
Heavy Fundametalisms: Music, Metal and Politics

Tuesday 10th November - Thursday 12th November 2009
Salzburg, Austria

Call for Papers
What makes metal powerful? Is it the power of amplification, the brutality of the music, the violence of its discourse? Is power essential to the core of metal? Is metal a mechanism for the dissemination of power?

"Pop Goes the Region": Regionalism and Popular Art/Literature 31 July 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 11:14pm
LiNQ: Literature in North Queensland

We are calling for academic papers, submissions of short stories and poems, and visual art that contemplate the intersection of the regional and the popular in regional Australia but also in terms of regional/global intersections more generally.

The small town, the local, and regionalism have long been considered precious territory to be guarded by grassroots music and local art movements, enshrined in high letters, and embalmed in obscurity. This issue of LiNQ (Literature in North Queensland) seeks to challenge and update this notion of the regional. As the Internet connects us in a global village of downloadable ephemera, the local community is redefined. How does the region connect with the popular?

[UPDATE] Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 7:08pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new online journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. The Pennsylvania Literary Journal is created to make a positive contribution to literary criticism and to the arts around the world. There are no geographic boundaries or genre boundaries in the first, summer issue – only the restraints of a website template.

[UPDATE] Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event - CFP - Due 6/15/09

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 11:09am
Shechem Ministries

Shechem Ministries' Matter '09: A Creative Theology Event is now accepting submissions of papers and artwork for the conference September 17-19, 2009, at the Seminary of the Southwest in Austin, Texas.

Selected papers and artwork will be presented at the conference and will be published in the anthology of the conference, Matter, published by Shechem Press.

All abstracts and digital image samples are due by noon CST on June 15, 2009, with completed artwork and papers due by August 31, 2009 at noon CST.

"Also by this Author: E.D.E.N. Southworth beyond The Hidden Hand" (15 Aug 2009)

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 10:28am
Melissa J. Homestead, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Southworth was one of the most popular novelists of the 19th-century, and her career was extraordinarily long -- she actively produced fiction for nearly forty years. However, her works and career have received relatively little attention from late 20th and early 21st century scholars, considerably less than some other 19th-century women novelists, such as Harriet Beecher Stowe, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, and Fanny Fern. Furthermore, the majority of published scholarly work has focused on a single novel, The Hidden Hand. This edited collection will both remedy this deficiency and attract further attention to Southworth and her place in literary history.

[Update] Death in Modern to Contemporary Irish Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 10:08am
Victoria Bryan - SAMLA

NEW DEADLINE: June 20

This call is for the Irish literature panel affiliated with the annual South Atlantic Modern Language Association conference to be held November 6-8, 2009 in Atlanta, Georgia.

This session seeks to explore the ways in which death, dying, or the denial of death show up in modern to contemporary Irish literature. Papers may include studies of the practices of and attitudes toward death and/or memorialization, the link that exists between living and dying, the contradictions and paradoxes that exist in attitudes towards death, the ways in which the finality of death is denied, avoided, or confronted in life, etc.

Albuquerque 2010

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 9:51am
SW/TX Popular Culture Association

Call for Papers
The 31th Annual Meeting of the SW/TX Popular Culture Assoc./ACA
February 10-13, 2010
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Conference Website: www.swtxpca.org

Panels are now being formed for presentations regarding Literature, Ecocriticism and the Environment. Specific areas might include:

CFP: Recreating OZ; Oct 2-4 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 4:38pm
Erica Hateley

Recreating Oz

Annual Convention of the International Wizard of Oz Club

Manhattan, Kansas – October 2-4, 2009

Call for Papers
We invite submissions for presentations of 15 minutes in length on "Recreating Oz." Possible topics include:

* Adapting Oz for stage and screen

* Marketing and commemorating the Oz books

* Assembling the histories of Oz creators

* Teaching Oz

* Archiving Oz

* Re-reading the Oz books and earlier critical interpretations

* Re-imagining the world of Oz for contemporary audiences (Maguire's Wicked, Stauffacher's Harry Sue, the mini-series Tin Man, comics and graphic novels)

Electronic Editions of Early Modern Drama, RSA Conference, Venice, April 8-10, 2010 (Deadline: May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 1:24pm
Brett D. Hirsch, University of Victoria

In his 2007 Shakespeare Survey article, John Jowett commented that "the extent to which scholarly electronic editions will transform Shakespeare study remains to be seen," and that "at the end of the twentieth century" the role of the electronic edition "remained, at most, supplementary to the print edition" (4). This panel seeks to assess Jowett's claim in light of a growing number of projects to produce electronic editions of early modern drama, and to ask whether the electronic edition is still (or indeed, if it ever was) supplementary to the print edition.

cfp The popular in global times (10/11/2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 12:08pm
Journal Culture, Language and Representation / Jose R. Prado (editor)

CLR Journal (Culture, Language and Representation), ISSN: 1697-7750, seeks contributions for its forthcoming volume to be published, May 2010, on the topic of

The Popular in Global Times

Articles are welcomed that engage with the role of popular culture and the politics of everyday life in shaping new and/or alternative life-styles and cultural spaces in the age of globalization.

Possible suggested topics would include, but are by no means reduced to:

Utopian Spaces of British Literature and Culture, 1890-1945

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 5:20am
English Faculty, University of Oxford (UK)

From the fin de siècle to the Second World War, the construction of alternative social and private spaces exerted a peculiar fascination for many British writers. The cataclysmic historical events of the period stimulated Utopian thinking and feeling even as they seemed to make them problematic or impossible. At the same time radical demands for new spaces, whether political, religious or aesthetic, also generated new ways of reading and writing the familiar urban and domestic spaces of everyday life.

CFP: Actants / Residue (GEMCS 2009, 10/22-25, Dallas); deadline May 13, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:46pm
Lizz Angello / University of South Florida

Self-described "student of science" Bruno Latour defines an actor as "any thing that leaves a trace." In keeping with this year's theme of footprints, this panel welcomes papers that consider the traces left by any thing on the world (whether of humans or non-humans). What buried narratives might we excavate by reading residue? What stories are told by echoes? All approaches are welcome, though eco-critical and material readings may be particularly appropriate. Relevant topics might include:

TYCA-West October 9-10, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 11:00am
Ron Christiansen

Conference theme: Point & Counterpoint: Converging fugues within composition and community

See the TYCA-West website for full CFP: http://tycawest.org/

Place: Sale Lake City

*Low rates for adjunct faculty and graduate students
*Keynote and manuscript workshop by Deborah Holdstein, editor CCC

Ron Christiansen (ron.christiansen@slcc.edu)
Program Chair TYCA-West 2009

Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television - First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 10:27am
Kathryn Edney/Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television

"Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television"
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 10-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

AREA: Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television

Reading Ethics in the 21 Century (SAMLA, Nov.6-8, 2009) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:39am
Raina Kostova

SAMLA 2009
Reading Ethics in the 21 Century
Call for Papers
Since Aristotle the understanding of ethics as a branch of philosophy has been defined as a pragmatic rather than a theoretical field: ethics does not simply involve a discussion of virtues, but the practice of "virtual activities." It is concerned, as Sartre later insists, with living "in the world," where one has the individual moral responsibility for the other and for the political structure of society. The personal responsibility to act "ethically" in this case is made possible by the essential freedom of choice of each individual.

Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age (5/9; MSA 11/5-11/8)

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 3:31am
Cynthia Port

Panel: Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age
Conference: MSA 11, Montreal, Canada, Nov 5-8 2009
Deadline: May 9, 2009

The modernist era is often described as a period when an emerging youth culture asserted itself with innovations in literary and aesthetic form. Tension between generations was also, however, a ubiquitous and lucrative theme in popular fiction and journalism. This panel seeks papers on any aspect of this generational divide in middlebrow writing of the period.

Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Sunday, April 26, 2009 - 7:52pm
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

Re-reading Rider Haggard (1st August)

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2009 - 9:45am
John Miller and Robbie McLaughlan/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

[UPDATE] States of Crisis - Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:56pm
Brandeis University - Department of English and American Literature

States of Crisis
Friday, 9 October 2009
Brandeis University
Department of English and American Literature
Seventh Annual Graduate Conference

Since its origin in the ancient Greek krisis, "decision," related to krites, a judge, the term crisis has referred to ideas of discernment, evaluation, criticism, and sifting of evidence. In literary studies, for example, one can see moments of crisis in shifting aesthetics and changing genres as well as in literary tradition(s), character representation, and ideas of narrative. Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches and scholarship, this conference will explore different responses to the idea of crisis in the humanities and social sciences.

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