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Saints and Sinners: Postmodernism, Feminism and Medievalism in Literature in English

updated: 
Saturday, July 6, 2013 - 2:44am
Department of English Literature, Faculty of English, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan, Poland

'I am a stranger in this world' says the nun, the narrator of a story of a forbidden book by Marguerite Porete. The year is 1340, thirty years after Marguerite was burned at the stake for writing and disseminating her heretical work, The Mirror of Simple Souls. The place is England, a Cistercian nunnery where she tells her story the night before her death, knowing that the book irretrievably changed but also shortened her life. But the idea of being a stranger in the world is not an uncommon one for many other Michele Roberts' characters. From the early feminists to postmodern protagonists her novels rewrite medieval saints and sinners, Victorian mediums and contemporary visionaries, offering us new perspectives on well known stories and motifs.

Eugene O'Neill: Hunted, Haunted, Home. The 9th International Conference on Eugene O'Neill

updated: 
Friday, July 5, 2013 - 7:23pm
The Eugene O'Neill Society

Eugene O'Neill: Hunted, Haunted, Home
The 9th International Conference on Eugene O'Neill
New London, Connecticut
June 18-21, 2014
Sponsored by
The Eugene O'Neill Society

The summers of Eugene O'Neill's formative years were spent in the family's vacation home in New London, Connecticut—what is known today as the Monte Cristo Cottage. This conference will explore the significance of this National Historic Landmark and other venues that inspired the plays of O'Neill, America's only Nobel-Prize-winning playwright.

[UPDATE] Green Humanities--Inaugural Call for Papers & Poems

updated: 
Friday, July 5, 2013 - 5:25pm
Green Humanities: A Journal of Ecological Thought in Literature, Philosophy & the Arts

Eco-Gencies: Eco-Critical Responses to Contemporary Environmental Crises

Call for Papers:
Putting the Humanities on the Frontlines of Ecological Discourse…

Journal of Feminist Scholarship (CFP)

updated: 
Friday, July 5, 2013 - 11:07am
Journal of Feminist Scholarship

Call for submissions for the Journal of Feminist Scholarship

The Journal of Feminist Scholarship is a twice-yearly, peer-reviewed, open-access journal published online and aimed at promoting feminist scholarship across the disciplines, as well as expanding the reach and definitions of feminist research. The journal can be found at http://www.jfsonline.org/.

The editors of JFS invite submissions on a rolling basis (for more information, please see the "Submissions" page on our website). The average time from submission to publication for accepted manuscripts has been less than a year, and our current acceptance rate stands at thirty five percent.

Identity and Conflict in the Middle East and its Diasporic Cultures (March 20-22, 2014)

updated: 
Friday, July 5, 2013 - 1:13am
Facult of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Balamand

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Balamand invites you to participate in its international conference, "Identity and Conflict in the Middle East and its Diasporic Cultures." The conference will be held on the campus of the University of Balamand in the Al-Kurah district of North Lebanon.

Digital Death: Mortality and Beyond in the Online Age edited collection (10/1; 12/1)

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 8:03pm
Chris Moreman & A. David Lewis, eds.

We invite proposals for a collection of essays on the subject of Digital Death: Mortality and Beyond in the Online Age. This proposed book, co-edited by Christopher M. Moreman and A. David Lewis, will consist of 12-15 chapters representing a diversity of perspectives and approaches to the subject. We are seeking submissions for new writing from scholars across a spectrum of fields, including religious studies, theology, media studies, digital humanities, and any other area that explores the topic of death and dying in a digital environment, with reference to religion and/or the study of religion.

[UPDATE] Deadline Extension: The Phenomenology of Reading: Experiencing Literature Today, Oct. 11-12, Philadelphia

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 7:23pm
The Phenomenology of Reading: Experiencing Literature Today

The Phenomenology of Reading: Experiencing Literature Today
October 11th-12th, 2013
Temple University: Philadelphia, PA
Keynote: Charles Altieri (Berkeley)

Abstract Deadline Extension: July 21st, 2013
[Update: Scholars from varying stages in their academic careers are encouraged to apply. We've already received excellent submissions from graduate students as well as full-time professors and having representation from speakers at all levels can facilitate the kind of dialogue that makes a conference a productive experience.]

Neo-Victorian Villains: Call for Abstracts for Edited Volume

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 5:46pm
Dr Benjamin Poore, University of York

The Victorian villain of melodramatic stereotype cuts an instantly recognisable figure: cue the top hat and opera cape, the whiskers and moustache, the tremolo fiddle. Yet the narrowing down and simplifying of the Victorian villain is to a large extent a post-Victorian convention, strongly tied to the twentieth century's cultural assumptions of the Victorians as history's 'bad guys' (as Matthew Sweet, Christine L. Krueger and Rohan McWilliam and Kelly Boyd, among others, have noted).

Call for papers Special Issue on Ibero-American Economic History

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 5:29pm
Journal Cuadernos de Economía Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede bogotá

Economic history has achieved increasing importance in economics. In the case of Ibero-American countries, historical evidence has shed light and posed new questions on key economic problems for the development process, such as living conditions, industrialization, insertion in the world economy, trade circuits, , institutional evolution, price formation, income distribution and industrial relations, among others.

Woman and Outlawry (2), ICMS, Kalamazoo, May 8-11, 2014

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 2:47pm
Alexander L. Kaufman, Valerie B. Johnson / International Association for Robin Hood Studies

We invite abstracts (300-500 words) for 15-20 minute paper presentations for the following two sessions, sponsored by the International Association for Robin Hood Studies (IARHS), at the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 8-11, 2014 . Please send abstracts (300-500 words) and completed Participant Information Forms (link below) by September 15, 2013, to Alexander L. Kaufman (akaufman@aum.edu) and Valerie B. (valeriebjohnson@gmail.com).

Women and Outlawry: I. Historical Female Outlaws in the Middle Ages

Migration

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 1:52pm
Observatorio das Migracoes - Cape Verde

The Migration Observatory project, under the Cape Verdean Ministry of Communities, was funded by the ECOWAS / Spain on Migration and Development, it aims to create a dynamic and integrated platform for the collection, processing, production and dissemination of data - statistical and qualitative - encompassing all institutions linked to the theme of migration, providing data for policy makers, civil society organizations and the academic community.

REPOST: Misanthropy and Transhumanism in Utopian Fiction

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 11:55am
Patrick Smyth

Man is a rope stretched … over an abyss. What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not a goal.

-Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

If human beings were shown what they're really like, they'd either kill one another as vermin, or hang themselves.

-Aldous Huxley, Eyeless in Gaza

[UPDATE] Wrath of God: Cinema of Klaus Kinski

updated: 
Thursday, July 4, 2013 - 11:45am
University West of England

This is an update to my previous CFP. I am still looking for papers on the cinema of Klaus Kinski.

The collection looks to bring together a series of essays (interviews with filmmakers, will be welcome) on one of cinema's truly volatile sons. Particular emphasis on Kinski's more exploitive roles and obscure gems. The collection looks to examine his cinema in relation to his off-screen persona and asks whether we can truly call Kinski a true 'genius'.

I'm looking for critical and scholarly essays, written in an accessible and not overly dry manner, that discuss individual Kinski films.

So far, I have articles on:

Paganini
Fitzcarraldo
Nosferatu
Venus in Furs
Timestalkers/Creature

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