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[Update] Death in Modern to Contemporary Irish Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 10:08am
Victoria Bryan - SAMLA

NEW DEADLINE: June 20

This call is for the Irish literature panel affiliated with the annual South Atlantic Modern Language Association conference to be held November 6-8, 2009 in Atlanta, Georgia.

This session seeks to explore the ways in which death, dying, or the denial of death show up in modern to contemporary Irish literature. Papers may include studies of the practices of and attitudes toward death and/or memorialization, the link that exists between living and dying, the contradictions and paradoxes that exist in attitudes towards death, the ways in which the finality of death is denied, avoided, or confronted in life, etc.

Albuquerque 2010

updated: 
Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 9:51am
SW/TX Popular Culture Association

Call for Papers
The 31th Annual Meeting of the SW/TX Popular Culture Assoc./ACA
February 10-13, 2010
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Conference Website: www.swtxpca.org

Panels are now being formed for presentations regarding Literature, Ecocriticism and the Environment. Specific areas might include:

CFP: Recreating OZ; Oct 2-4 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 4:38pm
Erica Hateley

Recreating Oz

Annual Convention of the International Wizard of Oz Club

Manhattan, Kansas – October 2-4, 2009

Call for Papers
We invite submissions for presentations of 15 minutes in length on "Recreating Oz." Possible topics include:

* Adapting Oz for stage and screen

* Marketing and commemorating the Oz books

* Assembling the histories of Oz creators

* Teaching Oz

* Archiving Oz

* Re-reading the Oz books and earlier critical interpretations

* Re-imagining the world of Oz for contemporary audiences (Maguire's Wicked, Stauffacher's Harry Sue, the mini-series Tin Man, comics and graphic novels)

Electronic Editions of Early Modern Drama, RSA Conference, Venice, April 8-10, 2010 (Deadline: May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 1:24pm
Brett D. Hirsch, University of Victoria

In his 2007 Shakespeare Survey article, John Jowett commented that "the extent to which scholarly electronic editions will transform Shakespeare study remains to be seen," and that "at the end of the twentieth century" the role of the electronic edition "remained, at most, supplementary to the print edition" (4). This panel seeks to assess Jowett's claim in light of a growing number of projects to produce electronic editions of early modern drama, and to ask whether the electronic edition is still (or indeed, if it ever was) supplementary to the print edition.

cfp The popular in global times (10/11/2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 12:08pm
Journal Culture, Language and Representation / Jose R. Prado (editor)

CLR Journal (Culture, Language and Representation), ISSN: 1697-7750, seeks contributions for its forthcoming volume to be published, May 2010, on the topic of

The Popular in Global Times

Articles are welcomed that engage with the role of popular culture and the politics of everyday life in shaping new and/or alternative life-styles and cultural spaces in the age of globalization.

Possible suggested topics would include, but are by no means reduced to:

Utopian Spaces of British Literature and Culture, 1890-1945

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 5:20am
English Faculty, University of Oxford (UK)

From the fin de siècle to the Second World War, the construction of alternative social and private spaces exerted a peculiar fascination for many British writers. The cataclysmic historical events of the period stimulated Utopian thinking and feeling even as they seemed to make them problematic or impossible. At the same time radical demands for new spaces, whether political, religious or aesthetic, also generated new ways of reading and writing the familiar urban and domestic spaces of everyday life.

CFP: Actants / Residue (GEMCS 2009, 10/22-25, Dallas); deadline May 13, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:46pm
Lizz Angello / University of South Florida

Self-described "student of science" Bruno Latour defines an actor as "any thing that leaves a trace." In keeping with this year's theme of footprints, this panel welcomes papers that consider the traces left by any thing on the world (whether of humans or non-humans). What buried narratives might we excavate by reading residue? What stories are told by echoes? All approaches are welcome, though eco-critical and material readings may be particularly appropriate. Relevant topics might include:

TYCA-West October 9-10, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 11:00am
Ron Christiansen

Conference theme: Point & Counterpoint: Converging fugues within composition and community

See the TYCA-West website for full CFP: http://tycawest.org/

Place: Sale Lake City

*Low rates for adjunct faculty and graduate students
*Keynote and manuscript workshop by Deborah Holdstein, editor CCC

Ron Christiansen (ron.christiansen@slcc.edu)
Program Chair TYCA-West 2009

Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television - First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 10:27am
Kathryn Edney/Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television

"Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television"
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 10-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

AREA: Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television

Reading Ethics in the 21 Century (SAMLA, Nov.6-8, 2009) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:39am
Raina Kostova

SAMLA 2009
Reading Ethics in the 21 Century
Call for Papers
Since Aristotle the understanding of ethics as a branch of philosophy has been defined as a pragmatic rather than a theoretical field: ethics does not simply involve a discussion of virtues, but the practice of "virtual activities." It is concerned, as Sartre later insists, with living "in the world," where one has the individual moral responsibility for the other and for the political structure of society. The personal responsibility to act "ethically" in this case is made possible by the essential freedom of choice of each individual.

Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age (5/9; MSA 11/5-11/8)

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 3:31am
Cynthia Port

Panel: Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age
Conference: MSA 11, Montreal, Canada, Nov 5-8 2009
Deadline: May 9, 2009

The modernist era is often described as a period when an emerging youth culture asserted itself with innovations in literary and aesthetic form. Tension between generations was also, however, a ubiquitous and lucrative theme in popular fiction and journalism. This panel seeks papers on any aspect of this generational divide in middlebrow writing of the period.

Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Sunday, April 26, 2009 - 7:52pm
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

Re-reading Rider Haggard (1st August)

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2009 - 9:45am
John Miller and Robbie McLaughlan/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

[UPDATE] States of Crisis - Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:56pm
Brandeis University - Department of English and American Literature

States of Crisis
Friday, 9 October 2009
Brandeis University
Department of English and American Literature
Seventh Annual Graduate Conference

Since its origin in the ancient Greek krisis, "decision," related to krites, a judge, the term crisis has referred to ideas of discernment, evaluation, criticism, and sifting of evidence. In literary studies, for example, one can see moments of crisis in shifting aesthetics and changing genres as well as in literary tradition(s), character representation, and ideas of narrative. Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches and scholarship, this conference will explore different responses to the idea of crisis in the humanities and social sciences.

12th Annual Writing by Degrees Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 4:20pm
Writing by Degrees / Binghamton University
    Writing By Degrees

is seeking creative and academic submissions demonstrating or contemplating the craft of writing.

Conference Dates: September 24¬–26, 2009.
Submission Deadline: August 1, 2009.

Guidelines: All applicants must be currently enrolled as graduate students in order to be eligible. Submissions may fall into one of the categories below:

    Creative Submissions


Creative prose, fiction, or creative non-fiction should be of a length to be read within a 20-minute period (roughly 10–12 pages). Please submit the entire piece to be read.

Poetry submissions should be 10 pages.

The Beautiful and the Good: Exploring the Beauty Controversy in Contemporary Fiction

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 3:32pm
Margaret E. Mitchell

SAMLA 2009: Writers, philosophers and artists have long pondered the relationship between the beautiful and the good. Elaine Scarry's seductive _On Beauty and Being Just_ leaps calmly into the fray, arguing that beauty "actually assists us in the work of addressing justice," thereby establishing a tenuous relationship between beauty and human rights. But the opposing argument--that beauty essentially derails justice, either by distracting or lulling the senses or, more insidiously, by aestheticizing what is dangerous and unjust—-still thrives. This panel welcomes proposals for twenty minute papers on contemporary fictional explorations (whether overt, as in Zadie Smith's _On Beauty_, or implicit) of this controversy.

Eudora Welty: A Centenary, Venice, Italy 17-18 November 2009

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 3:30pm
Rosella Mamoli Zorzi, Ca’ Foscari University, Venice, Italy

"EUDORA WELTY: A CENTENARY"
International Conference, Ca' Foscari University, Venice, Italy, 17-18 November 2009. Proposals due MAY 15.

The Conference will open on 17th November, 10 a.m., with a keynote lecture by Dr. Pearl McHaney, Georgia State University.
It will continue with three workshops:
Workshop 1
"The Translations of Eudora Welty in Europe" November 17th, 2-5 p.m.
Workshop 2
"Eudora Welty & Italy" November 18th, 10 a.m.-12 noon
Workshop 3
"The Language of Eudora Welty" November 18th, 2-4 p.m.

Questioning Identity--Representations of Class

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 3:24pm
English Graduate Organization (EGO) @ Western Illinois University

The English Graduate Organization (EGO) at Western Illinois University in Macomb is currently accepting CFPs for their 6th annual conference, Questioning Identity—Representations of Class. Possible paper topics might include but are not limited to the following:
Class Conflict
Marxism
Representations of Labor
Consumption
Capitalism
Globalization
Commodities
Working Class
Economics
Gender
Nationalism
We welcome your ideas! Please send a 250-300 word abstract to: SJ-Naslund@wiu.edu

Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Summer 2009 Issue: "Experiments" – Deadline – July 6, 2009

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 1:55pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal – English Literature Department, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

This is a critical and creative new journal. It is created to find, edit and publish superior works of fiction, non-fiction, art, multi-media and the like. It will be primarily an online journal. Until an independent website is developed the journal will be housed at www.myspace.com/pennsylvaniajournal.

[UPDATE] The Spatial Significance of Native American Stories and Ideology

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 11:42am
Catherine Rainwater, Cristine Soliz, Anna Lee Walters

We are now accepting submissions for a collection of stories, essays, and poems for a proposed book on comparative American spatial concepts, partially titled "Stories the Land Holds." The editors are looking for texts variously addressing "stories in the land." What are the stories the land tells? Vine Deloria has warned us of problems that result from a perspective that is not fundamentally spatial, and such has been the case for current problems that range from ecological disaster to fanatical environmentalism and bundled mortgages. We believe that these complex and problematic American events can be understood more fully from a Native American perspective.

Knowledge and Learning in the Middle Ages: A Conference Celebrating the 800th Anniversary of the University of Cambridge

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 11:28am
Magdalene Society of Medievalists

Knowledge and Learning in the Middle Ages

The Magdalene Society of Medievalists is delighted to announce that registration has now opened for the Society's 2009 Conference entitled: Knowledge and Learning in the Middle Ages: A Conference Celebrating the 800th Anniversary of the University of Cambridge.

[UPDATE] Women in Popular Music: Permanent Vacation

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:41am
Women's Caucus for the Modern Languages/Midwest, Midwest Modern Languages Association

"Women in Popular Music: 'Permanent Vacation': Moves and Departures in Women's Popular Music." A change in location, focus, allegiance or perspective can lead to a major shift in an artist's work, which can then lead to a different sound, a different public persona, a different audience. Women artists who start out as one thing end up something else—gospel singers go secular and vice versa, country goes disco, folk rock goes jazz. We invite papers that explore this sort of transition and explore its aesthetic (and other) consequences in the career of a woman artist or group. Patricia S. Rudden, New York City Coll. of Technology, patriciarudden@gmail.com.

Conference: St. Louis, Nov. 12-15

CFP: Reassessing Theatrical Paradigms and Imagining Global Rights (ASTR, Puerto Rico, Nov 11-15, 2009; Abstr. due May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 9:52am
American Society for Theatre Research (ASTR)

WORKING SESSION: Reassessing Theatrical Paradigms and Imagining Global Rights (San Juan, Puerto Rico, Nov. 11-15, 2009)

Deadline for Abstracts: Friday, May 15, 2009

Conveners: Brenda Werth, American University; Paola Hernández,
University of Wisconsin-Madison; Kerry Bystrom, University of
Connecticut; Florian Becker, Bard College
(werth@american.edu; pshernandez@wisc.edu; kerry.bystrom@uconn.edu;
fnbecker@bard.edu)

[UPDATE] "Catastrophe and the Cure": The Politics of Post-9/11 Music (Deadline May 1, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 9:14am
Anthology Theorizing Post-9/11 Music

In current debates about the War in Iraq, it has become commonplace for politicians and journalists to conjure the specter of the Vietnam War as a means of quantifying the impact of the current war in American culture and throughout the world. Surprisingly, though, few have scrutinized these comparisons to examine the differences between the popular music of the Vietnam era and the music of the current post-9/11 era. While the Vietnam era found countless bands and musicians responding in protest to that war, there has arguably been a significantly smaller amount of contemporary musicians who have taken overt stances, in their music, about the politics of post-9/11 life, in America and elsewhere.

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