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Science Fiction and the "Worldly",, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:23pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

In "Reflections on Exile", Edward Said writes that theoretical interventions need to engage with the "worldly situation", the messy, unstable mosaic through which the long history of colonialism affects a diverse set of political affiliations, global disparities, international divisions of labor, regional rivalries, national identities, cosmopolitan ideologies, green, queer, and leftist movements. Science fiction, likewise, has seen a recent surge in interest and scrutiny devoted to postcolonial and global problematics including works by Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr. (2003), John Reider (2008), and Patricia Kerslake (2011).

Modern Horror, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:20pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, Univeristy of California Riverside

The horror genre is structured around encounters with the unknown. Yet the meaning of these encounters (narratively, as well as in terms of race, class, gender, and sexuality) remains in flux, even within overarching myths such as that of the vampire. One example is the Swedish novel Let the Right One In, which centers around a boy's encounter with a MTF transgender vampire. This text simultaneously employs the threat of Cold War ideologies, with the possible invasion into Sweden by Soviet missiles triangulated around the drama of "encountering," and befriending, the vampire. This panel invites papers that analyze such complex modern encounters within horror, and how the genre stages encounters with social, political, and economic concerns.

Our Text, Your Text, This Text, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:17pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

This panel invites papers that explore textual encounter and interaction within religion. For many religious traditions, their religious texts become paramount—questions of texts' creation, authenticity, authority, vision, revision, and reception, to name just a few, comprise a significant part of the field. So too are questions of interpretation of texts and their messages over centuries or millennia, or when transported into a diasporic context. Who owns a text? Who has the right to interpret, create, or modify texts? What changes over time? What should? What authority does the text itself have? All of these questions and more vary widely by time, place, and religious tradition.

DingDong Hostess is Dead, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:15pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

On November 16, 2012, Hostess announced that, rather than cave to striking bakers' demands, they were closing their doors for good. Within hours of this official announcement reaching the digital environment, the information went viral, and people flocked to grocery stores to stock up on these iconic, American, cream-filled snacks. This panel invites papers that explore the cultural implications of this event within the context of encounters. Papers submitted to this panel may address the following questions: how does the Hostess corporation structure encounters of American culture and Americana? How does its long history of labor struggles contribute to or critique our understanding of laboring classes, peoples, and organizations in America?

Virtual Encounters-Video Games, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:12pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

Video games are a space in which encounters are enacted on many different levels. There are encounters within the game's narrative space; encounters at the interface of player and narrative; and encounters within the external gaming space (think two-player games). These encounters can also be broken down into player-computer and player-player encounters. This panel invites papers that explore these different spaces of encounter in video games. How do these spaces disrupt normative discourses on sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, and social class? How do these encounters disrupt or challenge the player's identity? What are some implications of network-mediated encounters in massively multiplayer online games?

Language/Translation panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:09pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

This panel seeks papers that discuss different methods and effects of encountering language in its varying forms. These "varying forms" can be understood as different languages, in a translation studies context; as aural/oral language or visual/written language in an aesthetic, literary, or art historical context; or as a series of codes or coded information, as in a linguistic anthropology or computer studies context. Papers in this panel may consider questions such as: In what ways does the language itself inform our encounter of a text? What kinds of structures do we encounter as languages? How does the identification of a structure as "language" affect the encounter?

Transnational American Lit, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:05pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California, Riverside

Immigration and migration call into question the boundaries of American literature. As writers from all over the world reside in the United States and as writers from the United States often take on global themes, U.S. literature seems to be moving away from a national practice towards a global one. This panel invites papers that concern themselves with transnational American literature. Paper submitted to this panel may address the following questions: What differing or related perspectives on globalization emerge in American literature and postcolonial literature? How does the global flow of capital influence textual production, circulation and reception of texts?

Romantic Circulations, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:02pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of Californa, Riverside

This panel invites submissions dealing with any aspect of circulation, distribution and discovery in the Romantic period. With the conference theme of 'encounters' and the the proliferation of global/local exchange in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in mind, the notion of cosmopolitanism, as addressing sites and narratives of encounter between the center and the periphery or the periphery and the center, offers one way of approaching these concerns.

Doll Encounters, a panel at the (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:00pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California, Riverside

When we encounter dolls as grown-ups, what is it that we are encountering? What might personal and cultural doll-identifications betray about relationships with the past, with gender and sexuality, with play, with tenderness and with terror? This panel invites submissions which reflect upon the sociocultural meaning of the doll as text, as artifact, or, more traditionally, as an enduring literary and filmic obsession. In psychoanalysis as well as in the popular imagination, dolls have long played the role of uncanny object. This panel is particularly interested in the way in which new technologies, products and markets have uncannily reproduced, intensified and responded to anxieties and hauntings from the past.

Embodied Encounters, a panel at (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 5:56pm
University of California, Riverside

This year's (dis)junctions conference invites papers for a panel exploring the concept of "encountering" as it relates to issues of embodiment and sensory perception. In traditional conceptions of knowledge and of reading, the visual has maintained a privileged and almost disembodied epistemological position. With the rise of critical perspectives exploring the materiality of the body, the primacy of sight as an interpretive strategy for a textual encounter has been called into question. How can bodily awareness and embodied encounters subvert this dominant reading paradigm?

Encountering Celebrity, a panel at (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb. 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 5:53pm
University of California, Riverside

Studies of celebrity, fame, notoriety, and stardom have become increasingly complex and important in our media saturated society. Beginning with studies of fame--which focused on a wide variety of figures that operated in the public sphere, including politicians, religious figures, and military heroes--and studies of stardom--which interrogated stars like Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Diahann Carroll and Lucille Ball as symbols of societal fears, prejudices, and desires--the field of celebrity studies has continued to evolve, accommodating the changes in media and the relationship between the individual and the public sphere in the 21st century.

Critical Digital Humanities panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 5:49pm
University of California, Riverside

In keeping with this year's (dis)junctions conference theme, Encounters With(in) Texts, this panel invites papers that explore the notion of encounter within the context of Critical Digital Humanities. The conference theme theorizes that encountering is related to, but hardly synonymous with interaction and mediation - two theoretical lenses more frequently deployed within the Digital Humanities field. As such, one area in which papers on this panel might focus, then, is in further explicating the theoretical constellation made up by these three terms. How can we further theorize the differences and similarities within mediation, interaction, and encounter?

"Blackness" in Contemporary African American Artistic Expression, a panel at (dis)junctions 2013, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb. 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 5:45pm
University of California, Riverside

In the spirit of the (dis)junctions theme of encounters which "stress[es] a sense of unanticipated or oppositional" as it interacts with the traditionally endorsed, this panel seeks to address ways in which these "meetings" of traditional and contemporary artistic expressions of "blackness" have changed since 9/11 as it relates, comments, critiques, and augments on the traditionally endorsed definitions of artistic expression.

Animal Studies Panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 5:38pm
University of California, Riverside

This year's (dis)junctions conference, themed around "Encounters With(in) Texts," invites papers for a panel exploring the concept of "encountering" through the perspective of animal or animality studies. Since Derrida's theorization of the transformative possibilities inherent in an exchange of gazes with an animal other, animal studies has drawn attention to the ways that unanticipated and reciprocal encounters with other species shape our understanding of species difference and interspecies communication.

Shaw and Adaptation [MLA 2014 in Chicago; JANUARY 9-12, 2014]

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 5:37pm
Modern Language Association

*Sponsored by the International Shaw Society*

Please send abstracts of 250 words and CVs as well as queries by March 15, 2013 to Lawrence Switzky (lawrence.switzky@utoronto.ca).

Many audiences first encounter Bernard Shaw's plays through their transformations into other genres and media. Lerner and Loewe's My Fair Lady (1956) is perhaps the most famous adaptation of Shaw's Pygmalion (1912), though the current standard print edition of the play is also an adaptation, a hybrid of Shaw's Academy Award-winning screenplay for the 1938 film and his original and revised stage scripts.

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