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[UPDATE] Virtual Encounters-Video Games, a panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:27pm
Sarah Lozier and Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

Video games are a space in which encounters are enacted on many different levels. There are encounters within the game's narrative space; encounters at the interface of player and narrative; and encounters within the external gaming space (think two-player games). These encounters can also be broken down into player-computer and player-player encounters. This panel invites papers that explore these different spaces of encounter in video games. How do these spaces disrupt normative discourses on sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, and social class? How do these encounters disrupt or challenge the player's identity? What are some implications of network-mediated encounters in massively multiplayer online games?

[UPDATE] Ding Dong Hostess is Dead, a panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:25pm
Sarah Lozier and Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

On November 16, 2012, Hostess announced that, rather than cave to striking bakers' demands, they were closing their doors for good. Within hours of this official announcement reaching the digital environment, the information went viral, and people flocked to grocery stores to stock up on these iconic, American, cream-filled snacks. This panel invites papers that explore the cultural implications of this event within the context of encounters. Papers submitted to this panel may address the following questions: how does the Hostess corporation structure encounters of American culture and Americana? How does its long history of labor struggles contribute to or critique our understanding of laboring classes, peoples, and organizations in America?

[UPDATE] Transnational American Literatures, a panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:23pm
Sarah Lozier and Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

Immigration and migration call into question the boundaries of American literature. As writers from all over the world reside in the United States and as writers from the United States often take on global themes, U.S. literature seems to be moving away from a national practice towards a global one. This panel invites papers that concern themselves with transnational American literature. Paper submitted to this panel may address the following questions: What differing or related perspectives on globalization emerge in American literature and postcolonial literature? How does the global flow of capital influence textual production, circulation and reception of texts?

[UPDATE] 20th/21st Century Poetics, a panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:21pm
Sarah Lozier and Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

The twentieth and twenty-first centuries have seen the explosion of new, experimental poetic forms within literary circles. From the highly restrictive forms of the Oulipo movement, to the blurring of lines between prose and poetry, to the rejection of the Lyric or narrative poem in L=A=N=G=U=A=G=E, sound, and concrete poetry movements, encounters with(in) this period's poetry offer fruitful sites for critical interrogation.

[UPDATE] Critical Digital Humanities panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:18pm
Sarah Lozier and Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

n keeping with this year's (dis)junctions conference theme, Encounters With(in) Texts, this panel invites papers that explore the notion of encounter within the context of Critical Digital Humanities. The conference theme theorizes that encountering is related to, but hardly synonymous with interaction and mediation - two theoretical lenses more frequently deployed within the Digital Humanities field. As such, one area in which papers on this panel might focus, then, is in further explicating the theoretical constellation made up by these three terms. How can we further theorize the differences and similarities within mediation, interaction, and encounter?

[UPDATE] Doll Encounters, a panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:15pm
Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

When we encounter dolls as grown-ups, what is it that we are encountering? What might personal and cultural doll-identifications betray about relationships with the past, with gender and sexuality, with play, with tenderness and with terror? This panel invites submissions which reflect upon the sociocultural meaning of the doll as text, as artifact, or, more traditionally, as an enduring literary and filmic obsession. In psychoanalysis as well as in the popular imagination, dolls have long played the role of uncanny object. This panel is particularly interested in the way in which new technologies, products and markets have uncannily reproduced, intensified and responded to anxieties and hauntings from the past.

[UPDATE] 20th Annual (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:12pm
Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

This year's (dis)junctions conference at UCR invites papers that contribute to conversations around notions of "encountering," with particular focus given to the operation of texts, understood as representational media objects, within "scenes of encounter."

Encounter: transitive verb
1 a: to meet as an adversary b: to engage in conflict with
2: to come upon face-to-face
3: to come upon or experience especially unexpectedly

[UPDATE] Romantic Circulations, a panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 2:06pm
Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

This panel invites submissions dealing with any aspect of circulation, distribution and discovery in the Romantic period. With the conference theme of 'encounters' and the the proliferation of global/local exchange in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries in mind, the notion of cosmopolitanism, as addressing sites and narratives of encounter between the center and the periphery or the periphery and the center, offers one way of approaching these concerns.

[UPDATE] Rhetoric and Poetics panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:56pm
Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

In Rhetorical Power, rhetorical and literary theorist Steven Mailloux defines rhetoric as "the political effectivity of trope and argument in culture" (xii). Crucially, this definition resists the not uncommon understandings of rhetoric as mere "eloquence," as florid, deceptive language, or as "persuasive discourse," instead foregrounding rhetoric as a methodology or lens for identifying the roles of historical and socio-political power relations in shaping how and why certain tropes, arguments, and language use prove effective in the first place.

[UPDATE] Encountering Early Modern/Medieval Texts panel at (dis)junctions Grad Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE EXTENDED to Feb 22

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 1:51pm
Josh Pearson, University of California Riverside

This year's (dis)junctions conference theme focuses on "encounters," with an emphasis of the term's foregrounding of the unexpected. However, under these conditions, true "encounters" with texts of the early modern and medieval periods, texts which have been repeatedly studied for hundreds of years, may seem unlikely. Can we truly "encounter" Shakespeare's texts (or Chaucer's, or Milton's), or is that encounter always mediated by an already-constructed knowledge formation? This panel invites the submission of papers which address this improbable phenomenon of encountering the early modern and/or medieval text.

[UPDATE] Media in Transition 8: public media, private media CFP deadline is March 1 (conference: May 3-5 at MIT)

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 12:07pm
MIT Comparative Media Studies / MIT Communications Forum

http://web.mit.edu/comm-forum/mit8

Media in Transition 8: public media, private media

International Conference

Conference dates: May 3-5, 2013 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA.

 

Featured Speakers Include:

Roderick Coover, Dept. of Film and Media Studies, Temple University

Henry Jenkins, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, USC

Jose van Dijck, Dept. of Media Studies, University of Amsterdam

Trespassing Journal Second Issue Now Online

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 6:13am
Trespassing Journal: An Online Journal of Art, Science, and Philosophy

The second issue of international peer-reviewed publication Trespassing Journal: An Online Journal of Trespassing Art, Science,and Philosophy (ISSN 2147-2734) hosts essays that address "Trespassing Genre" in relation to various media including cinema and literature. The issue is now online under the Creative Commons License at http://trespassingjournal.com/

(Re)Presenting the Archive

updated: 
Tuesday, February 12, 2013 - 5:03am
University of Sheffield, UK

In a Higher Education context where originality in research is increasingly valorised, what place is there for explicitly re-presentational practices such as scholarly editing and curating? At first glance, the REF2014 landscape would seem favourable. The panel guidelines recognise "scholarly editions", "databases" and "electronic resources" as outputs, and promote "the creation of archival or specialist collections to support the research infrastructure". Edition and curation also produce tangible results—including printed and digital texts, catalogues and exhibitions—that can impact beyond the academy, preserving and presenting materials for a general audience. But what is the value of these activities and how can it be measured?

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