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Hypervisibility III - Beyond the Closet: Coming-Out Narratives in Transnational Visual Cultures

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 2:44pm
University of Ottawa, Canada

In 'La Queer Theory est made in the USA', Lawrence R. Schehr underlines the pitfalls on an uncritical, un-problematized re-appropriation of Queer Theory to national and cultural contexts other than its original one (North America). Queer Theory itself is predicated upon specific signifiers characteristic of the English-speaking context, that is the closet metaphor (which determines visibility in binary terms) and homophobia. Eager to challenge universalising North American queer thought, Schehr argues for Post-Queer Theory instead, a theory that would extend the problematique of Queer Theory to other national contexts while taking into account the specificities of other cultural environments.

RENT ASSEMBLY: Call for Proposals

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 2:04pm
The Kootenay School of Writing and The Mainlander

Rent Assembly: Call for Proposals
a gathering of renters in a time of siege

Deadline for Proposals: March 31, 2013
Rent Assembly: May 24, 25, 26, 2013

Vancouver, BC – Unceded Coast Salish territory

'The rentiers reap what they do not sow.'
–Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations (1776)

CALLL FOR PAPER: APRIL 2013, LAST DATE 20 MARCH ISSN 2320-4397

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 12:21pm
GLOBAL JOURNAL OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Papers are invited for the Volume 1, Issue 2 of the Global Journal of English Language and Literature (ISSN 2320-4397) to be published in April 2013.

VISIT https://sites.google.com/site/globaljournalofell/

The journal features densely theoretical and analytical writings that focus on various aspects of English Studies which address/approach the research problems with methods of and insights borrowed from multiple established disciplines. Accepted papers will be published after peer-review process. There are no publication fees or handling charges. The last date for submission is March 20th, 2013.

16th Ohrid Summer University: International Summer School "Understanding Byzantium in the Balkans", 15-24 August 2013

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 11:56am
Euro-Balkan University, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia

International Summer School

"UNDERSTANDING BYZANTIUM IN THE BALKANS:

WHERE THE EAST MET/PARTED FROM THE WEST"

15 - 24 August 2013, Ohrid, Republic of Macedonia

- Call for Applications -

CONFIRMED LECTURERS:

Professor JONATHAN SHEPARD, University of Cambridge, Great Britain
Professor FLORIN CURTA, University of Florida, United States

COURSES OFFERED:

Course title: THE GRAVITATIONAL FIELDS OF EAST AND WEST ACROSS THE MEDIEVAL BALKANS

Course title: THE BEGINNING OF THE MIDDLE AGES IN THE BALKANS

Director of the Summer School:
Professor Mitko B. Panov, Euro-Balkan University

SUMMER SCHOOL DESCRIPTION

CFP: Identity and Conflict in Cultural and Geo-Political Contexts

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 11:40am
HYPERION UNIVERSITY OF BUCHAREST

HYPERION UNIVERSITY OF BUCHAREST

INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

THE

"LETTERS AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES" DEPARTMENT

CALL FOR PAPERS

THE DEPARTMENT OF "LETTERS AND FOREIGN LANGUAGES" OF
THE FACULTY OF SOCIAL, HUMANISTIC AND NATURAL SCIENCES

INVITES YOU
TO SEND PAPER PROPOSALS TO OUR CONFERENCE ENTITLED

Identity and Conflict in Cultural and Geo-Political Contexts

Date: 13-14 June, 2013
Venue: The Faculty of Social, Humanistic and Natural Sciencies, Department of "Letters and Foreign Languages"
Str. Calea Călăraşilor, nr. 169, Bucharest, Romania

[UPDATE - DEADLINE EXTENDED] Thinking with John Berger, 4-5 September 2014

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 10:54am
Cardiff Metropolitan University, UK

Thinking with John Berger
A 2-day conference at Cardiff Metropolitan University
Cardiff, Wales, UK
4-5 September 2014

Keynote speakers:
Professor Bruce Robbins (Columbia University)
Professor Peter de Bolla (University of Cambridge)

Call for papers

[UPDATE] South Central MLA Biography/Autobiography/Memoir panel

updated: 
Sunday, February 3, 2013 - 10:08am
South Central Modern Language Association

The 2012 South Central MLA Conference is accepting paper proposals for its Biography/Autobiography/Memoir panel. Literary paper proposals on any aspect of biography, autobiography, and memoir are welcome. Papers should be no longer than 15-minutes when read aloud. Please submit a 200-word abstract by 4/1/13 to mge1108@gmail.com.

The SCMLA conference will be held in New Orleans, LA from October 3-5, 2013.

Histories and Futures of Reading, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:30pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

At the close of the twentieth century, the proliferation of networked digital technologies has led a number of critics to call into question the future of reading. However, in the last several years it has become increasingly clear that reading continues to be an important aspect of our cultural practice, even as it manifests itself in multiple forms. This panel invites papers that concern themselves with both the history and the future of reading. Paper submitted to this panel may address the following questions: How have reading practices changed over time in a given historical period? What kinds of reading practices are specific to print culture and/or networked digital culture and what practices span both?

Religion and Pop Culture, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:26pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

Despite claims that modernity is disenchanted and secular, one encounters religion everywhere. References to religion appear in many different pop culture media, whether as themes and topics or as casual references, character building, or background elements. Conversely, religious groups or institutions appropriate pop culture forms in order to reach new subsections of believers, proselytize to outsiders, or provide general messages for society at large. Consider the ways in which religion appears in popular novels like Moore's Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal, themes in music like Green Day's 21st Century Breakdown, or television programs like Futurama, South Park, or Family Guy.

Science Fiction and the "Worldly",, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:23pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

In "Reflections on Exile", Edward Said writes that theoretical interventions need to engage with the "worldly situation", the messy, unstable mosaic through which the long history of colonialism affects a diverse set of political affiliations, global disparities, international divisions of labor, regional rivalries, national identities, cosmopolitan ideologies, green, queer, and leftist movements. Science fiction, likewise, has seen a recent surge in interest and scrutiny devoted to postcolonial and global problematics including works by Istvan Csicsery-Ronay Jr. (2003), John Reider (2008), and Patricia Kerslake (2011).

Modern Horror, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:20pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, Univeristy of California Riverside

The horror genre is structured around encounters with the unknown. Yet the meaning of these encounters (narratively, as well as in terms of race, class, gender, and sexuality) remains in flux, even within overarching myths such as that of the vampire. One example is the Swedish novel Let the Right One In, which centers around a boy's encounter with a MTF transgender vampire. This text simultaneously employs the threat of Cold War ideologies, with the possible invasion into Sweden by Soviet missiles triangulated around the drama of "encountering," and befriending, the vampire. This panel invites papers that analyze such complex modern encounters within horror, and how the genre stages encounters with social, political, and economic concerns.

Our Text, Your Text, This Text, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:17pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

This panel invites papers that explore textual encounter and interaction within religion. For many religious traditions, their religious texts become paramount—questions of texts' creation, authenticity, authority, vision, revision, and reception, to name just a few, comprise a significant part of the field. So too are questions of interpretation of texts and their messages over centuries or millennia, or when transported into a diasporic context. Who owns a text? Who has the right to interpret, create, or modify texts? What changes over time? What should? What authority does the text itself have? All of these questions and more vary widely by time, place, and religious tradition.

DingDong Hostess is Dead, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:15pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

On November 16, 2012, Hostess announced that, rather than cave to striking bakers' demands, they were closing their doors for good. Within hours of this official announcement reaching the digital environment, the information went viral, and people flocked to grocery stores to stock up on these iconic, American, cream-filled snacks. This panel invites papers that explore the cultural implications of this event within the context of encounters. Papers submitted to this panel may address the following questions: how does the Hostess corporation structure encounters of American culture and Americana? How does its long history of labor struggles contribute to or critique our understanding of laboring classes, peoples, and organizations in America?

Virtual Encounters-Video Games, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Saturday, February 2, 2013 - 6:12pm
Josh Pearson and Sarah Lozier, University of California Riverside

Video games are a space in which encounters are enacted on many different levels. There are encounters within the game's narrative space; encounters at the interface of player and narrative; and encounters within the external gaming space (think two-player games). These encounters can also be broken down into player-computer and player-player encounters. This panel invites papers that explore these different spaces of encounter in video games. How do these spaces disrupt normative discourses on sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, and social class? How do these encounters disrupt or challenge the player's identity? What are some implications of network-mediated encounters in massively multiplayer online games?

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