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CFP: [Renaissance] Ecofeminist collection, Early Modern Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 1:35am
Jen Munroe

Nearly thirty years ago, Carolyn Merchant proposed new ways to look at
the various mechanisms that “sanctioned the domination of both nature and
women” (Death of Nature xxi). Today, scholars have made great strides in
locating these mechanisms in various periods and places important to
American, British, and World literatures, but scholars of early modern
literature have yet to consider them at length. Ecocritical studies of
Shakespeare, Milton, and others have challenged the way early modern
scholars understand the relationship between human beings and the natural
world in the period, but these studies still tend to focus on humans in a

UPDATE: [Theory] American Indians Today

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 12:46am
Richard L. Allen

Call for Papers: American Indians Today
Abstract/Proposals by 15 December 2008
February 25-28, 2009

Southwest/Texas Popular & American Popular Culture Associations 30th
Annual Conference

Albuquerque, NM. February 25-28, 2009
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
330 Tijeras
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Phone: 1.505.842.1234
Fax: 1.505.766.6710

CFP: [20th] Essay Collection on the Sitwells

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 10:49pm
Allan Pero

This CFP is for a proposed collection of essays on the works of the
Sitwells. In New Bearings in English Poetry, F.R. Leavis condemned the
Sitwells to "the history of publicity rather than of poetry." However,
the Sitwells, individually and as a trio, were not only significant
contributors to the fields of poetry, fiction, memoir, belles lettres,
art history, travel writing, and biography, they were also key players in
the popularization of Modernism and in the development of "celebrity"
and "scandal" in cultural production. This volume of essays will
contribute to a renewed interest in the Sitwells' work and their place in
the history of Modernism. The editors particularly welcome proposals that

UPDATE: [Film] American Indian/Indigenous Film Area

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 9:41pm
M. Elise Marubbio

Southwest/Texas Popular & American Culture Associations 30th Anniversary
Conference, Albuquerque, NM

February 24-28, 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico at the Hyatt Regency
downtown.

The American Indian/Indigenous Film Area is looking for panels, papers, and
workshops on topics related to American Indian, First Nations, and
Indigenous film. We welcome proposals from all disciplines that examine,
utilize, promote, or teach Native/Indigenous film and media are welcome.
The American Indian/Indigenous Film Area is particularly interested in
bringing together Native filmmakers and Native/non-Native academics to talk
about the burgeoning field of Indigenous Film.

CFP: [Collections] Freelance Writers - Literary Essays (#2295)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 9:06pm
Betsy Oski

EBSCO Publishing seeks freelance writers for a new series of literary
criticism that will appear in print as well as in our award winning
Literary Reference Center database. EBSCO databases are widely used by
both academic and public libraries worldwide and are perceived as
excellent and authoritative sources for research materials.

The volumes in the series cover a wide variety of prominent works and
authors, focusing most heavily on American and British literature from
the 19th and 20th centuries. Essays are 5,000 words in length and should
be researched and documented in MLA citation style.

CFP: [18th] Expanding Borders: MWASECS 2009

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 7:34pm
Jeanne Hageman

The Eighteenth Century ushered in a period of unprecedented expansion. We
most often think of the expansion of the physical borders: the colonies,
the exploration of new worlds and new territories, and the creation of
new countries through revolution, conquest and war. But just as the
physical boundaries were exploding, so were other long-standing frontiers
within societies themselves: social, sexual, class and mercantile
borders, among others, began to change. How did the authors and
explorers, actors and playwrights, philosophers and libertines expand the
limits and boundaries imposed upon them by the world around them? How did
they express their discontent and present their discoveries and

CFP: [Theatre] Journeys Across Media

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 7:12pm
Reina-Marie Loader

THE NU-ROMANTIC
Revealing the developing artistic milieu in Film, Theatre and Television

   17th of April 2009, University of Reading

CALL FOR PAPERS
 

Romanticism was a cultural landscape characterised by the eternal
oscillation between a ‘modern’ enthusiasm that had failed and a
‘postmodern’ irony that would soon falter. Now, years later, another scene
marked by oscillations is taking shape.

CFP: [Film] Journeys Across Media

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 7:12pm
Reina-Marie Loader

THE NU-ROMANTIC
Revealing the developing artistic milieu in Film, Theatre and Television

   17th of April 2009, University of Reading

CALL FOR PAPERS
 

Romanticism was a cultural landscape characterised by the eternal
oscillation between a ‘modern’ enthusiasm that had failed and a
‘postmodern’ irony that would soon falter. Now, years later, another scene
marked by oscillations is taking shape.

CFP: [Ethnic] Teaching Native American Women's Writing (SSAWW 11/21-11/24 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 6:41pm
Lynn Domina

Teaching Native American Women’s Writing

For a conference sponsored by the Society for the Study of American Women
Writers to be held in Philadelphia, Oct. 21-24, 2009, I would like to
propose a panel on Teaching Native American Women’s Writing. Possible
topics include incorporating native women’s material in survey courses,
special topics courses on native women’s writing or on a particular
native woman writer, teaching native material to predominantly non-native
students, methods for teaching particular texts, secondary material
useful for the study of particular writers, etc. Any time period or
genre. Please send proposals to Lynn Domina at dominalm_at_delhi.edu by Dec.
15, 2008.

CFP: [American] Teaching Native American Women's Writing (SSAWW 11/21-11/24 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 6:41pm
Lynn Domina

Teaching Native American Women’s Writing

For a conference sponsored by the Society for the Study of American Women
Writers to be held in Philadelphia, Oct. 21-24, 2009, I would like to
propose a panel on Teaching Native American Women’s Writing. Possible
topics include incorporating native women’s material in survey courses,
special topics courses on native women’s writing or on a particular
native woman writer, teaching native material to predominantly non-native
students, methods for teaching particular texts, secondary material
useful for the study of particular writers, etc. Any time period or
genre. Please send proposals to Lynn Domina at dominalm_at_delhi.edu by Dec.
15, 2008.

CFP: [Graduate] Difficulty, Intransigence, Failure

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 5:05pm
Robert Higney

Johns Hopkins University
2009 English Department Graduate Conference
April 24-25, 2009

“Difficulty, Intransigence, Failure”

Keynote Speaker: Heather K. Love, University of Pennsylvania

UPDATE: [Graduate] Memory and Remembering (in) the Middle Ages ––– DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 4:56pm
Jonathan Eskew

Relics, Resurrections, and Reconstructions: Memory and Remembering(s) in
the Middle Ages
A conference presented by the Columbia University Medieval Guild

The Columbia University Medieval Guild with the support of Columbia
Department of English and Comparative Literature is pleased to announce
that it will be holding its 19th Annual Interdisclipinary Graduate Student
Conference on 24 January, 2009. The topic for this year is memory both
personal and public in all of its abstract and physical represenations and
incarnations in the medieval period. Possible topics include but are not
limited to:

UPDATE: [Medieval] Memory and Remembering (in) the Middle Ages ––– DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 4:55pm
Jonathan Eskew

Relics, Resurrections, and Reconstructions: Memory and Remembering(s) in
the Middle Ages
A conference presented by the Columbia University Medieval Guild

The Columbia University Medieval Guild with the support of Columbia
Department of English and Comparative Literature is pleased to announce
that it will be holding its 19th Annual Interdisclipinary Graduate Student
Conference on 24 January, 2009. The topic for this year is memory both
personal and public in all of its abstract and physical represenations and
incarnations in the medieval period. Possible topics include but are not
limited to:

CFP: [General] Call for Papers, Society for the Philosophical Study of Education

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 3:33pm
Allan Johnston

Call for Papers
SPSE at APA

The Society for the Philosophical Study of Education (SPSE) is hosting two
sessions at the Spring 2009 Central Division Meeting of the American
Philosophical Association (APA), February 18-21, 2009, Palmer House Hilton
Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. We are seeking presenters for the following
sessions:

Session 1: Paternalism and Teachers’ Authority (Thursday, February 19,
9:00 am â€" Noon)

Session 2: Critical Thinking and Curriculum (Friday, February 20, 7:30 â€"
10:30 pm)

SPSE will also hold a business meeting at APA.

CFP: [General] SENSE AND SUSTAINABLITY: Green approaches to reading (March 13-14, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 12:57pm
U. Montreal EGSS

University of Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
English Graduate Students Society

SENSE AND SUSTAINABLITY: Green approaches to reading (March 13-14, 2009)
http://www.egss-umontreal.org/colloquium/
http://www.egss-umontreal.org/colloquium/poster.html

DATES: Friday March 13- Saturday March 14, 2009
Département d'études anglaises
University of Montreal, Pavilion Jean-Coutu
http://www.umontreal.ca/plancampus/pavillons/pav21.html

CFP: [General] TARS: PERSONAE, HETERONYMS, PSEUDONYMS. Department of Comparative Literature, Stanford University

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 4:19am
Christopher Donaldson

CALL FOR PAPERS
Department of Comparative Literature, Stanford University
3rd Annual Graduate Student Conference
April 10-11, 2009

AVATARS: PERSONAE, HETERONYMS, PSEUDONYMS
__________________________________________________________________________

"Every individual human being, one may say, carries within him,
potentially and prescriptively, an ideal man, the archetype of a human
being, and it is his life's task to be, through all his changing
manifestations, in harmony with the unchanging unity of this ideal."
    --Friedrich Schiller, Letters on the Aesthetic Education of Man (1795)

CFP: [Graduate] AVATARS: PERSONAE, HETERONYMS, PSEUDONYMS. STANFORD UNIVERSITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 4:16am
Christopher Donaldson

                          CALL FOR PAPERS
       Department of Comparative Literature, Stanford University
                3rd Annual Graduate Student Conference
                         April 10-11, 2009
 
                             AVATARS
                 PERSONAE, HETERONYMS, PSEUDONYMS
__________________________________________________________________________

CFP: [Rhetoric-Composition] Writing as Exploration and Discovery

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 3:41am
Vincent Walsh

In this paper I describe a novel form of writing pedagogy that encourages
students to select their own topics for papers based on course readings
and class discussion. The purpose behind this approach is to facilitate a
process by which students are enabled to engage in a personal way with
their writing, in effect, to "own" their own writing process. Too often,
students write for the professor, responding to prompts or assigned
topics, assuming that what they produce has to be "what the professor
wants to hear." In effect, they become alientated from what they write,
trying to conform to a standard of evaluation that is outside themselves.
Since students will be doing a great deal of writing beyond

CFP: [Film] Representations of the Serial Killer in Film and Television

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 2:14am
Alzena D'Costa

Representations of the Serial Killer in Film and Television

Deadline for submissions: 23 January 2009
Contact: Alzena D’Costa
Email: A.D’Costa_at_curtin.edu.au

I invite contributions for an edited collection that examines
representations of the serial killer in film and television. The serial
killer has become increasingly prevalent in popular culture. It is the aim
of this book to explore the socio-political reasons for the emergence of
this cultural figure, and to examine how representations of the serial
killer and serial killing function to address contemporary cultural
concerns and preoccupations.

CFP: [Graduate] Projection: Speculating on Presence, Absence, and Nonsense

updated: 
Monday, November 24, 2008 - 11:22pm
Mia Chen

Projection: Speculating on Presence, Absence, and Nonsense
March 6, 2009
The Graduate Center of the City University of New York
English Students’ Association Annual Conference

Avaunt! and quit my sight! let the earth hide thee!
Thy bones are marrowless, thy blood is cold;
Thou hast no speculation in those eyes
Which thou dost glare with.
-- Macbeth (III, iv)

UPDATE: [American] Hawthorne's Later Writings, Journal Submission

updated: 
Monday, November 24, 2008 - 11:20pm
Monika Elbert

       
A special issue on Hawthorne's final period of writing is being planned for
the fall 2009 issue of the _Nathaniel Hawthorne Review_. In quantitative
terms, the literary writings of this period make up a substantial portion
of Hawthorne's oeuvre, filling more than three volumes of the Centenary
edition. Though once much maligned, these late works have begun to attract
the serious attention from scholars they once seemed destined for. When
Septimius Felton was posthumously published in 1872, many critics were
enthusiastic â€" the reviewer of the London Times declared that "it will be
read for its poetry and fancy by many who care but little for fiction in

UPDATE: [Gender Studies] Queer Autobiography- Last week

updated: 
Monday, November 24, 2008 - 10:55pm
Richard Maguire

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Queer_at_King’s Research Centre presents a one-day conference on queer
autobiography:

TELL IT LIKE IT IS. TELL IT LIKE IT ISN’T â€" QUEER LIVES REMODELLED

Friday June 12th 2009

 
‘Tell It Like It Is. Tell It Like It Isn’t’ continues on from 2004’s
successful ‘Queer Lives’ symposium which examined the ways we chronicle
the varied stories of our multiple queer selves. There are still more
stories to be told.

CFP: [Poetry] Call for Submissions: The New Scene Quarterly

updated: 
Monday, November 24, 2008 - 10:28pm
Anthony Guilbert

The New Scene Quarterly, on-line, is currently accepting submissions for
its Jan. 2009 issue. We are looking for submissions in the following
categories.

• NONFICTION:
We are actively looking for non-fiction that revolves around the art and
craft of writing; profiles on interesting writers; and memoirs that capture
the American literary experience. Submissions should be between 1000 and
3500 words.

• POETRY:
The best way to classify what we are looking for would be to call it 21st
Century Americana; that is, poetry that best represents the state of
America in the 21st Century. Please limit submissions to between 3 to 6
poems per entry.

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