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Stories from Women and Children who have been Treated Unjustly by the Hague Convention

updated: 
Saturday, May 26, 2012 - 11:25pm
Hagued http://hagued.com

Hagued is a space for women and children to share their experiences of the Hague Convention. The Hague Convention is an international law that aims to return children to their home country so custody can be sorted out. Unfortunately, it often fails the women it is supposed to protect.

Many women who have been accused of international child abduction have only fled to escape the violent fathers of their children. But the Hague Convention doesn't take into consideration why the mother fled. Escaping from family violence rarely works as a defence in Hague Convention cases.

Stories from Women and Children who have been Treated Unjustly by the Hague Convention

updated: 
Saturday, May 26, 2012 - 11:19pm
Hagued http://hagued.com

Hagued is a space for women and children to share their experiences of the Hague Convention. The Hague Convention is an international law that aims to return children to their home country so custody can be sorted out. Unfortunately, it often fails the women it is supposed to protect.

Many women who have been accused of international child abduction have only fled to escape the violent fathers of their children. But the Hague Convention doesn't take into consideration why the mother fled. Escaping from family violence rarely works as a defence in Hague Convention cases.

Creating "Contact Zones" for General Studies' Learning Communities

updated: 
Saturday, May 26, 2012 - 10:17am
Anthony Dotterman/Adelphi University

While General Studies Programs--as Eric Platt's New York Times article "General Studies Moves to the Mainstream" attests--have begun to transcend their initial status as obscure, niche programs, anecdotal evidence suggests that General Studies' students and faculty still struggle with an institutional prejudice that consigns these programs as a dumping ground for "high school graduates [whose]academic success [has] fallen short of their peers" (Platt). Additionally, the very support structures of General Studies programs that enable these students to succeed in college-- smaller classes, close faculty tutoring , mentoring and advising--reinforce, ironically, institutional prejudice against these programs and its members.

Women, Culture, and the 25th January 2011 Egyptian Revolution - 15-17 November 2012 (The University of Manchester)

updated: 
Saturday, May 26, 2012 - 8:22am
Dr Dalia Said Mostafa (Manchester University), and Dr Shuruq Naguib (Lancaster University)

This is a call for papers for two related workshops which will take place in November 2012 (at the University of Manchester) and in March 2013 (in Cairo). This project is funded by the CBRL-BRISMES Research Network (UK), with the aim of emphasising the leading role of Egyptian women activists, writers, and artists in the revolutionary process. In this context, we perceive the 25th January Egyptian Revolution as a process in the making: there were many important catalysts for the revolution over the past decade in Egypt manifested in a significant rise in street protests and demonstrations by large sectors in the society (e.g.

The World Congress on E-Commerce and Business on the Web (WCEBW 2012)

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 10:35pm
The Society of Digital Information and Wireless Communications (SDIWC)

You are invited to participate in The World Congress on E-Commerce and Business on the Web that will be held at London Metropolitan University, on Aug. 27-29, 2012. The event will be held over three days, with presentations delivered by researchers from the international community, including presentations from keynote speakers and state-of-the-art lectures.
Topics are but not limited to below:

Polari Journal (queer writing)

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 9:19pm
Polari Journal

Call for Submission Extended AGAIN

Due to unforseen circumstances, the April issue of Polari Journal will now be published in mid August 2012. As a result, the open call for submissions has been extended further (see below).

Polari Journal of queer writing is holding an open call for submissions for its next issue (published August 2012). There is no specific theme for this issue; however Polari tends towards the shorter forms: short stories, poetry, essays, scholarly papers, one act plays/scripts and reviews. In general, the word limit for fiction, plays and essays is 6000 words. Reviews should not be more than 1500 words. For poetry, the maximum is 100 lines.

At this time financial remuneration is not offered.

Word and Image (NeMLA, Boston, MA, March 21-24, 2013)

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 6:18pm
Gillian Pierce, Boston University

This panel considers the interplay between word and image in works of literature, or in works that defy categorization as either fiction or nonfiction. How does photography function as an "effet de réel" in works by André Breton or W. G. Sebald, for example? How do ekphrastic texts function in relation to an absent visual "other"? Please send 300-word abstracts to Gillian Pierce (gpierce@bu.edu)by September 30, 2012.

Imagining Middle Eastern/Oriental women in the West: An Orientalist Legacy Borrowed from the Past? July 2/ Nov. 8-11, 2012.

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 5:40pm
The 54th Annual M/MLA Convention- Cincinnati, Ohio

Imagining Middle Eastern/Oriental Women in the West: An Orientalist Legacy Borrowed from the Past?

This panel seeks papers which investigate the image of the Middle Eastern/Muslim women in the West constructed throughout centuries and the manner in which these images are deployed and interpreted by the Western audiences. Thus, the panel is open to a wide range of literary periods, such as the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Long Eighteenth Century, Victorian Period, as well as Modern and Post-modern Literatures. Due to the multidisciplinary nature of the topic under investigation papers dealing with history, sociology and religion which build on literary texts are welcome as well.

[Extended Deadline] Modernity, Ideology, and the Novel - June 15, 2012

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 3:29pm
Modern Horizons Journal

In collaboration with the Institute for the Humanities at Simon Fraser University, Modern Horizons' second annual conference will take place in Vancouver, BC from October 25th to 27th at SFU's Harbour Centre. We invite abstracts for 20-minute presentations that explore the theme of 'Modernity, Ideology, and the Novel.'

Modern Language Studies - Book Reviews

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 12:50pm
Susquehanna University

Modern Language Studies, the journal of the Northeast Modern Language Association, is seeking reviews for the winter 2012 issue.

I am especially interested in reviews of primary sources (including scholarly editions, contemporary literature, art, film, comic books, visual and popular culture), pedagogical works, and hypertext publications. However, reviews are no longer restricted to these categories.

Graduate students are welcome to contribute to the journal. Please submit your review electronically (as a Word attachment) to Randy Robertson, Reviews Editor of MLS, at robertson@susqu.edu.

[UPDATE] Modernist Cultures: Proposed Special Issue on Comics and Modernism (extended deadline: 20 June 2012)

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 12:02pm
Modernist Cultures Special Issue

In Projections (2012), Jared Gardner calls comics "perhaps the most understudied of the vernacular modernisms of the twentieth century." This proposal for a special issue of Modernist Cultures (Edinburgh UP) on comics and modernism intends to develop and in some cases initiate critical conversations on the relationships between modernism and comics.

[UPDATE] Call for Papers - Why Comparative Literature - ICLA, 2013

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 10:31am
International Comparative Literature Association

The loose boundaries of comparative literature have continuously raised questions about the scholarly value and practical use of the field. This seminar proposes to explore the significance of comparative literature as academic discipline where the worth of global literatures in the field of humanities is persistently challenged by the pragmatic orientation of public opinion.

The Politics of Violence in Contemporary Latin American Cinema

updated: 
Friday, May 25, 2012 - 9:21am
Monica Filimon and Henry Tarco-Carrera/NEMLA 2013

This NEMLA 2013 session will examine the social, moral, and aesthetic implications of violence as it has been conceptualized in post-2000 Latin American cinema. The panel aims to start a discussion about the role of new Latin American cinemas in reflecting and confronting the widespread violence in the region. What role does violence play in today's communities? How is it transmitted from one generation to another? How does violence infiltrate and reshape the relationship between the sexes, races, ethnic groups, and social classes? What types of violence dominate? How and why does violence cross national borders? Is violence always transgressive or can it be legitimated? What are the moral connotations of the consumption of violent films?

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