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Our Text, Your Text, This Text, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:59pm
University of California, Riverside

This panel invites papers that explore textual encounter and interaction within religion. For many religious traditions, their religious texts become paramount—questions of texts' creation, authenticity, authority, vision, revision, and reception, to name just a few, comprise a significant part of the field. So too are questions of interpretation of texts and their messages over centuries or millennia, or when transported into a diasporic context. Who owns a text? Who has the right to interpret, create, or modify texts? What changes over time? What should? What authority does the text itself have? All of these questions and more vary widely by time, place, and religious tradition.

Histories and Futures of Reading, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:56pm
University of California, Riverside

At the close of the twentieth century, the proliferation of networked digital technologies has led a number of critics to call into question the future of reading. However, in the last several years it has become increasingly clear that reading continues to be an important aspect of our cultural practice, even as it manifests itself in multiple forms. This panel invites papers that concern themselves with both the history and the future of reading. Paper submitted to this panel may address the following questions: How have reading practices changed over time in a given historical period? What kinds of reading practices are specific to print culture and/or networked digital culture and what practices span both?

DingDong Hostess is Dead, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:52pm
University of California, Riverside

On November 16, 2012, Hostess announced that, rather than cave to striking bakers' demands, they were closing their doors for good. Within hours of this official announcement reaching the digital environment, the information went viral, and people flocked to grocery stores to stock up on these iconic, American, cream-filled snacks. This panel invites papers that explore the cultural implications of this event within the context of encounters. Papers submitted to this panel may address the following questions: how does the Hostess corporation structure encounters of American culture and Americana? How does its long history of labor struggles contribute to or critique our understanding of laboring classes, peoples, and organizations in America?

Modern Horror, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:49pm
University of California, Riverside

The horror genre is structured around encounters with the unknown. Yet the meaning of these encounters (narratively, as well as in terms of race, class, gender, and sexuality) remains in flux, even within overarching myths such as that of the vampire. One example is the Swedish novel Let the Right One In, which centers around a boy's encounter with a MTF transgender vampire. This text simultaneously employs the threat of Cold War ideologies, with the possible invasion into Sweden by Soviet missiles triangulated around the drama of "encountering," and befriending, the vampire. This panel invites papers that analyze such complex modern encounters within horror, and how the genre stages encounters with social, political, and economic concerns.

Transnational American Lit, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:44pm
University of California, Riverside

Immigration and migration call into question the boundaries of American literature. As writers from all over the world reside in the United States and as writers from the United States often take on global themes, U.S. literature seems to be moving away from a national practice towards a global one. This panel invites papers that concern themselves with transnational American literature. Paper submitted to this panel may address the following questions: What differing or related perspectives on globalization emerge in American literature and postcolonial literature? How does the global flow of capital influence textual production, circulation and reception of texts?

Virtual Encounters-Video Games, a panel at (dis)junctions Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:38pm
university of California, Riverside

Video games are a space in which encounters are enacted on many different levels. There are encounters within the game's narrative space; encounters at the interface of player and narrative; and encounters within the external gaming space (think two-player games). These encounters can also be broken down into player-computer and player-player encounters. This panel invites papers that explore these different spaces of encounter in video games. How do these spaces disrupt normative discourses on sexuality, gender, race, ethnicity, and social class? How do these encounters disrupt or challenge the player's identity? What are some implications of network-mediated encounters in massively multiplayer online games?

Embodied Encounters, a panel at (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:32pm
University of California, Riverside

This year's (dis)junctions conference invites papers for a panel exploring the concept of "encountering" as it relates to issues of embodiment and sensory perception. In traditional conceptions of knowledge and of reading, the visual has maintained a privileged and almost disembodied epistemological position. With the rise of critical perspectives exploring the materiality of the body, the primacy of sight as an interpretive strategy for a textual encounter has been called into question. How can bodily awareness and embodied encounters subvert this dominant reading paradigm?

Doll Encounters, a panel at the (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:29pm
University of California, Riverside

When we encounter dolls as grown-ups, what is it that we are encountering? What might personal and cultural doll-identifications betray about relationships with the past, with gender and sexuality, with play, with tenderness and with terror? This panel invites submissions which reflect upon the sociocultural meaning of the doll as text, as artifact, or, more traditionally, as an enduring literary and filmic obsession. In psychoanalysis as well as in the popular imagination, dolls have long played the role of uncanny object. This panel is particularly interested in the way in which new technologies, products and markets have uncannily reproduced, intensified and responded to anxieties and hauntings from the past.

Encountering Celebrity, a panel at (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference, Apr 5-6. DEADLINE Feb. 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:24pm
University of California, Riverside

Studies of celebrity, fame, notoriety, and stardom have become increasingly complex and important in our media saturated society. Beginning with studies of fame--which focused on a wide variety of figures that operated in the public sphere, including politicians, religious figures, and military heroes--and studies of stardom--which interrogated stars like Marilyn Monroe, Judy Garland, Frank Sinatra, Diahann Carroll and Lucille Ball as symbols of societal fears, prejudices, and desires--the field of celebrity studies has continued to evolve, accommodating the changes in media and the relationship between the individual and the public sphere in the 21st century.

Critical Digital Humanities panel at (dis)junctions Humanities and Social Sciences Graduate Conference. DEADLINE Feb 11

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 9:20pm
University of California, Riverside

This panel invites papers that explore the notion of encounter within the context of Critical Digital Humanities. The conference theme theorizes that encountering is related to, but hardly synonymous with interaction and mediation - two theoretical lenses more frequently deployed within the Digital Humanities field. As such, one area in which papers on this panel might focus, then, is in further explicating the theoretical constellation made up by these three terms. How can we further theorize the differences and similarities within mediation, interaction, and encounter?

[UPDATE]"Heroes & Villains" University of Calgary Free-Exchange Graduate Conference March 8-10, 2013

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 5:13pm
Free-Exchange Conference

**SUBMISSION DEADLINE EXTENDED UNTIL JANUARY 21, 2013**

"Show me a hero and I'll write you a tragedy." – F. Scott Fitzgerald

"You either die a hero or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain." – Harvey Dent, Batman: The Dark Knight

Keynote Speakers:

Richard Harrison, Mount Royal University

Aruna Srivastava, University of Calgary

Teaching Hemingway and Race

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 4:02pm
Gary Holcomb

CFP: Teaching Hemingway and Race (Kent State UP essay collection; deadline for abstracts is March 31, 2013; accepted essays due June 30, 2013)
The goal of the Teaching Hemingway series is to present collections of essays with various approaches to teaching emergent themes in Hemingway's major works to a variety of students in secondary and private schools and at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Teacher-scholars who have used Hemingway's work in domestic, international, HBCU, MA/PhD, MFA, and many other settings can apply.

"Building Cultures of Writing for Tomorrow" March 29-30, 2013 Deadline 2/1/13

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 3:22pm
SUNY Council on Writing 23rd Annual Conference

www.writing.buffalo.edu/sunycow

Friday Evening Speaker
Kelly Kinney, Binghamton
"Back to the Future: How a Nascent Program Built a Culture of Writing--and Won the CCCC Writing Program Certificate of Excellence"

Saturday Luncheon Speaker
Richard Miller, Rutgers
Author of As if Learning Mattered: Reforming Higher Education (1998) and Writing at the End of the World (2005).

[UPDATE] 9th Annual ASSC Graduate Student Conference

updated: 
Monday, January 7, 2013 - 3:11pm
Anglo-Saxon Studies Colloquium

New York University
April 4-5, 2013
Keynote by Asa Mittman (California State University, Chico) on April 4
Conference on April 5

Humans/Animals/Things

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