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[UPDATE] Wyndham Lewis: Networks, Dialogues and Communities

updated: 
Sunday, March 18, 2012 - 11:25am
Nathan Waddell / Institute of English Studies / Wyndham Lewis Society

Plenary Speakers: Dr Sara Crangle, University of Sussex (UK); Dr David James, University of Nottingham (UK); Dr Scott W. Klein, Wake Forest University (USA)

This conference's remit is to explore the numerous ways in which the modernist writer and painter Wyndham Lewis (1882-1957) belonged to cultural networks of influence and inheritance.

Virginia Woolf Miscellany: Woolf and Animals; submissions due February 1, 2013

updated: 
Sunday, March 18, 2012 - 10:14am
International Virginia Woolf Society

Virginia Woolf Miscellany, Issue #84—Fall 2013
Vara Neverow and Kristin Czarnecki
Woolf and Animals

From the animal nicknames she shared with loved ones to the purchase of "a beautiful cat, a Persian cat" with her first earnings as a writer; from the cawing rooks in To the Lighthouse to the complex life of Flush to the disturbing animal imagery in Between the Acts, animals play a key role in Woolf's life and writing. We invite submissions discussing animals in Woolf both fictional and actual. We also welcome articles that align Woolf with animal elements in the work and lives of others. Please send papers of up to 2500 words to: Kristin Czarnecki and Vara Neverow by February 1, 2013.

Staging Women's Lives in Academia (Literature and Language Workplaces)--June 1, 2012

updated: 
Sunday, March 18, 2012 - 8:06am
Michelle Masse and Nan Bauer-Maglin

We are putting together an edited collection, tentatively titled Staging Women's Lives in Academia. The subtitle, yet to be figured out, will indicate that our focus is upon women in literature and languages. The book, under serious consideration at Rutgers University Press for its new Higher Education Studies series, will focus upon nodal points of professional (graduate school, pre- and post- tenure, mid- and later- career, and retirement) and personal life for women in academia. We have two key premises: that choosing not to continue down the traditional path of academic life stages is as significant as following it, and that the usual conflation of academic and age-specific life stages is deeply gendered.

Darwin Day 2012: False Myths - Call for Artworks - 03/31/2012

updated: 
Sunday, March 18, 2012 - 7:11am
Darwin Day 2012 - University of Rome "Tor Vergata"

DARWIN DAY 2012: FALSE MYTHS

CALL FOR ARTWORKS

The theory of evolution by natural selection formulated by Charles Darwin in the second half of XIX century represented one of the most important advancement in scientific knowledge, as a major paradigm shift in human Weltanschaung. Since its apparition, however, false myths and misinterpretations of the evolution theory have appeared, which suggested both an exploitation and a strong opposition of Darwin's ideas.

Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Conference (PAMLA), October 19-21, 2012, Seattle University, deadline: April 22

updated: 
Sunday, March 18, 2012 - 1:47am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association

The 110th annual meeting of the Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association Conference will take place from October 19 to 21, 2012, at Seattle University, Seattle, Washington. We are happy to announce a call for papers for a special session panel on "Neo-Nostalgia: Re-evaluating Nostalgia in Literature and Cultural Studies:"

Neo-Nostalgia: Re-evaluating Nostalgia in Literature and Cultural Studies

Black Leadership Conference October 18-19, 2012

updated: 
Saturday, March 17, 2012 - 10:05pm
African American Studies at UNC-Greensboro

23rd Annual Conference on African American Culture and Experience (CACE)
African American Studies at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro
On the campus of UNCG in Greensboro, NC
October 18-19, 2012

Theme: "New Approaches to Black Leadership in the African Diaspora"

"Gentle Spirit"? Spenser's Poetic Influence

updated: 
Saturday, March 17, 2012 - 7:21pm
The Sixteenth-Century Studies Society and Conference

The work of Spenser, and the idea of him, have inspired poets since the late sixteenth century. His recognized poetic descendants include both the obscure, such as Giles and Phineas Fletcher, and the very great: John Milton, John Keats. But Spenser has not been submissively admired. Generations of poets have been attracted to his creative world – his language, his challenging stanzaic forms, his allegory – but at the same time critical of it: from Philip Sidney's doubts about The Shepheardes Calender to William Hazlitt's dismissal of the allegory in The Faerie Queene, part of the response to Spenser has been vigorous disagreement, or, in Harold Bloom's terms, "misreading". This panel aims to consider Spenser's restless poetic legacy.

[UPDATE]--CFP for "Death and Eros" in Christianity and Literature

updated: 
Saturday, March 17, 2012 - 5:27pm
South Central Modern Language Association--Christianity and Literature Panel

CFP--"Death and Eros"
full name / name of organization:
SCMLA--Christianity and Literature Session
contact email:
Lanta_Davis@baylor.edu

Now accepting abstracts for the SCMLA Christianity and Literature panel. The focus of the SCMLA conference is "Death and Eros," so papers that consider this topic from a Christian perspective will be given preference. However, all topics exploring Christianity and literature will be considered.

Abstracts should be 300 words long and are due by March 29th, 2012.

The SCMLA conference will be held in San Antonio, Texas, from November 8-10 at the historic Sheraton Gunter Hotel on the River Walk.

SAMLA 2012: Beyond the Pleasure Principle?

updated: 
Saturday, March 17, 2012 - 12:47pm
Comparative Literature Division

We are seeking proposals for the Comparative Literature regular session at this year's South Atlantic Modern Language Association meeting in Durham, NC from November 9 to 11.

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Beyond the Pleasure Principle?

As Lionel Trilling once noted, justifying art by the pleasures it gives has fallen into disrepute since the 18th century. Wordsworth already registers this defensive posture in his Lyrical Ballads preface when he asks that the "necessity of producing immediate pleasure [not] be considered as a degradation of the Poet's art," but rather that artists pay "homage … to the grand elementary principle of pleasure, by which [man] knows, and feels, and lives, and moves."

[UPDATE] Brave Words: Literature and Student Veterans (MLA 1/3-1/6/13)--DEADLINE EXTENDED

updated: 
Saturday, March 17, 2012 - 8:45am
2013 Modern Language Association annual convention in Boston, January 3-6, 2013

***DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 3/21/12***

I am seeking 5-7 roundtable participants for a discussion of the various ways veterans in the classroom enrich, challenge, and complicate engagement with classic literary texts, e.g. Heart of Darkness, The Aeneid, The Red Badge of Courage, Whitman's "Drum-Taps," etc. Topics may include text selection, discussion strategies, writing assignments, or managing interactions between veterans and non-veterans. 250-word overviews of proposed discussion topic, along with a 2-page CV, to Liam Corley by March 21, 2012: wccorley@csupomona.edu

UPDATE: Extended Deadline for Edith Wharton Society Research Awards; 3/31

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 6:44pm
Edith Wharton Society

Extended Deadline: Mar. 31, 2012

The Edith Wharton Society announces two research awards for 2012-13:

1. Edith Wharton Collection Research Award

Deadline: March 31, 2012

Each year the Edith Wharton Society offers an Edith Wharton Collection Research Award of $1500 to enable a scholar to conduct research on the Edith Wharton Collection of materials at the Beinecke Library at Yale University.

Prospective fellows for the 2012-2013 award are asked to submit a research proposal (maximum length 5 single-spaced pages) and a CV by the deadline to

Religious Lives: Catholic Culture in the Early Modern World, Friday 18–Saturday 19 May 2012

updated: 
Friday, March 16, 2012 - 5:55pm
St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford

Written, spoken, painted, or performed, the life stories of Catholic men and women – particularly members of religious orders – dominated the culture of early modern Catholicism. This conference will address the growing body of scholarship devoted to understanding biographies and auto-biographies as they appeared in various forms within religious communities and Catholic society at large. These include institutional chronicles, canonization documents, festive decorations,images and pictorial cycles, and musical pieces, in addition to auto/biographical texts and spiritual testimonies – to name only a few.

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