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The New Latina/o Immigrant: Shifts in Literary Perspective (NeMLA 2013, Boston, March 21-24)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 8:44pm
Melissa Bobe / Rutgers University

In light of recent anti-immigrant sentiment and political action, this panel will explore the ways in which racism and xenophobic policy have changed the Latina/o literary output in America. What challenges do Latina/o immigrants, both documented and undocumented, face today? How are these challenges different from those faced by Latina/o immigrants who arrived earlier in the 20th century? How have Latina/o literary voices shifted in the face of these new challenges?

Contact Melissa Bobe, Rutgers University, at apis.melissa@gmail.com. DEADLINE: September 30, 2012.

Topics explored may include (but are not limited to):

Call for Proposals - Edited Collection - Virtual Wildernesses: Ecocritical Explorations of Wildness in Gameworlds (12/18/12)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 7:45pm
Ben S. Bunting, Jr. / Washington State University

Virtual Wildernesses: Ecocritical Explorations of Wildness in Gameworlds

Despite the rapid increase in the popularity of gaming in the last decade, there has been little ecocritical consideration of how virtual worlds fit into the ecosystem that supports our increasingly hybridized experience of reality. Thus, the intent of this collection is to (re)consider the virtual spaces of gameworlds as a new kind of wilderness and players as a new kind of explorer.

Not Just Trout Fishing: Richard Brautigan's Environments

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 1:08pm
ASLE: Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (May 28-June 1)

The work of Counterculture hero Richard Brautigan, long neglected by many critics, is ready for a comeback. I am interested in proposing a session at ASLE's 2013 conference (in Lawrence, KS at the University of Kansas) on nature/ecology/the environment/etc. in Richard Brautigan's work. These terms can be interpreted in a number of ways, but I'm particularly interested in how ecologies relate to interior landscapes or how Brautigan uses politics to talk about nature, or how his character embrace nature as a means of responding to dominate culture, etc. The specific topics are very open, but I do want to start up the conversations surrounding Brautigan again.

37th Annual Philological Association of the Carolinas Conference 21 - 23 March 2013 University of North Carolina at Asheville

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 12:23pm
Philological Association of the Carolinas

Call for Papers and Panels
37th Annual PAC Conference
21 - 23 March 2013
University of North Carolina at Asheville

We welcome papers and panels on any topic of interest to literature and language scholars. Past sessions have focused on English, American, world and multiethnic literatures, as well as on linguistics, composition, and pedagogy.

Email proposals along with a brief abstract and CV by 31 October 2012:

American / British Topics:

Dr. Gary Ettari (gettari@unca.edu)
Associate Professor of Literature and Language
University of North Carolina at Asheville

Foreign / Comparative / Linguistics / Pedagogy Topics:

CFP: Multicultural Perspectives in American Short Fiction (UCA Graduate Conference on Literature, Conway, AR, April 4-5, 2013)

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 12:04pm
University of Central Arkansas, Department of English

We invite papers on any aspect of multiculturalism in American short fiction including novellas, short stories, and poetry. We also welcome submissions on any topic related to all genres of literature, theory, culture, and film, as well as creative submissions of poetry, fiction, and drama.

250-word abstracts or panel proposals must be emailed by March 1, 2013 to ucagradconference1@gmail.com with "Conference Submission" in the subject line.

The American Lyceum: I rise to speak because I am not a slave. Boston: 3-21to24-13

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 11:40am
Northeast Modern Language Association

The title of this panel quotes Abbey Kelly Foster, who without benefit of patrons, sponsors, or the anti-slavery movement, fought her way throughout the American Lyceum circuit of the mid-nineteenth century, speaking in the halls of New England to articulate her perspective on national issues, particularly slavery. While the American Lyceum is known as the precursor to today's community colleges, having featured such great orators as Emerson, Thoreau, Frederick Douglass and Edward Everett, far less is known about the women who contributed to the lyceum. From its inception in 1828 through its decline and disappearance after WWI, the American lyceum forged a public educated through general lectures into a democratic audience.

American Studies Area SW TX PCA ACA Albuquerque, NM Feb. 13-16, 2013

updated: 
Tuesday, August 28, 2012 - 9:13am
Lisa Stein Haven/SW TX PCA ACA

Call for Papers: American Studies Area
34th Annual Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association Conference, "Celebrating Popular/American Culture(s) in a Global Context," February 13-16, 2013
Albuquerque, NM
http://www.swtxpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: November 16, 2012

Conference hotel:
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
300 Tijeras Avenue NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Further conference details are available at http://www.swtxpca.org

[Update] Kalamazoo 2013--Reading Body Language: Digestion, Boundaries, and Community in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Monday, August 27, 2012 - 10:15pm
Danielle Wu, Cornell University

In the Norwich heresy trials, a Lollard named Margery Baxter shocked her interrogators by claiming that, if the Eucharist were the body of Christ, then one could find Christ's body in pieces in all the local privies. In her reply, Baxter shrewdly recognizes that the test of heresy in the interrogators' questioning is a test of the body - whether Baxter takes in the body of Christ as they do and so belongs in their community of like bodies. Baxter's response, by identifying the bodies of her interrogators and their community as foul, turns around their attempts to define and expel her from the body of the Church.

Reading Body Language: Digestion, Boundaries, and Community in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Monday, August 27, 2012 - 10:12pm
Danielle Wu, Cornell University

In the Norwich heresy trials, a Lollard named Margery Baxter shocked her interrogators by claiming that, if the Eucharist were the body of Christ, then one could find Christ's body in pieces in all the local privies. In her reply, Baxter shrewdly recognizes that the test of heresy in the interrogators' questioning is a test of the body - whether Baxter takes in the body of Christ as they do and so belongs in their community of like bodies. Baxter's response, by identifying the bodies of her interrogators and their community as foul, turns around their attempts to define and expel her from the body of the Church.

CFP for Area, Arab Culture in the U.S. (Albuquerque, NM, Feb. 13-16, 2013)

updated: 
Monday, August 27, 2012 - 9:21pm
Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Associations

CALL FOR PAPERS

for the Area, Arab Culture in the U.S., at
the 34th Annual Conference of the

Southwest/Texas Popular Culture & American Culture Associations
February 13-16, 2013
Albuquerque, New Mexico
http://www.swtxpca.org

Conference Theme
Celebrating Popular/ American Culture(s) in a Global Context

Deadline for Proposal Submission: November 16, 2012
Deadline for Early Bird Registration: December 31, 2012

Pastoral for the 21st Century (ASLE 2013, May 28-June 1, Lawrence, Kansas)

updated: 
Monday, August 27, 2012 - 8:21pm
T.J. Welch, Florida State University

Seeking abstracts for a pre-formed panel to be proposed for the ASLE Biennial Conference May 28th-June 1 at the University of Kansas in Lawrence, Kansas.

This panel will explore the pastoral mode as a viable form of eco-critique for the 21st century. Proposals from all disciplines and perspectives are welcome. Works analyzed may be from any time period and any genre.

Subjects and methods may include, but aren't limited to:

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