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English Revenge Tragedies, RSA Conference, Venice, April 8-10, 2010 (Deadline: May 15th, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 14, 2009 - 11:58am
Emily King, Tufts University

Though revenge tragedies preoccupied Elizabethan and Jacobean spectators, these plays received little to no critical recognition. Even today, revenge tragedies comprise a seemingly marginalized sector of Renaissance drama. Observing their current status, Stevie Simkin quips in Revenge Tragedy: "Consequently, they are (with some reluctance) permitted to join the established canon of classical works, occasionally dragged out like exotic creatures for a season to be observed by curious audiences and often patronizing theatre critics, and then locked securely away for another ten years" (4). Furthermore, these works – as a genre – have garnered a remarkably small amount of scholarly attention, particularly in the past ten years.

CFP: Manufacturing Happiness Conference 9/19/09 (deadline 6/15/09)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 14, 2009 - 1:09am
Dava L. Simpson/George Mason University

CALL FOR PAPERS
Manufacturing Happiness: Investigating Subjectivity, Transformation, and Cultural Capital

The Graduate Students of George Mason University invite paper proposals for our 4th Annual Cultural Studies Conference. The Conference will take place on Saturday, September 19, 2009 at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

[UPDATE] Special Issue: Steampunk, Science, and (Neo)Victorian Technologies

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 4:07pm
Rachel Bowser and Brian Croxall / Neo-Victorian Studies

Neo-Victorian Studies invites papers and/or abstracts for a 2009 special issue on neo-Victorianism's engagement with science and new/old technologies, especially as articulated through the genre of Steampunk. As a lifestyle, aesthetic and literary movement, Steampunk can be both the act of modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artefact and an act of (re-)imagining a London in which Charles Babbage's analytical engine was realised. Steampunk includes applications of nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; speculative extensions of technologies that actually existed; and the anachronistic importation of contemporary science into fictionalised pasts and projected futures.

CFP: Migration, Diaspora and Identity: M/MLA Religion and Literature, Deadline Apr. 30

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 3:52pm
Midwest Modern Language Association Religion and Literature section

Religion and Literature: "Migration, Diaspora, and Identity." In the self-identity of many religious groups, the historical experience of diaspora is an important theme. War, persecution and famine have driven groups across every continent in search of peace, freedom and homeland. How does the ancestral memory of diaspora color the self-identity and story of a contemporary people? How do the themes of chosenness, promise and homeland affect a people's current story about themselves, in both individual and group tellings? Where do the descendants of diaspora belong? Send 250-word proposals by April 30 to Bobbi Dykema Katsanis, Graduate Theological Union, rdykema@ses.gtu.edu. M/MLA 2009 Convention Nov.

Early Modern Women Writers and Genre, RSA Conference, Venice, April 8-10, 2010

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 3:39pm
Martine Van Elk

This panel explores the choices early modern women writers made among literary forms. How do women's artistic choices respond to and seek to change the cultural climate in which they worked? How did the book market and manuscript circulation relate to female artistic output? How did literary contacts and influence affect women's generic choices? And once women decided to work within specific genres, how did they transform those genres? How does work in literary genres relate to other female artistic output such as painting, embroidery, paper cutting, and glass engraving?

Interdisciplinary and cross-cultural approaches are welcome.

[UPDATE] CFP: Modern Magazines panel; Modernist Studies Association Conference, November 5-8, 2009, Montréal, Canada

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 2:51pm
Christopher Reed / Pennsylvania State University

MODERN MAGAZINES:

To mark the inauguration of the new biannual Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, this MSA Conference panel calls for papers presenting new work on modern magazines. Papers are encouraged to address the relationship between or among various forms of modernism in magazines ranging from approximately 1885 to 1950. Examples might include the relationship between textual and visual languages of modernism, and/or between magazines as a modern mass-mediated genre and new forms of social identity structured around gender, professional status, or class.

Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV by 1 May to Christopher Reed, Penn State University (creed@psu.edu)

Deconstruction and Environmentalism: Oxford Literary Review, vol. 31.1 (July 2010),

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 2:30pm
Timothy Clark, co-editor, Oxford Literary Review

Oxford Literary Review, vol. 31.1 (July 2010), call for papers.

Deconstruction and Environmentalism

"Global warming ... is...traumatic ... in attacking the fundamental premises on which are based our capacity to understand or adequately respond" (David Wood, "On Being Haunted by the Future")

"the ecological facts of life threaten to challenge our most dearly held political values: justice, freedom, and democracy." (Bob Pepperman Taylor 'Environmental Ethics and Political Theory')

"The plain fact is that the planet does not need more successful people" (David W. Orr, Earth in Mind: On Education, Environment, and the Human Prospect)

MSA11: Modernism and the Commodity Fetish (panel proposal)

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 1:55pm
Modernist Studies Association

In Capital: Volume One, Karl Marx writes that the commodity fetish develops when we "bring the products of our labour into relation with each other as values." In the process, we convert "every product into a social hieroglyphic. Later on, we try to decipher the hieroglyphic, to get behind the secret of our own social products; for to stamp an object of utility as a value, is just as much a social product as language." In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, as disintegrating social structures allowed for new understandings of class-based identities, the hieroglyphic messages of commodities contribute to the construction of systems of social value.

Cultures of Recession Graduate Conference [Nov. 20& 21, 2009]

updated: 
Monday, April 13, 2009 - 10:17am
Program in Literature, Duke University


Cultures of Recession
An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference Hosted by The Program in Literature, Duke University
November 20 & 21, 2009

Keynote Speaker: Stanley Aronowitz (CUNY), author of How Class Works and Just Around The Corner: The Paradox of a Jobless Recovery

"Multiple Perspectives On Collecting and the Collection" (Journal Issue, deadline 6/30/2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 10:19pm
María M. Andrade, Universidad de los Andes. Francisco Morán, Southern Methodist University

Collections and collecting occupy an important place in the development of modern culture, both at the personal and communal level. "Who collects?", "what does s/he collect?", "why does s/he do it?", and "what meanings are assigned to the act of collecting?" are questions which have significant implications for the construction of individual and communal identities, and in which the fields of aesthetics, ethics, politics, and erotics inter-cross. The next number of the journal "La Habana elegante" will include a special dossier with reflections on the topic of collecting, and it invites authors from the fields of literature, history, cultural studies, and other areas to send essays for their review, before the deadline of June 30, 2009.

FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON FILM THEORY AND ANALYSIS (IN MEXICO)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 8:57pm
Sepancine/Mexican Society of Film Theory and Analysis

An international conference on film theory and analysis held in Morelia, Mexico from October 1-3 in tandem with the Morelia International Film Festival.

Keynote: Robert Stam, New York University
"The Theory and Practice of Film Adaptation"

Where: The city of Morelia, in the state of Michoacán, Mexico

When: Thursday, October 1 to Saturday, October 3, 2009, in tandem with the 7th edition of the Morelia International Film Festival

Presented by: Sepancine/Mexican Society of Film Theory and Analysis, the Working Group "Expression and Representation" of the Metropolitan Autonomous University-Cuajimalpa (UAM-C), and the Morelia International Film Festival (FICM)

CFP: Power and Social Control in Contemp. Lit/Film (5/21; SAMLA 11/6-11/8)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 7:47pm
Carol Osborne/College English Association Panel at SAMLA

For the College English Association's session at SAMLA, we are seeking papers exploring the power dynamic that exists between those in authority and those who are subjected to their rule, as represented in contemporary works of literature and/or film. By May 21, 2009, please submit abstracts of no more than 250 words to Carol Osborne, Coastal Carolina University, at osborne@coastal.edu. All presenters must be members of both CEA and the South Atlantic Modern Language Association at the time of the conference, which will be held November 6-8 in Atlanta, Georgia.

This is Nowhere: Local, Regional and Provincial Spaces in World Literature - 24 October 2009 (Deadline: June 1st 2009)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 5:33pm
UC Berkeley, Graduate Program in Comparative Literature

For all their complexity, recent discussions of cosmopolitanism, comparativism, and world literature have tended to privilege the global over the local, the macro over the micro, and the city over the country. These discussions have prompted us to ask some of the following questions: what constitutes a small town, region, province, village, settlement, or other small-scale community? How have these and other terms historically been used by the cultural centers from which most discourse is generated? What does it mean to speak or write from a local or regional community within the context of the world republic of letters? How is this related to or different from writing for a small-scale community?

European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 15 Matter and Material Culture 2011

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 2:50am
Università degli studi della Calabria; Università degli studi di Salerno; Routledge

European Journal of English Studies, Vol. 15
Matter and Material Culture
Deadline for proposals: 13 November 2009

Guest Editors: Maurizio Calbi & Marilena Parlati.

Cultural materialism has been adding much to our knowledge and understanding of the ways in which culture is informed by and conformed to and with matter, and so have the numerous analyses and histories of material culture from fields as varied as sociology, anthropology, museum studies, consumer studies, and so forth.

[UPDATE] CFP: Medieval TV Collection (proposals by 7/15/09)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 12:09am
The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

Updated CFP: Medieval TV Collection (proposals by 7/15/09)
ESSAYS ARE STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FOLLOWING:

GETTING MEDIEVAL ON TV: TELEVISUAL REPRESENTATIONS OF MEDIEVAL THEMES FROM ROAR TO THE TUDORS
ORGANIZED BY THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
PROPOSALS BY 7/15/09

[UPDATE] CFP: Beowulf on Film/TV/Electronic Games Collection (proposals by 12/15/09)

updated: 
Sunday, April 12, 2009 - 12:07am
The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages

Updated CFP: Beowulf on Film/TV/Electronic Games Collection (proposals by 12/15/09)
ESSAYS ARE STILL BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FOLLOWING:

REEL WORLDS OF BEOWULF: REPRESENTATIONS OF BEOWULFIANA ON ELECTRONIC MULTIMEDIA
ORGANIZED BY THE SOCIETY FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE AND THE MIDDLE AGES
PROPOSALS BY 12/15/09

The Literary Menagerie

updated: 
Saturday, April 11, 2009 - 7:05pm
Jeanne Dubino and Ziba Rashidian

You are invited to contribute to an edited volume entitled "The Literary Menagerie." The last decade has seen an intensive scholarly engagement with the question of the human-non-human animal relation, including its artistic and literary representation. This foundational scholarship has made it possible to pursue more focused areas of inquiry. One such area is suggested by Randy Malamud in his "Becoming Animal": "art has the potential to present a valuable . . . account of what it is like to be a different animal from ourselves" (7). Art makes it possible for us to imagine ourselves into another being and also to discover other ways of being human.

CFP: Modern Magazines

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:38pm
Christopher G. Reed / Pennsylvania State University

To mark the inauguration of the new biannual Journal of Modern Periodical Studies, this panel calls for papers presenting new work on modern magazines. Papers are encouraged to address the relationship between or among various forms of modernism in magazines ranging from approximately 1885 to 1950. Examples might include the relationship between textual and visual languages of modernism, and/or between magazines as a modern mass-mediated genre and new forms of social identity structured around gender, professional status, or class.
Please send a 300 word abstract and a brief CV by 1 May to Christopher Reed, Penn State University (creed@psu.edu)

Remixing Critical Theory: Literacy Theory as Literary Criticism; 4Cs / CCCC 2010 Panel; 4/22

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 3:20pm
Nicole duPlessis / Texas A&M University

Eldred and Mortensen, in their article "Reading Literacy Narratives" published in College English (1992), call for the movement of literacy studies "in one important direction: into the study of literary texts" (512). Toward this goal, the article identifies categories of literacy-centered literary texts: the "literacy myth," "narratives of socialization," "literature of the contact zone," and "literacy narratives" (Eldred and Mortensen 512-513). However, to date, this article has failed to make a significant impact on literary criticism.

[UPDATE] The Spatial Significance of Native American Stories and Ideology - contributors sought

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 2:44pm
Catherine Rainwater, Cristine Soliz, Anna Lee Walters

We are now accepting submissions for a collection of stories, essays, and poems for a proposed book on comparative American spatial concepts, partially titled "Stories the Land Holds." The editors are looking for texts variously addressing "stories in the land." What are the stories the land tells? Vine Deloria has warned us of problems that result from a perspective that is not fundamentally spatial, and such has been the case for current problems that range from ecological disaster to fanatical environmentalism and bundled mortgages. We believe that these complex and problematic American events can be understood more fully from a Native American perspective.

Women Readers/Educational Texts 1500-1800

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 1:58pm
Dr Pollie Bromilow University of Liverpool

First Call for Papers

Women Readers/Educational Texts 1500-1800

A three-day international conference at the University of Liverpool
April 14th-16th 2010

CFP: Gender, Sport, and the Olympics (deadline: May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Friday, April 10, 2009 - 10:53am
thirdspace: a journal of feminist theory and culture

CFP: Gender, Sport, and the Olympics (deadline: May 15, 2009)

The editors of /thirdspace: a journal of feminist theory and culture/ invite submissions for our forthcoming issue on gender, sport, and the Olympics.

Prompted by the upcoming 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, we are interested in exploring the central role which gender and sexuality play in shaping ideas about athleticism, sport culture, and the body, and the significant ways in which athletic events such as the Olympics work to transform conceptions of public space, national boundaries and identities, and gendered self-presentations and performances. This issue invites contributions on:

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