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CFP: [General] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:51am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Ethnic] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:50am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Gender Studies] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:50am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Religion] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:49am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [General] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:49am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [American] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:49am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Science] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:48am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:47am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Theatre] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:47am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Theory] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:47am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Science] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:46am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [18th] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:45am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Renaissance] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:45am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [Medieval] Rhetorics of Plague: Early / Modern Trajectories of Biohazard

updated: 
Friday, October 24, 2008 - 12:44am
Helene Scheck

The threat of biological catastropheâ€"including that by AIDS, ebola, irreversible global warming,
avian influenza, and species extinctionâ€"may seem the specific and daunting provenance of late
20th- and early 21st â€"century life, but it has in fact been a crucial part of history since ancient
times. It is important to remember, for instance, that starting in the 14th century and extending
well into the 18th, the bubonic plague (as the Black Death) ultimately took the lives of at least
35% of the entire population in Europe, as well as nearly that much in central Asia, killing an
estimated total of 75 million people. Given these numbers, it could be argued that premodern

CFP: [20th] Contemporary/20th Century Scottish Literature

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 10:01pm
M. Claire Pamplin

New Jersey College English Association
2009 Annual Conference
Seton Hall University
Saturday, March 21, 2009

Contemporary/20th Century Scottish Literature: Which texts and
assignments work best in American college classrooms? How viable is the
category of Scottish literature? Now that Scotland has an elected
political authority, what has changed, if anything, for Scottish writers
regarding representation of the nation? Papers on these themes or any
aspect of contemporary Scottish literature, including nation and
nationalism, postcolonialism, language, gender, class, and others are
welcome.

UPDATE: [General] health and disease in culture

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 5:53pm
jennifer tebbe-grossman

PCA/ACA AREA: Medical Humanities: Health and Disease in Culture
POPULAR CULTURE AND AMERICAN CULTURE ASSOCIATIONS
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
New Orleans Marriott
New Orleans, Louisiana
April 8-April 11, 2009

UPDATE: [International] Re-presenting Comics: Transgressions in Media and Culture

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 5:36pm
Gokul t.G. cpracsis.org

Of lately the study of Comics(Comic strips, Cartoons and Graphic Novels)
once relegated to the realm of 'Low Art" have been attracting a lot of
attention from academia all over the world with their production,
dissemination and reception being considered as valid and as major forms
of cultural exchange and signifying processes. C PRACSIS (Centre for
performance research and cultural studies in South Asia) Invites from
researchers, academicians and practitioners of the art, papers that
examine Comics, Cartoons and Graphic Novels (but not restricted to) as
cultural and social signifiers, the conditions of its production,
distribution and reception, status of the Comic artist, Comics and its

CFP: [General] Literary London Conference 2009 (UK; 3/27/09; 7/9-10/09)

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 4:15pm
Dr Lawrence Phillips

Literary London 2009
Representations of London in Literature An Interdisciplinary Conference

Web site: www.literarylondon.org

Hosted by the School of English and Drama, Queen Mary, University of
London UK

Organised by the University of Northampton, Kingston University, and
Queen Mary, University of London

9-10th July 2009

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS & CREATIVE WRITERS
Rachel Lichtenstein, author of On Brick Lane and Rodinsky’s Room
Professor Scott McCracken (Keele, English)
Professor Miles Ogborn (QMUL, Geography)

Proposals by 27th March 2009

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] Call for papers

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 2:11pm
Olivette Otele

International Conference
University Paris XIII, France
Identity Politics and Minorities in the English-speaking World and France:
Rhetoric and Reality

26-27 March 2009

Call for papers

CFP: [Collections] Anthony Burgess and SF

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 11:15am
Rob Spence

Gylphi, the new publisher for 20th and 21st century cultural studies, invites contributions for a
new volume- Within academic spheres an uneasy silence has reigned over Anthony Burgess the
Science Fiction writer. There may well be a number of reasons for this, for example the
dismissive way that Burgess wrote about sf inThe End of the World News; his fondness for the
argument that Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-four was not about the future at all but about 1948, the
year in which it was written; and/or the surreal Kantian joke which is ‘The Muse: A Sort of SF
Story’. It may also have much to do with the way Burgess is known as a science fiction or

CFP: [Victorian] Hugh MacColl Centenary Conference

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 7:25am
Amirouche Moktefi

(First) Call for Papers

Institut d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences et des Techniques
(Paris)
Unité Savoirs, Textes, Language (Lille)
Laboratoire d’Histoire des Sciences et de Philosophie â€" Archives
Poincaré (Nancy)

Organise

The Hugh MacColl Centenary Conference

Boulogne sur Mer, 9-10 October 2009

CFP: [International] international alan paton conference

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 6:53am
David Levey

                                                                          
         

THE ALAN PATON CENTRE 20TH ANNIVERSARY CONFERENCE

THIRD CALL FOR PAPERS
DEADLINE: 30 January 2009

The Alan Paton Centre & Struggle Archives at the University of KwaZulu-
Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, is holding an international
conference as part of the celebrations of its twentieth anniversary.

Title: The Alan Paton Centre 20th Anniversary Conference

Theme: Alan Paton and his life and work and topics related to the
collections of the Alan Paton Centre

Keynote speaker: Professor Peter Alexander, of the University of New
South Wales, who will also deliver the Alan Paton Lecture

CFP: [International] Media Studies

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 6:01am
Vijayasree Chaganti

                                                          
Osmania University Centre for International Programs
International Conference on Media, Culture and Ideology
29-31 January, 2009

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] Pacific NW American Studies Assn Conference April 16-18, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 3:33am
Brian Donahue

Proposals for individual papers or full panel presentations are now being accepted for the annual
PNASA conference, April 16-18, 2009, at the Inn at Spanish Head in Lincoln City, Oregon.
Papers on topics related to the conference theme, "Northwest Stories and Histories," are
especially encouraged. Proposals on other topics in American studies are also welcome.

In order to be considered for inclusion in the conference program, please submit an abstract of
around 250 words by January 16, 2009, via e-mail to Brian Donahue, PNASA president.

Please include along with your abstract submission the following information:

CFP: [American] Pacific NW American Studies Assn Conference April 16-18, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, October 23, 2008 - 3:30am
Brian Donahue

Proposals for individual papers or full panel presentations are now being accepted for the annual
PNASA conference, April 16-18, 2009, at the Inn at Spanish Head in Lincoln City, Oregon.
Papers on topics related to the conference theme, "Northwest Stories and Histories," are
especially encouraged. Proposals on other topics in American studies are also welcome.

In order to be considered for inclusion in the conference program, please submit an abstract of
around 250 words by January 16, 2009, via e-mail to Dr. Brian Donahue, PNASA president.

Please include along with your abstract submission the following information:

CFP: [International] International Comics Conference, cpracsis.org. Kerala, India.

updated: 
Wednesday, October 22, 2008 - 6:33pm
Gokul cpracsis.org

International Comics Conference, cpracsis.org. Kerala, India.
Re-presenting Comics: Transgressions in Media and Culture
Of lately the study of Comics(Comic strips, Cartoons and Graphic Novels)
once relegated to the realm of 'Low Art" have been attracting a lot of
attention from academia all over the world with their production,
dissemination and reception being considered as valid and as major forms
of cultural exchange and signifying processes. C PRACSIS (Centre for
performance research and cultural studies in South Asia) Invites from
researchers, academicians and practitioners of the art, papers that
examine Comics, Cartoons and Graphic Novels (but not restricted to) as

CFP: [Renaissance] 2009 Conference on John Milton, MTSU, Murfreesboro

updated: 
Wednesday, October 22, 2008 - 5:36pm
Kevin Donovan

The 2009 Conference on John Milton: October 15-17, 2009.
Sponsored by the Department of English, Middle Tennessee State University,
Murfreesboro, Tennessee.

Papers (not to exceed 20 minutes reading time) are invited on any aspect of
Milton Studies, from close readings of particular works to broader
investigations of themes and trends.

Send two copies of completed papers by June 30, 2009 to Charles W. Durham,
2318 London Avenue, Murfreesboro, TN 37129.

Featured speakers on the program include Achsah Guibbory (Barnard College)
and William Shullenberger (Sarah Lawrence College)

For more information, call, write, or email the conference directors:

CFP: [American] Emily Dickinson International Society Panels at American Literature Association

updated: 
Wednesday, October 22, 2008 - 4:04pm
Stephanie A. Tingley

EDIS will again sponsor two panels at the 2009 American Literature
Association conference, held this year in Boston, MA May 21-24, 2009.

Please send proposals and abstracts by email to both Ellen Louise Hart
(ehart_at_ucsc.edu) and Stephanie Tingley (satingley_at_ysu.edu). Deadline for
submissions: January 9, 2009.

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