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Aliases and Editors: Negotiating Identity in 19th Century Periodicals (Panel), March 2012

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2011 - 12:00pm
full name / name of organization: 
NeMLA Annual Convention - Rochester, New York
contact email: 

The following CFP is for a panel taking place at the Annual Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention in Rochester, New York on March 12-15, 2012.

The periodical writer often depended upon establishing a distinguishable identity to achieve his/her popularity. Yet some of the most successful examples were pseudonymous figures like Charles Lamb's Elia and James Hogg's Ettrick Shepherd. Such figures often played fast and loose with notions of stable identity, altering and contradicting their fictional backstories with each month's contribution. Operating through such mercurial personas, these writers utilized the market's potential for fluctuating identity described by Lynch.

Transnational, Global, and/or World Literatures? Charting the Integration of Comparative Praxis in the Humanities; 3/15-18/2012

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2011 - 11:28am
full name / name of organization: 
Katie Yankura, Michael Swacha

What is meant by the term "transnational literature," and how, if at all, would we characterize it as distinct from or interchangeable with the term "world literature?" What pedagogical and institutional concerns are at stake in these terms? This roundtable aims to foster a meta-conversation concerning the recent turn in the humanities towards "transnational," "world," and "global" approaches. Such issues have gathered attention in recent years as literature programs seek alternate modes of critical practice in a globalizing world, as language programs face institutional consolidation, and as the humanities in general attempt to chart new ground in order to remain "relevant" in a shifting academic climate.

"James J. Paxson Memorial Sessions," 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2012

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2011 - 11:21am
full name / name of organization: 
International Congress on Medieval Studies

Please share the following Call For Papers with interested colleagues:

Three sessions will honor Professor James J. Paxson at the 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies, University of Western Michigan, Kalamazoo, MI, May 10-13, 2012.

A Brand of Fictional Magic: Imaginative Empathy in Harry Potter, 17-18 May 2012

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2011 - 6:43am
full name / name of organization: 
School of English, University of St Andrews
contact email: 

Call for Papers (Deadline: 15 November 2011):
A Brand of Fictional Magic: Imaginative Empathy in Harry Potter

A two day conference hosted by
the School of English, University of St Andrews
17-18 May 2012, Kennedy Hall, St Andrews, Scotland

The relentless success of J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter series (1997-2007) evokes words like 'phenomenon' and 'catastrophe'. With the conclusion of the film franchise and the launch of Pottermore.com, the series is receiving increased academic consideration in conferences, articles, and monographs. However, relatively little work has been done directly engaging with the series as a literary text. This conference attempts to begin redressing that lack.

Orbit: Writing Around Pynchon

updated: 
Monday, July 11, 2011 - 6:06am
full name / name of organization: 
Martin Paul Eve, University of Sussex
contact email: 

Orbit: Writing Around Pynchon, a new Open Access, peer reviewed e-journal of scholarly work pertaining to the writings of Thomas Pynchon and adjacent fields, seeks articles, reviews and letters for publication.

Thomas Pynchon is an American writer of novels, short stories and occasional journalistic pieces whose influence upon the contemporary American writing scene is virtually unparalleled, leading Harold Bloom, in recent correspondence, to write: "certainly he is still the most important writer alive". Topics for consideration could include, but are by no means limited to:

Alfred Hitchcock - Albuquerque, New Mexico February 8-11, 2012

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 10:11pm
full name / name of organization: 
Southwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association - 33rd Annual Conference
contact email: 

Call for Papers: Alfred Hitchcock

Southwest Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association
33rd Annual Conference
Albuquerque, New Mexico
February 8-11, 2012
Hyatt Regency Hotel and Conference Center
330 Tijeras Ave. NW
Albuquerque, New Mexico 87102 USA
Phone: 1-505-842-1234
Submission Deadline: December 1st, 2011

Conference Website: (updated regularly)

Panels now forming for presentations on the films and career of Alfred Hitchcock. Listed below are some suggestions for possible presentations.

UPDATE: Performing South Asia at Home and Abroad

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 9:17pm
full name / name of organization: 
South Asian Literary Association (SALA)

PERFORMING SOUTH ASIA AT HOME AND ABROAD

South Asian Literary Association (SALA), Seattle 2012

Keynote Guests: Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak and Charles Johnson

Date: Wed., January 4, 2012 at 9:00am – Thurs., January 5, 2012 at 5:00pm

Venue: Hyatt Place Downtown, 110 6th Avenue North (at Denny Way)

Update on 'Poetic Optimism ...': The new deadline is 15 August 2011

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 4:55pm
full name / name of organization: 
Dr Maryam Farahani-Dr Nick Davis
contact email: 

We are developing a collection of articles for a special issue journal of Studies in the Literary Imagination entitled 'Poetic Optimism and the Post-Enlightenment Social Identity, 1794-1878'. This collection will explore the meaning and application of poetic optimism in relation to the question of social identity from 1794 to 1878.

A Conference in Honor of Barbara Hodgdon (Abstract Submission Deadline August 30, 2011)

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 1:22pm
full name / name of organization: 
Early Modern Colloquium at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

A Conference in Honor of Barbara Hodgdon (Abstract Submission Deadline August 30, 2011)
Held by the Early Modern Colloquium
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
October 15, 2011

Keynote speaker: Peter Holland (University of Notre Dame)

Reading Love and Violence in VIctorian Literature

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 11:55am
full name / name of organization: 
Robert E. Lougy, Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel will explore the dynamics of love and violence in the British literature of the Victorian period, examining the question of why this fascination, why the rich and frequent presence of these sites of violence and love in an age that extolled the virtues of restraint, moderation, control. What can such an inquiry tell us about the age, its artists, and their audience? Submit a 250 word abstract by September 30, 2011. Robert E. Lougy, The Pennsylvania State University

Reading Love and Violence in Victorian Literatdure

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 11:49am
full name / name of organization: 
Robert E. Lougy, Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

This panel will explore the dynamics of love and violence in the British literature of the Victorian period, examining the question of why this fascination, why the rich and frequent presence of these sites of violence and love in an age that extolled the virtues of restraint, moderation, control. What can such an inquiry tell us about the age, its artists, and their audience? Robert E. Lougy, The Pennsylvania State University
Chair: Robert Lougy

Desiring Statues: Statuary, Sexuality and History Conference, 27 April 2012

updated: 
Sunday, July 10, 2011 - 4:44am
full name / name of organization: 
University of Exeter
contact email: 

Desiring Statues: Statuary, Sexuality and History Conference

University of Exeter, 27th April 2012

Keynote Speakers:

Stefano-Maria Evangelista (University of Oxford)
Ian Jenkins (British Museum)

Statuary has offered a privileged site for the articulation of sexual experience and ideas, and the formation of sexual knowledge. From prehistoric phallic stones, mythological representations of statues and sculptors, e.g. Medusa or Pygmalion, to the Romantic aesthetics and erotics of statuary and the recurrent references to sculpture in nineteenth- and twentieth-century sexology and other new debates on sexuality, the discourse of the statue intersects with constructions of gender, sex and sexuality in multiple ways.

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