all recent posts

CFP: [Professional] CCCCs Panel: Revisiting the Bartholomae/Elbow "Debate"

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 3:06pm
Ellen C. Carillo

Recently, in an effort to “reawaken the discussion of voice” in the
teaching of composition, Peter Elbow argued that we should “learn to
adopt contrary stances toward voiceâ€"reading texts through the lens of
voice and also reading them through the lens of ‘text’ or not-voice”
(“Reconsiderations: Voice in Writing Again: Embracing Contraries,”
College English, November 2007). Elbow contends that in taking this
approach not only in discussions of voice but in our scholarship more
generally, we will “be wiser in our scholarly thinking and writing” and
will be “released from dead-end critical arguments that are framed by the

CFP: [Rhetoric-Composition] CCCC Panel: Revisiting the Bartholomae/Elbow "Debate"

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 3:04pm
Ellen C. Carillo

Recently, in an effort to “reawaken the discussion of voice” in the
teaching of composition, Peter Elbow argued that we should “learn to
adopt contrary stances toward voiceâ€"reading texts through the lens of
voice and also reading them through the lens of ‘text’ or not-voice”
(“Reconsiderations: Voice in Writing Again: Embracing Contraries,”
College English, November 2007). Elbow contends that in taking this
approach not only in discussions of voice but in our scholarship more
generally, we will “be wiser in our scholarly thinking and writing” and
will be “released from dead-end critical arguments that are framed by the

CFP: [General] CFP: NeMLA Session Proposals (5/10/08; 2/26-3/1/09)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 2:46pm
Elizabeth

Northeast Modern Language Association

2009 Annual Convention

Boston, Massachusetts February 26 - March 1, 2009

Celebrating 40 years!

A regional MLA, NeMLA offers a vibrant yet more intimate conference
experience. The 2008 Convention in Buffalo features more than 230 panels,
covering all aspects of scholarship and teaching in the modern languages
and literatures. Please join us to mark NeMLA's 40 years of modern
language scholarship.

NeMLA is a member-driven convention, accepting session proposals (panel,
roundtable, creative session, seminar) in the following areas:

CFP: [20th] the masculine middlebrow reader, 1880-1950

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 2:19pm
Kate Macdonald

CALL FOR PAPERS

What Did Mr Miniver Read?
The Fears and Aspirations of the "Masculine Middlebrow" Writer, 1880-1950

A two-day conference hosted by the Institute of English Studies

13-14 March 2009

UPDATE: [Computing-Internet] Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 5:41am
Katherine Bode

Call for Papers

Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary
Culture Symposium

Sponsored by Australian literature @ the University of Sydney and AustLit.

4-5 December 2008
The University of Sydney
        
On 4-5 December 2008, Australian Literature @ the University of Sydney will
host a symposium on Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and
Australian Literary Culture. Plenary speakers include digital humanities
specialist Professor Hugh Craig (University of Newcastle) and Professor
David Carter (University of Queensland).

UPDATE: [International] Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 5:41am
Katherine Bode

Call for Papers

Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary
Culture Symposium

Sponsored by Australian literature @ the University of Sydney and AustLit.

4-5 December 2008
The University of Sydney
        
On 4-5 December 2008, Australian Literature @ the University of Sydney will
host a symposium on Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and
Australian Literary Culture. Plenary speakers include digital humanities
specialist Professor Hugh Craig (University of Newcastle) and Professor
David Carter (University of Queensland).

UPDATE: [General] Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 5:41am
Katherine Bode

Call for Papers

Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and Australian Literary
Culture Symposium

Sponsored by Australian literature @ the University of Sydney and AustLit.

4-5 December 2008
The University of Sydney
        
On 4-5 December 2008, Australian Literature @ the University of Sydney will
host a symposium on Resourceful Reading: The New Empiricism, eResearch and
Australian Literary Culture. Plenary speakers include digital humanities
specialist Professor Hugh Craig (University of Newcastle) and Professor
David Carter (University of Queensland).

CFP: [International] Critical Thoughts: the purpose of higher education

updated: 
Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 3:52am
Dr Tim McKenzie

Critical Thoughts: Recovering Higher Education

What is the vocation of the university in the twenty-first century? In an
era of departmental closures, performance based research funding and
strategic management, the primary purpose of universities and the core
values sustaining that purpose are often far from obvious. At this
juncture, Newman’s vision of the University as a School of Universal
Learning seems a distant memory rather than a future target.

CFP: [General] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:24pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [Science] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:24pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:23pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [American] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:23pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [20th] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:23pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [Victorian] SLSA 2008 panel: Steampunk and Reiteration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 6:23pm
Brian Croxall

As a lifestyle and a literary movement, steampunk can be both the act of
modding your laptop to look like and function as a Victorian artifact and
an act of imagining what London might have looked like had Charles
Babbage’s analytical engine been realized. Steampunk is the application of
nineteenth-century aesthetics to contemporary objects; it is the
speculative extension of technologies that actually existed; it is the
anachronistic importation of contemporary technologies into the
fictionalized past. In all cases, steampunk blurs boundaries: between
centuries, between technologies, and between origin and repetition.

CFP: [International] Rouen-Québec, four centuries of relationship: history and narration

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 5:08pm
Cecile Fouache

International Conference/Colloque international

" Rouen-Québec, four centuries of relationship: history and narration "/
" Quatre siècles de relations Rouen-Québec : de l’événement au récit "

Université de Rouen, IPEC
November 13-14, 2008/13-14 novembre 2008

Call for Papers/Appel à Communications

La version française suit.

UPDATE: [General] Professional Studies Review

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 4:18pm
Joseph Marotta

The deadline for submitting articles to the current issue of Professional
Studies Review (journal) has been extended from April 15, 2008 to May 15, 2008.

For this issue the Review will consider articles on any topic of general
interest to those working within career-oriented fields. Specific
possibilities might include (but are not limited to) such issues as:

CFP: [Ethnic] To Kill a Mocking Bird

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 3:07pm
Jon Mitchell

Proposals are sought for an edited collection of essays on Harper Lee's
novel "To Kill a Mocking Bird"

This influencial novel, though taught in many institutions, has received
very little critical attention.

This collection hopes to remedy this by collecting together essays that
explore the novel from a number of diverse perspectives.

Please send proposals to:

Dr Jon Mitchell
School of English, Media, and Theatre Studies
National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Co.Kildare
Ireland

jon.mitchell_at_nuim.ie

CFP: [Gender Studies] To Kill a Mocking Bird

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 3:06pm
Jon Mitchell

Proposals are sought for an edited collection of essays on Harper Lee's
novel "To Kill a Mocking Bird"

This influencial novel, though taught in many institutions, has received
very little critical attention.

This collection hopes to remedy this by collecting together essays that
explore the novel from a number of diverse perspectives.

Please send proposals to:

Dr Jon Mitchell
School of English, Media, and Theatre Studies
National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Co.Kildare
Ireland

jon.mitchell_at_nuim.ie

CFP: [American] To Kill a Mocking Bird

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 3:06pm
Jon Mitchell

Proposals are sought for an edited collection of essays on Harper Lee's
novel "To Kill a Mocking Bird"

This influencial novel, though taught in many institutions, has received
very little critical attention.

This collection hopes to remedy this by collecting together essays that
explore the novel from a number of diverse perspectives.

Please send proposals to:

Dr Jon Mitchell
School of English, Media, and Theatre Studies
National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Co.Kildare
Ireland

jon.mitchell_at_nuim.ie

CFP: [Cultural-Historical] To Kill a Mocking Bird

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 3:06pm
Jon Mitchell

Proposals are sought for an edited collection of essays on Harper Lee's
novel "To Kill a Mocking Bird"

This influencial novel, though taught in many institutions, has received
very little critical attention.

This collection hopes to remedy this by collecting together essays that
explore the novel from a number of diverse perspectives.

Please send proposals to:

Dr Jon Mitchell
School of English, Media, and Theatre Studies
National University of Ireland, Maynooth
Co.Kildare
Ireland

jon.mitchell_at_nuim.ie

UPDATE: [American] Fame/Infamy and late 19th-/early 20th-century U.S. literature (4/25/08; MMLA 11/13/08-11/16/08)

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 1:48pm
Jeremy Wells

Fame/Infamy and late 19th-/early 20th-century U.S. literature. This
session will explore the ways in which notions of fame and infamy
structure our understandings of U.S. literature of the late 19th and
early 20th centuries, a period that saw the publication of such once (and
perhaps still) scandalous texts as Dreiser’s Sister Carrie, Chopin’s The
Awakening, Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Dickinson’s Poems,
Sinclair’s The Jungle, Dixon’s Reconstruction trilogy, and others. How
do texts from this period represent issues of fame and infamy? How do
the famous/infamous reputations of these texts shape the ways we read and

CFP: [Film] An Interdisciplinary Conference on Television Series

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 9:52am
Tuna Erdem

"It Has Happened Before, It Will Happen Again: The "Third" Golden Age of Television Fiction

In 1996 Robert J. Thompson wrote the vastly influential Television’s Second Golden Age: From
Hill Street Blues to ER defining the controversial term ‘quality television’. As Thompson himself
has stated, a decade after this publication, what was then exceptional and innovative has now
become the norm, which suggest we might have entered yet another golden age. However
instead of trying to demarcate each and every new wave of golden age, it might be best to claim,
like the Cylons in Battlestar Galactica, that ‘it has happened before and it will happen again’.

CFP: [20th] MSAX: Modernist Humor (deadline 4/30)

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 3:59am
Lauryl Tucker

Proposed Panel: Modernist Humor

Modernist Studies Association Conference (MSA-X: Modernism & Global Media)

November 13-16, 2008; Nashville, TN

UPDATE: [Poetry] Refashioning Myth: Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses

updated: 
Monday, April 14, 2008 - 1:56am
Jessica Wilkinson

Refashioning Myth: Poetic Transformations and Metamorphoses

An International Conference
Thurs 2 â€" Fri 3 October 2008
The University of Melbourne, Australia

The convenors are pleased to announce the addition of Professor John Davidson (Victoria
University of Wellington, New Zealand) as a keynote speaker for this conference. Professor
Davidson joins the distinguished poets Chris Wallace-Crabbe and Dorothy Porter in delivering
plenary addresses at this event.

A reminder that abstracts for academic papers, panels and creative responses should be sent to

poetry-myth_at_unimelb.edu.au by Monday 28 April 2008.

CFP: [Ethnic] Same Sex Desire in American Cinema's Golden Age

updated: 
Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 10:55pm
Julie M. Gale

Hidden Hollywood: Same Sex Desire in American Cinema's Golden Age

Julie M. Gale--Texas Nonprofit Theatres, Inc. (Editor).

This is a call for papers for a collection of essays, to be published by
The Edwin Mellen Press (www.mellenpress.com). To view the publishing
contract, please contact the editor, Julie M. Gale (juliemgale_at_gmail.com).

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