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ROLE OF SOCIAL IMAGINATION IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 - 10:54am
full name / name of organization: 
Dr.D.R.Pratima Roy

This paper aims to present the role and function of social imagination within a comparative framework in literature.Prior to delving into the depths of the topic, it is rudimentary to state the contents of the paper.Key topics include a definition of literature and the impulses behind literature, the elements of literature, the purpose and significance of comparison of literatures in this world of globalization in general, application of social imagination to harmonize the literatures, its prominent and active role in widening the prospective by accommodating all the cultures and literatures through translation and, finally the scpe and limits of social imagination.

[UPDATE] IMC Kalamazoo 2012: Fame! Exploring Reputation, Rumor, and Historical Legacy in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 - 10:20am
full name / name of organization: 
Cornell Medieval Studies Student Colloquium
contact email: 

Influenced by Max Weber's theories of social "enchantment" the theater historian Joseph Roach suggests that, through a process of "re-enchantment," the affects and emotions associated with saints and other religious figures get mapped onto actors and other stars of stage and screen beginning in late seventeenth century Restoration theater. And so the modern notion of celebrity was born. This panel will explore the historical backdrops and preconditions for Roach's claim, examining the ways that the reputations of saints, heretics, kings, poets, and other medieval "celebrities" were formed. We aim to concentrate particularly on the relationships between fame and the circulation of rumor, gossip, and popular opinion.

Special Journal Issue: Surrealism and Egypt

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 - 8:19am
full name / name of organization: 
Dada/Surrealism (http://ir.uiowa.edu/dadasur/)

"Wonderful Things" - Surrealism and Egypt

In November 1922 Howard Carter opened the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt's Valley of the Kings, the greatest archaeological discovery of the 20th century. This discovery triggered an enormous Egyptomanic craze in Europe and America, evident across architecture, the arts and popular culture. This special issue will mark the 90th anniversary of the discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb by evaluating Egypt's significant and diverse impact on surrealism.

Call for Submissions

updated: 
Tuesday, August 2, 2011 - 7:13am
full name / name of organization: 
American, British and Canadian Studies Journal
contact email: 

Call for Papers

ABC Studies, the Journal of the Academic Anglophone Society of Romania, is now accepting submissions for its December 2011 issue, an open-theme edition featuring our usual selection of critical-creative multidisciplinary work. We invite contributions in the form of articles, essays, interviews, book reviews, conference presentations and project outlines that seek to take Anglophone studies to a new level of enquiry across disciplinary boundaries.

[UPDATE] Modernism, Intimacy and Emotion - Proposal deadline 15 August 2011

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2011 - 8:28pm
full name / name of organization: 
Australian Modernist Studies Network - 2012 Symposium

Modernism, Intimacy and Emotion

AMSN Symposium 2012

Hosted by the Writing and Society Research Group
and the School of Humanities and Languages, University of Western Sydney

Date: 6th – 7th February 2012
Venue: Grace Hotel, Sydney

Confirmed keynotes:
Professor Henry Sussman (University of Buffalo)
Professor Gail Jones (Writing and Society, University of Western Sydney)
Associate Professor Jonathan Flatley (Wayne State University)

Deadline Extended. NEMLA: March 15-18, 2012, Rochester, NY: Obscenity, Violence, and Humor in the Eighteenth-Century Novel

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2011 - 5:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
Kathleen Tamayo Alves

This panel will examine eighteenth-century British fiction and the relationship between violence, obscenity and humor. Novelists' use of the obscene joke is a tempered way to suppress the blurring lines of distinction between classes and to maintain hierarchy, a direct response to the changes in society and to the increasing sensitivity to vulgar subjects in polite society. This panel is interested in discovering how authors mobilize social anxiety through violence, obscenity and humor.

Digital Interpretation Roundtable

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2011 - 2:13pm
full name / name of organization: 
Digital Americanists Society
contact email: 

The Digital Americanists Society invites proposals for a roundtable about digital interpretation of nineteenth-century American literature or culture, to be proposed for the C19 Conference at the University of California, Berkeley, April 12-15, 2012. This roundtable will take up the C19 Program Committee's call to investigate how "the field's contours have been enlarged—or foreshortened—by the investigative tools offered by digital technologies." We seek scholars using digital tools—e.g. GIS, data mining, visualization, textual analysis, and other methods—to help them understand the nineteenth century. We are particularly interested in the ways that digital tools can lead scholars toward new interpretive insights into texts and other cultural objects.

Fantastic Narratives and the Natural World

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2011 - 1:55pm
full name / name of organization: 
Dalhousie University, Department of French and Italian

The Department of French and Italian invites contributions for an interdisciplinary colloquium on "Fantastic Narratives and the Natural World" to be held at Dalhousie University (Canada, NS) on April 27/28 2012. Send a 300 word abstract and a one page CV to fantasticnarratives@gmail.com by September 30 2011. Papers will be considered for publication in a special thematic issue of the refereed journal Belphégor – Popular Literature and Media Culture (http://etc.dal.ca/belphegor/)

Fame! Exploring Reputation, Rumor, and Historical Legacy in the Middle Ages: Kalamazoo Medieval Studies Conference Panel

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2011 - 1:46pm
full name / name of organization: 
Cornell Medieval Studies Student Colloquium
contact email: 

Influenced by Max Weber's theories of social "enchantment" the theater historian Joseph Roach suggests that, through a process of "re-enchantment," the affects and emotions associated with saints and other religious figures get mapped onto actors and other stars of stage and screen beginning in late seventeenth century Restoration theater. And so the modern notion of celebrity was born. This conference will explore the historical backdrops and preconditions for Roach's claim, examining the ways that the reputations of saints, heretics, kings, poets, and other medieval "celebrities" were formed. We aim to concentrate particularly on the relationships between fame and the circulation of rumor, gossip, and popular opinion.

Fame! Exploring Reputation, Rumor, and Historical Legacy in the Middle Ages Friday F

updated: 
Monday, August 1, 2011 - 1:41pm
full name / name of organization: 
Cornell Medieval Studies Student Colloquium
contact email: 

Influenced by Max Weber's theories of social "enchantment" the theater historian Joseph Roach suggests that, through a process of "re-enchantment," the affects and emotions associated with saints and other religious figures get mapped onto actors and other stars of stage and screen beginning in late seventeenth century Restoration theater. And so the modern notion of celebrity was born. This conference will explore the historical backdrops and preconditions for Roach's claim, examining the ways that the reputations of saints, heretics, kings, poets, and other medieval "celebrities" were formed. We aim to concentrate particularly on the relationships between fame and the circulation of rumor, gossip, and popular opinion.

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