all recent posts

Eastern Religions in Ethnic U.S. Literatures (MELUS, April 19-22, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2011 - 8:10pm
J. Stephen Pearson, U of Tennessee

Submissions are being accepted for a panel that discusses depictions of or references to Eastern religious traditions (e.g. Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, etc.) in ethnic U.S. texts.

Topics of interest include (but are certainly not limited to):

~ how religious traditions, beliefs and practices are altered for a U.S. context
~ how they assist and/or interfere with the process of Americanization
~ how they promote and/or hinder community identity
~ how they are viewed by people from other traditions
~ etc.

Religious Transnationalism in Ethnic U.S. Literatures (MELUS, April 19-22, 2012)

updated: 
Monday, September 5, 2011 - 8:01pm
J. Stephen Pearson, U of Tennessee

Given the connection between many religions to specific geographical locations outside of the United States (for example: Jerusalem, Rome, Mecca, the Ganges, Tepeyac, etc.), religious practice can be seen as a common and powerful means of transnational experience in the U.S.

Submissions are being accepted for a panel that discusses depictions of or references to such transnational aspects of religious practice and/or belief (from any tradition) within ethnic U.S. texts.

Send a 1-page abstract by Sunday, 16 October to Dr. J. Stephen Pearson (U of Tennessee, Knoxville) at stpears11@gmail.com . Panelists will be notified by the 23rd of October.

CFP: Theatre & Performance Studies, Abstracts Due 12/1/11

updated: 
Sunday, September 4, 2011 - 12:39am
33rd Annual SWTX PCA/ACA Conference

Panels are now being formed on topics related to Theatre & Performance Studies in its various forms and approaches. This new Special Topics Area to SWTX PCA/ACA encourages dialogue between varied fields of performance scholarship (i.e., performance studies; theatre, dance, and cultural studies; as well as queer and post-colonial theory), and exploration of critiques of race, ethnicity, class, sexuality, technology, and nation. Papers across performance modes, cultural contexts, and historical periods are welcomed. Topics might include but are not limited to:

James Bond and Popular Culture, Abstract Due December 1st, 2011

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 9:47pm
Michele Brittany, Southwest Texas Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association

Call for Papers: James Bond and Popular Culture
Title and Abstract Submission Deadline: December 1, 2011

Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association
33rd Annual Conference celebrating "Food & Culture(s) in a Global Context"
February 8 – 11, 2012
Conference Hotel: Hyatt Regency, 330 Tijeras NW, Albuquerque, NM (505) 842-1234
http://www.swtxpca.org

The SWTX PCA/ACA James Bond and Popular Culture Area Chair invites papers for the annual conference on ANY aspect of James Bond films, literature, comics, video games, and culture. Here are some topics to consider, but is by no means an exhaustive list:

Conference on the Black Experience, February 6-9th, 2012."Celebrations of Black Women in American History and Culture"

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 6:46pm
Paine College

"Celebrations of Black Women in American History and Culture"
Paine College; Contact email: aonisegun@paine.edu
CALL FOR PROPOSALS
CONFERENCE ON THE BLACK EXPERIENCE
"CELEBRATIONS OF BLACK WOMEN IN AMERICAN HISTORY AND CULTURE"

The Black History Month Committee at Paine College is requesting proposals for the annual Conference on the Black Experience to be held on the campus of historic Paine College
February 6-9th, 2012.

Motorcycle Life and Culture

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 3:03pm
SW/TX Region PCA/ACA Annual Conference

MOTORCYCLE LIFE AND CULTURE
Annual Meeting of the Popular Culture and American Culture Associations, Southwest/Texas Region (Joint Conference with National PCA/ACA)
Hyatt Regency
Albuquerque, NM February 8-11, 2012
The SW/TX Popular Culture and American Culture Associations are inviting papers on motorcycling and its impact on American society, other societies and cultures.
Suggested topics include:
* Riders' narratives or descriptions of the ride
* The motorcycle as art, poetry, or agency
* Rituals, norms, customs, or influences in motorcycle culture
* The biker as subaltern or as "other"
* Movies, films, or other images of motorcyclists

Intellectual Disability in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (Kalamazoo, May 10-13, 2012)

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 12:09pm
47th International Congress on Medieval Studies (Special Session)

Call for papers: Intellectual Disability in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

This special session will take place at the 47th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan (May 10-13, 2012).

Medieval Popular Culture and Arthurian Legends, April 11-14th, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 12:03pm
42nd Annual Popular and American Culture Associations Conference

Medieval Popular Culture and Arthurian Legends at the 42nd Annual Popular and American Culture Associations Conference

April 11-14th, 2012, Boston, Massachusetts

Call for papers and panel proposals on all popular treatments of the Middle Ages or Arthurian Legend from any period and in any medium. We will consider all proposals for papers, but we especially encourage abstracts on the following for this year's conference:

International Folkloristics Series, Call for Manuscripts, Peter Lang Publishing

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 10:54am
Dundes, Alan (founding editor) / Mieder, Wolfgang (series editor); Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor - Peter Lang

This series, originally founded by Alan Dundes and edited by Wolfgang Mieder, includes theoretical studies of any genre or aspect of folklore. The series welcomes individually authored and collaboratively authored books, monographs, collections of data, bibliographies, and Festschriften of at least 40,000 words. The emphasis will be on analytic and methodological innovations in the consideration of myth, folktale, legend, superstition, proverb, riddle, folksong, festival, game or any other form of folklore as well as any of the interpretative approaches to folklore topics.

For inquiries or to submit proposals/manuscripts please contact Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor, caitlinl@plang.com

Framing Film Series, Call for Manuscripts, Peter Lang Publishing

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 10:48am
Frank Beaver, Ph.D., Series Editor; Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor - Peter Lang

Framing Film has committed itself to the acquisition and publication of serious, high-quality film studies on topics of national and international interest. The series editors are open to a full range of scholarly methodologies and analytical approaches in the examination of cinema art and history, including topics on film theory, film and society, gender and race, politics. Cutting-edge studies and diverse points of view are particularly encouraged.

We accept original studies, including substantially revised dissertations and edited collections, of at least 40,000 words. For inquiries or to submit proposals/manuscripts please contact Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor, caitlinl@plang.com

Masculinities Studies: Literary and Cultural Representations, Call for Manuscripts, Peter Lang Publishing

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 10:46am
Josep M. Armengol, Ph.D., and Àngels Carabí, Ph.D., Series Editors; Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor - Peter Lang

In line with the latest trends within masculinity scholarship, the books in this series deal with representations of masculinities in culture, in general, and literature, in particular. The aim of this series is twofold. On the one hand, it focuses on studies that question traditionally normative representations of masculinities. On the other, it seeks to highlight new alternative representations of manhood, looking for more egalitarian models of manhood in and through literature and culture. Besides literary representations, the series is open to studies of masculinity in cinema, theatre, music, as well as all kinds of artistic and visual representations.

South Asian Literature, Arts, and Culture Studies Series, Call for Manuscripts, Peter Lang Publishing

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 10:43am
Moumin Quazi, Ph.D., Series Editor; Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor - Peter Lang

The South Asian Literature, Arts and Culture Studies series is currently inviting submissions of at least 40,000 words from scholars working in the field of South Asian Studies, with a particular interest in literature, the arts (print and film), politics, religion, and society. The series considers original studies, including substantially revised dissertations and edited collections.

Postcolonial Studies Series, Call for Manuscripts, Peter Lang Publishing

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 10:39am
Maria C. Zamora, Ph.D., Series Editor; Caitlin Lavelle, Acquisitions Editor - Peter Lang

The Postcolonial Studies series is now accepting original submissions of at least 40,000 words in the form of welcomes both individually authored and collaboratively authored books and monographs as well as edited collections of essays.

Writing and dramatising the body : violence, discordance and reconfiguration in English-language literature and drama

updated: 
Saturday, September 3, 2011 - 4:17am
Université Charles de Gaulle - Lille 3 (Lille, France)

Should violence be considered as one of the experiences the body undergoes in literature or as an ordeal which elicits the very question of what this body is – a body which is mapped in language and speech. As a result of the violence that it undergoes, inflicts or self-inflicts, the body grapples with something which is not simply outside itself: it discovers its own foreignness, its own discordance. It rebelliously slips through the categories in which one attempts to contain it, but it also defies the biological body to which it cannot be reduced. What does a body do when, for no apparent reason, it breaks, splits, is pulled asunder, petrified? What happens when the part usurps the whole or the whole body is reduced to nothing, mere refuse?

[Update]: CFP - The Apocalypse in Literature and Film (October 1, 2011)

updated: 
Friday, September 2, 2011 - 8:32pm
The journal _LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory_

Alien invasion, viral outbreak, nuclear holocaust, the rise of the machines, the flood, the second coming, the second ice age—these are just a few of the ways human beings have imagined their "end of days." And someone's Armageddon clock is always ticking—we just dodged Harold Camping's rapture on May 21st of this year, and the Mayan-predicted doomsday of 2012 is just around the corner. In the end, what do we reveal about ourselves when we dream of the apocalypse? What are the social and political functions of these narratives in any given historical period? How do different cultures imagine the apocalypse, and what do these differences reveal? What is particular to the narratological design and content of apocalyptic texts?

Pages