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[UPDATE] Black Masculinity in the Trump Era

updated: 
Friday, August 11, 2017 - 1:01pm
North Carolina Central University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 4, 2017

Black Masculinity in the Trump Era

North Carolina Central University's Departments of Language and Literature and Mass Communication will host the ninth African American Literature/Studies Symposium on Thursday, February 8, 2018.  This year's theme is "Black Masculinity in the Trump Era".  The symposium will explore various contemporary approaches to the study of Black Masculinity in African American Studies.

Possible Paper topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Afrofuturism, Authenticity, Disability Studies, Drama, Folklore, Gender Studies, Hip Hop Studies, Intertextuality, Film/Television, Literary Canon, Memory, Protest, Pop Culture, and Urban Literature

Embodiment in Science Fiction and Fantasy Interdisciplinary Conference

updated: 
Friday, August 11, 2017 - 9:25am
McMaster University, Department of English and Cultural Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Embodiment in Science Fiction and Fantasy Interdisciplinary Conference

May 18-19, 2018

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Keynote Speakers

Veronica Hollinger, emerita professor, Cultural Studies Department, Trent University, science fiction scholar and co-editor of the journal Science Fiction Studies and collections including Queer Universes: Sexuality in Science Fiction (2008). Parabolas of Science Fiction (2013), and The Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction (2010).

Women, Art and Feminism in Australia since 1970

updated: 
Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 11:09pm
Anne Marsh:Women, Art and Feminism in Australia since 1970, Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Call for papers and proposals

Keynote Speakers Professor Clare Hemmings and A/Professor Jennifer Biddle.

National Symposium

22nd and 23rd of February, 2018

Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne

Melbourne, Australia.

online submission form and further information http://www.wafa.net.au

Imagining Other Worlds: Setting in Early Modern English Drama

updated: 
Thursday, August 10, 2017 - 8:47pm
Philip Goldfarb Styrt/Northeast MLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Every play imagines its own world—but the worlds they imagine must in some way connect with their audience. This panel invites perspectives on early modern English drama that considers the balance between these two poles: the imagined world of the setting and its connection to the surrounding culture in early modern England. This balance is particularly important in early modern English drama for both historical reasons—an increased awareness of other worlds and their different reality within the expanding cultural purview of the early modern English—and literary ones—since so much criticism of these plays has focused on their relation to early modern England itself to the exclusion of their frequently quite disparate settings.

Conflicted Spaces: Queer/Trans Relationships to Ideas of Safety and Space

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:54pm
Megan Paslawski / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This panel seeks papers that discuss the historical and cultural relationships between queerness/transness and ideas of safe spaces. Focal points may include, but are not limited to, college campus, gayborhoods, and the queer/trans internet. Areas of particular interest encompass the effects of the “non-profit industrial complex” on LGBTQ understandings of their needs, intergenerational mentorship and the relationship of the “traumatized past” to the “safe future,” how race, class, and gender affect queer ideation of safeness, utopian impulses in striving for safe spaces, and the relationship of queer theory to the resurgence of identity politics.

Pedagogy & Popular Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:54pm
Southwest Popular & American Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 22, 2017

 

Call for Papers

Kurt Depner, Area Chair, Pedagogy & Popular Culture

Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA)

 

39th Annual Conference, February 7-10, 2018

Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center

Albuquerque, New Mexico

http://www.southwestpca.org

Proposal submission deadline: October 22, 2017

 

The Things We Carry: Strategies for Recognizing and Negotiating Emotional Labor in Writing Program Administration

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:54pm
Courtney Adams Wooten, Jacob Babb, Kristi Murray Costello, Kate Navickas, editors
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 15, 2017

Affect and emotion have long been staples of WPA scholarship, field stories, and lore. In fact, Diana George’s iconic collection, Kitchen Cooks, Plate Twirlers & Troubadours: Writing Program Administrators Tell Their Stories, includes several chapters dedicated to the emotional labor of WPAs, such as Mary Pinard’s “Surviving the Honeymoon: Bliss and Anxiety in a WPA’s First Year or Appreciating the Plate Twirler’s Art,” in which she discusses the isolation and pressure of a do-it-yourself approach, and Doug Hesse’s “The WPA as Father, Husband, Ex,” in which he discusses the roots and implications of his perpetual feeling of provisional access and his need to be a prover and a provider, all rooted in his working class background (47).

Asia Intermedialities Workshop

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:53pm
Elmo Gonzaga / The Chinese University of Hong Kong
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 11, 2017

Asia Intermedialities: New Objects, Themes, and Methods at the Convergence of East and Southeast Asian Cultural and Media Studies

 

Centre for Cultural Studies

Department of Cultural and Religious Studies

The Chinese University of Hong Kong

25-26 May 2018

 

Convener: Elmo Gonzaga (Cultural and Religious Studies, CUHK)

 

Twin Peaks

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:53pm
Supernatural Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 1, 2017

Call for Papers, Fall/Winter 2018 Special Issue: Twin Peaks

Guest Editor: Franck Boulègue, co-editor of the book Fan Phenomena: Twin Peaks (2013) and author of the book Twin Peaks: Unwrapping the Plastic (2016).

Preach It, Sister! A Roundtable about Women and Homiletics

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:53pm
Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

CFP: Preach It, Sister! A Roundtable about Women and Homiletics
Sponsored by the Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at the 53rd International Congress on Medieval Studies
Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, MI), May 10-13, 2018

Edited Collection: Critical Insights into Frank Yerby (University Press of Mississippi)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:53pm
Matthew Teutsch/ Auburn University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, October 4, 2017

In the fall of 2016, Paine College hosted the Frank Yerby Centennial Celebration and Evelyn Etheridge Conference on the Harlem Renaissance to celebrate Yerby's 100th birthday. Over the past few years, scholars such as Veronica Watson, Gene Andrew Jarrett, Stephanie Brown, and James C. Charles have provided much needed insight regarding Yerby's first novel The Foxes of Harrow (1946) and its follow up The Vixens (1947). This work adds to the scholarship of James L. Hill.

Large Objects Moving Air 2018

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:53pm
CRiSAP - Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice, University of the Arts London
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 15, 2017

Large Objects Moving Air 20188 January 2018

CRiSAP - Creative Research into Sound Arts Practice

London College of Communication

University of the Arts London

Full details are avaialble on the CRiSAP website

 

Theme

Disability Aesthetics: New Directions (ACLA 2018 Seminar)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 9, 2017 - 1:53pm
American Comparative Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 21, 2017

Disability studies has a problem with representation. Michael Bérubé locates the roots of this problem in two dominant trajectories of literary disability studies. The first trajectory largely pursues a logic of identification and revelation, a tactic for demonstrating the ubiquity of disabled characters and the overwhelmingly negative thematics attached to their peripheral bodyminds. The second trajectory depends on diagnosing characters as disabled that have not been explicitly designated as such.

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