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Becoming Dystopian? How Readers Respond when Dystopia Looks like their Lives

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:47pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

What purpose do dystopian novels serve?  What is their effect on readers?  Are they meant to change readers’ behavior, to call them to action, or are they meant to be read for entertainment?  How do readers typically respond to reading them?  When dystopian works become so popular that they flood the markets, do they lose their impact becoming merely white noise?

Essays on Elizabeth Robins Pennell

updated: 
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 5:35pm
Edited collection of essays on Elizabeth Robins Pennell
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

Co-editors Dave Buchanan (MacEwan University), editor of Pennell’s A Canterbury Pilgrimage and An Italian Pilgrimage (University of Alberta Press, 2015), and Kimberly Morse Jones (Sweet Briar College), author of Elizabeth Robins Pennell, Nineteenth-Century Pioneer of Modern Art Criticism (Ashgate, 2015), are seeking proposals for interdisciplinary essays on the work and life of Elizabeth Robins Pennell, the American-born, London-based journalist and author who published (or co-published) over twenty books and hundreds of periodical articles between the early 1880s and 1930.

Seeking Contributors to The Open Anthology of Early American Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, May 16, 2017 - 2:16pm
Timothy Robbins / Rebus Community
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, May 15, 2018

We are currently seeking writers, editors, and contributors of all kinds to The Open Anthology of Earlier American Literature, an Open Educational Resource (OER) textbook under development with the Rebus Community. Rebus is a non-profit organization that works with faculty, librarians, students, and staff to build tools and resources in support of free and open textbook publishing.

Funny in the Funnies

updated: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:29am
Studies in American Humor
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

Humor was the original scaffolding upon which American comic books were built. We have not historically called them “funny books” for nothing. Today, however, humor-based comics and graphic novels have been relatively marginalized by both scholars and contemporary readers alike. The focus of this special issue of Studies in American Humor, ser. 4, 4, no. 2 (October 2018), will be the comic side of comics, the funny that helped make the funnies. We are looking for essays that discuss graphic humor in periodicals from historical, thematic, and theoretical perspectives.

Book Reviews

updated: 
Tuesday, May 16, 2017 - 1:47pm
English: The Journal of the English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 31, 2018

English: The Journal of the English Association (Oxford UP) seeks reliable book reviewers.  Please email the Reviews Editor, Dr Adam Hansen (adam.hansen@northumbria.ac.uk) with your CV (2 pages maximum) and a brief (100 words) statement of areas of interest or expertise.

The Final Frontier: Outer Space and Popular Culture (Special Session, SAMLA Conference 2017, Atlanta, GA, 11/3-5, 2017)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:30am
Andrea Krafft
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 2, 2017

This CFP invites papers dealing with fictional representations of outer space, intergalactic travel, and other worlds. This panel is particularly interested in discussing why some texts about outer space remain central within scholarly and popular discourse while others fade into obscurity. Does the value of intergalactic fiction derive from its scientific and technological realism and its ability to, according to Hugo Gernsback, inspire “scientific fact and prophetic vision”? Or, does the staying power of these speculative fictions come from their complex worldmaking and engagement with empire and colonization (as in Isaac Asimov’s Foundation series)? What determines whether we return to someone’s vision of life beyond the boundaries of Earth?

2018 AUM Southern Studies Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:39am
Auburn University at Montgomery
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 16, 2017

Now in its tenth year, the AUM Southern Studies Conference invites panel and paper proposals on any aspect of Southern literature. The conference will be held 9-10 February 2018. Topics may include but are not limited to:

IRELAND, IRISH AMERICA, and WORK

updated: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:37am
American Conference for Irish Studies--western region
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 15, 2017

Ireland, Irish America, and Work is the theme of the 33rd annual meeting of the American Conference for Irish Studies-Western Regional [ACIS-West] for Oct. 19-22, 2017 at the Davenport Hotel in Spokane, Washington. Many prominent members of the American Labor Movement were Irish and Irish-American. Jim Larkin and James Connolly worked for the I.W.W in both Ireland and the United States, where, in 1917, the I.W.W. began to face vicious repression. By July 1917, federal troops began to be used to suppress industrial conflicts, to raid I.W.W. halls, to break up meetings, and to arrest Wobblies. In Spokane, Irish I.W.W. leader James Rowan was arrested and sent to Leavenworth.

Featuring

"The Holocaust and the Domestic"

updated: 
Wednesday, May 17, 2017 - 10:37am
NeMLA 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 28, 2017

As Holocaust survivors were liberated from concentration camps, prisons, and places of hiding—among other compromised milieus they were forced to inhabit from 1939–45—they brought the memories and the trauma of the Holocaust to the places they eventually came to call “home.” Bringing such emotional and psychological burdens with them, many survivors settled abroad—from Argentina to Canada and from the United States to Israel—and established families, rearing those who would later be called “second-generation” Holocaust survivors. These children of Holocaust survivors (and their children) have become the carriers and bearers of their parents’ memories and trauma that came to define the domestic experience of survivor households.

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