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Call for Chapters - Audio Disruption

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:47am
David Allan/Saint Joseph's University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 1, 2019

Objective of the book: This edited research book focuses on audio disruption from a wide spectrum. While some industries have been more disruptive than others, none have probably been more transformational than music streaming (Spotify, Pandora, etc.). While the disruption of the music industry itself due to streaming has been well documented, the disruption of the industries that rely on popular music namely radio, advertising and retail have not. For radio (iHeartMedia, Beasley, Entercom, etc.), this includes the additional audio competition and ever expanding availability and transportability.

Novels, Then and Now

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:25am
Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Association (MAPACA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2019

This area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular and American Culture Conference (MAPACA), November 7-9 2019, includes all novel genres, authors, time periods, cultures, and settings. Consider it a safety net for novels that don’t fit neatly into a specific genre or that cross genres. For example, consider the many sub-genres of Romance with a capital “R”—western, thriller, paranormal, religious, romance (with a small “r”), detective, urban fantasy, etc. From Pearl S. Buck to Lee Child, from Laurie King to Tony Hillerman, from Julia Spencer-Fleming to Emilie Richards—all are welcome.

PAMLA 2019: Poetry and Poetics

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:53am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 10, 2019

PAMLA 2019 – Poetry and Poetics

Presiding Officer: Tom Jesse (University of Wisconsin-La Crosse)

Proposal Deadline: June 10, 2019

For this year’s “Poetry and Poetics” session, we are open to paper topics that span a wide range of (sub)genres, time periods, and critical approaches. Given the PAMLA 2019 conference theme of “Send In the Clowns,” we are especially interested in papers that engage with poetic “clowning” of all sorts—including but not limited to:

The Disruptive Child in Literature of America (NeMLA 2020 Boston)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:55am
NeMLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The child occupies a fraught space in American culture, as notions of the “rebellious adolescent” and the “infant nation” have long tethered political upheaval to the figure of the child. This panel seeks to examine child figures who have performed disruption in the literature of America with particular interest in disruption that confronts notions of authority, ownership, and belonging.

Global Medievalisms

updated: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 2:57pm
International Society for the Study of Medievalism
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019

34th International Conference on Medievalism

 

Dear colleagues,

Below please find the call for papers for this year's ISSM conference:

 

GLOBAL MEDIEVALISMS

NeMLA 2020 CFP: Color and Text: Reading Kultur et Phyla

updated: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 8:08am
NeMLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The panel considers readings of text in terms of race, gender, and class. A review of literary works stems from Stanley Fish’s essay titled “Is there a Text in this Class?” and for this panel the idea of reading considers text as more than text and regard the reader’s thoughts involving textual perception. This panel reviews receptions of literary (i.e.

Pedagogies and Challenges: Teaching Asian America Through Graphic Narratives (Roundtable)

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 11:03am
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Over the past few years, graphic narratives as a form of cultural expression have gained positive reception in literary circles, but how does this genre serve the purpose for teaching about race in America? While teaching about race requires “viewing,” using graphic narratives can effectively educate students about race that sometimes traditional prose narratives cannot. However, some argue whether visual representations, like films and mass media, can potentially perpetuate racial stereotypes. Do graphic narratives reinforce or disrupt racial stereotypes? How do we adopt this genre to advance our teaching and promote students’ understanding of Asian America?

Roundtable on George Romero’s Knightriders (1981) (MAPACA 2019)

updated: 
Thursday, May 30, 2019 - 2:29pm
Michael A Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, June 30, 2019

Call for Papers for Another Reason to Celebrate Pittsburgh: A Roundtable on George Romero’s Knightriders (1981)

 

A session sponsored by the Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture for the Medieval & Renaissance Area of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

 

2019 Annual Conference of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

 

Pittsburgh Marriott City Center Hotel, Pittsburgh, PA

 

7-9 November 2019

 

Proposals due by 30 June 2019

 

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