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"T. S. Eliot and the Biological": Special Edition of The T. S. Eliot Studies Annual

updated: 
Monday, October 16, 2017 - 12:40pm
Julia Daniel,
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, January 30, 2018

Clemson University Press is pleased to invite essay submissions of approximately 7,000 words to volume 3 of The T. S. Eliot Studies Annual (2019 publication). We welcome work on our special topic, “Eliot and the Biological,” particularly essays that engage with ecocriticism, animal studies, and theorizations of the body.

Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words and a brief CV to Julia Daniel, guest editor, at julia.eliz.daniel@gmail.com, before January 30th. Accepted essays will due by August 1, 2018.

Americanis/zation

updated: 
Monday, October 16, 2017 - 12:40pm
Molly O'BRIEN CASTRO, Tours University/ICD
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 5, 2017

Organized by Molly O'BRIEN CASTRO & Alexis CHOMMELOUX

Tours University/ICD (FRANCE)

8-9/2 2018

 

Listening to Refugees & Immigrants

updated: 
Thursday, October 12, 2017 - 1:32pm
albeit
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 15, 2018

albeit, an innovative, MLA-indexed online journal of scholarship and pedagogy, invites scholarly articles, detailed lesson plans, book reviews, creative pieces, and nonfiction essays exploring the theme of literature by and concerning refugees and immigrants.

Topics for this issue can include, but are not limited to:
Fictional accounts of exile
The Jewish diaspora
Literature of political disillusionment
The role of nostalgia in displaced writers
Being “at home” in America
Trauma and/as emigration
Representations of exile in comics and graphic novels

Hazardous Objects: Function, Materiality, and Context

updated: 
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 9:48am
University of Delaware Center for Material Culture Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 10, 2017

Hazardous Objects: Function, Materiality, and ContextWinterthur Museum, Garden & LibraryApril 27-28, 2018 The Center for Material Culture Studies at the University of Delaware invitessubmissions for papers to be given at the Fifteenth Material Culture Symposium for Emerging Scholars.  We invite papers that identify and consider the production and use of hazardous material culture. Whether through composition or intended function, objects are hazardous or may become hazardous. Certain materials, organic or artificial, exist as hazards to humans. Additionally, hazards are often embedded in the material environment and affect our experience of domestic, institutional and public space.   What makes an object hazardous?

UPDATE: Octavia E. Butler: Uniting the Academy and the Community

updated: 
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 - 9:45am
Octavia E. Butler Literary Society
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 31, 2017

The fiction of Octavia E. Butler has fired the imaginations of academics and activists alike. Quite often, however, these communities are walled off from one another. Butler’s explorations of the environment, sexuality, race, politics, and many other topics have established her legacy as a revolutionary, and her influence cannot be contained by the traditional categories and boundaries in which knowledge is typically organized. Her work is too vital to be put into any kind of box. For our second biennial conference, the Octavia E.

Deadline Extended! Papers on Tim O'Brien

updated: 
Wednesday, December 6, 2017 - 12:40pm
Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 29, 2017

Call for Papers

Papers and Presentations on Mark Twain Award Winner Tim O’Brien

Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature Annual Symposium

May 17-19, 2018

Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center, East Lansing, Michigan

 

Surveillance, Architecture and Control: Discourses on Spatial Culture

updated: 
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 11:17am
Dr. Susan Flynn, University of the Arts London and Dr. Antonia Mackay, Oxford Brookes University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 20, 2017

 

Call for Papers: Edited Collection

 

Surveillance, Architecture and Control: Discourses on Spatial Culture

 

 

 

Toward an Ecopoetics of Randomness and Design (Ecozon@ Issue 10.1, Spring 2019)

updated: 
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 11:17am
Ecozon@ - European Journal of Literature, Culture, and Environment
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 15, 2018

Issue 10.1 Spring 2019. Toward an Ecopoetics of Randomness and Design. Guest Editors: Franca Bellarsi and Judith Rauscher. Université libre de Bruxelles and Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg. (Submissions open on 15 May 2018 and close on 15 July 2018).

Queer Modernism(s) II: Intersectional Identities

updated: 
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 11:16am
University of Oxford
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, December 18, 2017

After the resounding success of the first Queer Modernism(s) conference in 2017, we are excited to announce the CfP for Queer Modernism(s) II: Intersectional Identities, set to be held on April 12th & 13th 2018 at the University of Oxford. Queer Modernism(s) II is an interdisciplinary, international conference exploring the place of queer identity in modernist art, literature and culture, with an emphasis on intersecting identities. Panelists are invited to question, discuss and interrogate the social, sexual, romantic, artistic, affective, legal and textual relationship between queer identity and modernity.

The CfP closes December 18th 2017. Decisions will be made in early January.

Genealogies of Latinx Eco-Media

updated: 
Monday, October 9, 2017 - 11:16am
Latina/o Studies Association Biennial Conference / Washington, D.C. / July 11th-15th, 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 17, 2017

This panel explores the genealogies of Latinx eco-media, defined broadly to include literature, visual art, film, music, and everything in between. As Euro-American fantasies like the pristine wilderness and the balanced ecosystem become increasingly untenable, it looks to Latinx eco-media for aesthetic, conceptual, and political alternatives. And as the effects of climate change become increasingly pervasive, it recovers Latinx strategies for reimagining—and ultimately, transforming—human communities and nonhuman environments.

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